Passing along Sewing Skills

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A friend who has been given her aunts Husky Sewing Machine has asked me to  
teach her the basic sewing skills.  We will start in a week or so with her  
learning the basics of the machine while sewing a simple project.  I do so  
enjoy teaching my love of sewing!
Barbara in rainy SC  



Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
On Tuesday, August 19, 2014 5:49:16 PM UTC-5, Bobbie Sews More wrote:
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I'm sure you both will have a great time and she will learn a lot.  Keep us posted on how she's doing.

Re: Passing along Sewing Skills


"ItsJoanNotJoann"  wrote in message  

On Tuesday, August 19, 2014 5:49:16 PM UTC-5, Bobbie Sews More wrote:
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I'm sure you both will have a great time and she will learn a lot.  Keep us  
posted on how she's doing.

Thanks Joan!  She is excited about learning to use her machine to do simple  
projects at first.
Barbara  



Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
On 8/20/2014 6:22 PM, Bobbie Sews More wrote:
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That's terrific Barbara! I know you will both enjoy the time spent together.
Juno

Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
On Wednesday, August 20, 2014 5:22:47 PM UTC-5, Bobbie Sews More wrote:
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My sewing skills are not spectacular but I do love my time at the machine.

Re: Passing along Sewing Skills

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It's a great joy and very satisfactory to pass on one sewing skills, and  
even more so to be asked to do it. My student Jennifer did fairly well,  
although her lack of accuracy sometimes made me cringe. However, she never  
lacked courage and I'm sure that, in time, she will remember my advice that  
sewing gets a lot easier if you cut the fabric exactly, and practice will  
teach her hand. A pity she moved to Sweden this summer, with her kids and  
husband who is a Swedish native. We'll stay in touch via Facebook, I guess,  
where she posts her new creations for Cosplay regularly. My own DD, on the  
other hand, isn't quite ready for sewing yet, although she wants to. We'll  
have to take some time to practice, I guess. On the other hand, this morning  
her school integration assistant (she's got one as of the start of this  
term, a lovely lady) told me that she did brilliantly in Maths yesterday  
while all the other kids had trouble with what was asked of them. Is this my  
kid? I was a failure at maths; only geometry was mine. I guess she's her  
daddy's daughter...

Sorry, I just had to share, after all the trouble we've had so far with her.  
It's great for you, Barbara, that you can pass on your skills.

U.  


Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
Ursula Schrader wrote:
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Ursula, very simple projects are a good start.  When I started DGD  
out, in order to teach her to guide the fabric, I had her stitch on  
a four inch wide piece of mid-weight twill, which I had sewn, turned  
and pressed.  DGD stitched row after parallel row, using many of the  
fancy stitches on my machine in different colors of thread.  She  
used the band as a belt.  Her next project was matching pillowcases  
for herself and her doll, with fancy stitches at the hem.

Start her out with easy stuff, progress as she masters the skills,  
so that SHE does not get discouraged and YOU don't get frustrated.  
Or vice versa...   :-)

--  
Beverly
http://www.ickes.us


Re: Passing along Sewing Skills

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Or both... ;-) Yes, I will, I just need to get myself sorted. But things are  
getting better. I hope. ;-)

U. - Will keep you posted, like it or not. ;->
  


Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
:Ursula Schrader wrote:
:>> I'm sure you both will have a great time and she will learn a
:>> lot.  Keep us posted on how she's doing.
:>
:> It's a great joy and very satisfactory to pass on one sewing
:> skills, and even more so to be asked to do it. My student
:> Jennifer did fairly well, although her lack of accuracy
:> sometimes made me cringe. However, she never lacked courage
:> and I'm sure that, in time, she will remember my advice that
:> sewing gets a lot easier if you cut the fabric exactly, and
:> practice will teach her hand. A pity she moved to Sweden this
:> summer, with her kids and husband who is a Swedish native.
:> We'll stay in touch via Facebook, I guess, where she posts her
:> new creations for Cosplay regularly. My own DD, on the other
:> hand, isn't quite ready for sewing yet, although she wants to.
:> We'll have to take some time to practice, I guess. On the
:> other hand, this morning her school integration assistant
:> (she's got one as of the start of this term, a lovely lady)
:> told me that she did brilliantly in Maths yesterday while all
:> the other kids had trouble with what was asked of them. Is
:> this my kid? I was a failure at maths; only geometry was mine.
:> I guess she's her daddy's daughter...
:> Sorry, I just had to share, after all the trouble we've had so
:> far with her. It's great for you, Barbara, that you can pass
:> on your skills.

:Ursula, very simple projects are a good start.  When I started DGD  
:out, in order to teach her to guide the fabric, I had her stitch on  
:a four inch wide piece of mid-weight twill, which I had sewn, turned  
:and pressed.  DGD stitched row after parallel row, using many of the  
:fancy stitches on my machine in different colors of thread.  She  
:used the band as a belt.  Her next project was matching pillowcases  
:for herself and her doll, with fancy stitches at the hem.

:Start her out with easy stuff, progress as she masters the skills,  
:so that SHE does not get discouraged and YOU don't get frustrated.  
:Or vice versa...   :-)

On the other hand, don't do things just because you have to make a
pillowcase (or a drawstring skirt, or whatever) as your first project.
Many people get frustrated by things they think are make work, and do
much better making something they want.  You can steer them to
something reasonable, but don't assume that just becaues there's a
zipper or a pocket or something like that that's it's too hard for a
beginner.  On the other hand, if what they want is a pillowcase or a
drawstring skirt, great!


--  
sig 33

Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
David Scheidt wrote:
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True, perhaps for an adult, but we are talking about a young *child*  
student here.

