all-purpoe flour

I want to use one of my favorite scone recipes, which calls for
all-purpose flour, but I am currently living in New Zealand, where they
don't have any such thing - only cake flour and high grade (bread)
flour. I understand all purpose flour is a mix of the two. Does anyone
know what the correct proportions would be? Should I use half and half?
thanks,
Fay
Reply to
Fay Wouk
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The flour in a scone recipe is mostly inconsequential. It is the mixing method, 99%.
Provided you are talking about the same scones as I, like our biscuits,=20 just sweet, triangle shape, like they are served in the tea houses in=20 Victoria B.C..
A little gluten in the flour there is definitely desireable, because the =
dough is made up like a rubbed piedough, just much wetter. The gluten will help make the layers, with the butter and method.
BTW, there has to be an All Purpose flour, even down under, they do cook =
with a flour, make soups, sauces, etc., don't they? Or is it mint jelly with the lamb all the way?
--=20 Sincerly,
C=3D=A6-)=A7 H. W. Hans Kuntze, CMC, S.g.K. (_o_)
formatting link
, chefcmcchef.com"Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it Happened"_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/=20
Reply to
H. W. Hans Kuntze
Don't they have "flour" in the stores? What do you get when you walk into a supermarket and ask for 5 pounds or 2 kilos of flour?
Barry
Reply to
barry
You can buy plain flour as that is available in both New Zealand and Australia. If not just tell the strorekeeper you want ordinary flour. I am not worried about the bread flour of those areas as they are lower in protein quality than the north american flours. Look ,bakers in those areas usually add gluten if they made bread with their bakers flour meaning that their flour quality is medium gluten type in the same range as all purpoe flour.
Flour in those areas are of thiese types, BAkers Flour 11% protein, Seldom reach 12% in most areas. Biscuit flour and pastry flour 9-9.5% protein High ratio cake flour 8-9% protein wholemeal flour 12-13% protein wheat meal flour or 90% whole meal and 10% bakers flour;this latter flour is a finer granulation than the normal wholemeal. Roy
Reply to
Roy Basan
In article ,
There is high-grade, which is for bread, and standard, which I was told by a local is for cake. As far as I know, those are the choices.
Fay
Reply to
Fay Wouk
In article ,
Yes, that is what I'm talking about.
Well, I'm perfectly happy to mix my two types of flour, so as to have some gluten, but I'd like to know what proportions to use.
Well, there's nothing called all purpose, and I was told one was for bread and the other for cake. I don't know which one most people use for making gravy. I use the standard (cake) flour, myself.
Reply to
Fay Wouk
I've checked several substitution lists, and none of them suggest adding bread flour to your cake flour. Instead, they suggest for every cup of all-purpose flour, use 1 cup, plus two tbls. of cake flour. Hope this works for you.
Reply to
tmnoland
That should work in terms of equivalent weight. That is, the weight of 1 cup +2 TBS. cake flour = 1 cup of AP flour. It doesn't approximate the protein content of the AP flour. There are other qualitative differences such as particle size and pH.
Reply to
Vox Humana
What you are calling "cake flour" may in fact be what is often called "plain flour" in the UK, Australia and New Zealand. There used to be 3 flours available to the average housewife in those countries: plain, self-raising and bread. The plain would be the equivalent of North American All-Purpose. Anyway, what have you got to lose by trying the "cake" flour? Just a dollar's worth of flour and an hour in the kitchen. Graham
Reply to
graham
For an "emergency" substitute for pastry flour, I was told in school to substitute all purpose flour. Or, not having that, equal parts by weight of bread flour and cake flour. I have done this, with good results. As for gravies (and roux as well), you want the starch as your thickening agent, so use cake (low protien) flour.
Reply to
chef_riggy

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