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On yet another hand, if your student "wants" a couture tailored suit  
I would advise against starting out with that.  Several important  
skills *need* to be learned first.

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Baby steps...  very young sewists need to learn to guide the fabric  
through the machine, including both straight and curved lines,  
before trying to insert a zipper or applying a patch pocket.  Sewing  
lines (without thread) on paper is also very good practice.  They  
can try to follow the lines of i.e. a coloring-book drawing to make  
it more interesting.

Nothing crushes enthusiasm for sewing faster than putting in several  
hours of work only to produce a [pillowcase/garment/curtain, etc.]  
that ends up in the trash because basic skills had not yet been  
developed and practiced.

IMHO of course...




Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
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I find kids often are willing to put a great deal of effort into something  
for someone else... even something as basic as beanbags for preschool kids.
Costumes made of stretchy fabrics that don't need hems are another fun group  
of projects for kids, in my experience.

Kay


Re: Passing along Sewing Skills

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OK, although it's bad manners I'll leave the thread mostly uncut here and  
will reply to David's and Beverly's thoughts in just one post. Please  
forgive me for that. ;-)

I thoroughly see David's point; nothing is worse than the stupid samplers  
one had to do at school. What for do I have to do all this work? And with  
Jennifer, my other student or pupil, I'm not sure which expression is the  
correct one here, I tried to keep it as simple as possible for her sake  
while still fulfilling her needs. Remember, she did and still does Cosplay  
and constantly wants to make garments that were meant to exist only on  
paper/bits & bytes. Man, did we use a lot of fabric glue... ;-) She never  
gave up and kept on working on her own and made good progress. She does  
things not necessarily the way we would do them but it's alright for her  
purposes.

Now, for my DD, I'd chose a different route. She just turned seven, has ADHD  
and can be a bit featherbrained at times. If I want to pass any skills on to  
her, I'll have to structure my lessons carefully. For her, a pillowcase or a  
drawstring  bag would be just as great as a skirt or a blouse or a  
three-piece tailored suit. Her world is still full of fairies, pixie dust,  
and bling, so as long as the object contains enough bling and/or can be used  
in connection with her dolls or treasures, everything is fine.

I think I might make an approach to machine sewing with her in the autumn  
holidays with what Beverly suggested: Cards to sew on, and fancy stitch on  
easy pieces. We'll see how she does. Right now my foremost care is to teach  
her reading. Don't ask, it would go totally OT...

U.  


Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
Bobbie Sews More wrote:
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It is so gratifying to teach others our special skills.  My DGD
headed off to NYC this evening, to start her four years of
undergraduate studies at Juilliard.  She was very sorry she could
not fit her sewing machine into the supplies she is taking.  She
really loves sewing, right up there next to playing the bassoon.

She took the tote bag with the Juilliard logo I embroidered for her
as her carry on.  :-D  I added a picture here, scroll down a bit:
http://www.ickes.us/machine-embrodiery/totes

--  
Beverly
http://www.ickes.us


Re: Passing along Sewing Skills

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Pretty, as everything you do! As for DGD, I should think that there won't be  
any time for sewing if she's really into studying. Juilliard isn't the most  
famous musical school for nothing, and although she is brilliant, no doubt,  
she will have to work hard to keep up with her fellow students. At least it  
should be so, otherwise the school isn't worth a fig. ;-) (Just my 2  
cents...)

U. - I loved the challenge during my one-year schooling for foreign language  
secretary; all the stuff I had never heard of before, like matters of trade,  
finance and insurance. Just the right kick for my brain around my  
mid-thirties. ;-)
  


Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
Ursula Schrader wrote:
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Thanks!

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Oh, she knows she is in for a challenge. Fortunately, she is very  
self disciplined, and has done well both academically and musically.

She will have to save sewing for breaks, she'll be back here for  
almost a month over Christmas.

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I keep meaning to compliment you on your excellent English skills.  
Most folks would never guess English is not your first language from  
your posts here.  Your spelling, grammar, punctuation and syntax are  
excellent.  I am envious of your proficiency!

--  
Beverly
http://www.ickes.us




Re: Passing along Sewing Skills

--  
Beverly
http://www.ickes.us

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Passing along Sewing Skills

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<snip>
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Oh how I envy folks with self discipline. I feel that, up to a certain  
point, you can learn it but the core of it is either founded in your  
character or you have been taught by self-disciplined people (don't know  
exactly which). I lack it totally, I'm afraid, and, what pains me most, thus  
I cannot teach it to my DD.

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Tell her to choose a project she can look forward to. Or rather not. If I  
just start thinking about a project, my mind starts galloping away on that  
trail and I'm useless for other things. ;-) On the other hand, she might  
cope better with it...

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Thank you! I'm doing my best. <blush>

U.  


Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
Ursula Schrader wrote:
<snip>
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I am the world's worst procrastinator.  I know it about myself, but  
seem constitutionally unable to change.  At 75+ it's not likely to  
ever happen .<sigh>


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Although she has made several stunning outfits for herself, much of  
her sewing is replicating costumes for fictional characters from  
movies and TV shows, AKA "cosplay".  
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosplay I expect she'll come home with  
a boatload of ideas for things she wants to make.

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Your best is superior to many native-English speakers, trust me.

--  
Beverly
http://www.ickes.us



Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
On Thu, 21 Aug 2014 00:17:51 -0700, "BEI Design"

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Wow that is beautiful. Love the note about making my own reeds, my
sond also did when he played. You do such nice work.

Re: Passing along Sewing Skills
snipped-for-privacy@not.HE wrote:
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<snip>
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Thanks so much!  I borrowed the idea for the text, I had read it  
somewhere.  She loved it.

--  
Beverly
http://www.ickes.us


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