cross stitch

"me" ( snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com) writes:
(snip)>
I do pretty well all my patterns from computer generation, which are noted for their "confetti" stitches. My record was a line of 17 stitches, each one of which was a different colour. Do you know how to do loop starts? If not ask, and someone will tell you. What I do is to count how many stitches there are of the next colour, and cut enough floss to do that many stitches. Use a loop start, and the backs will look just fine. I ALWAYS do as much as I can by half stitches out, and then complete the stitches on return. I find I can preserve the tension better than one stitch at a time. The terminology I use is one stitch at a time is the English method; half stitches out, complete on the way back, Danish method. I have no idea why.
Reply to
F.James Cripwell
Jim,
Do you perhaps know.........or, does anyone know, approximately....
Using 2 stands of thread and a loop start, how many stitches can you get out of 1 DMC skein, assuming solid coverage?
mag, Oregon
Reply to
Mag
The loop start is wonderful and I use it when I'm feeling perfectionistic about my back sides (the embroidery ones!!). But here's a question to you all. Say you have a chart with sky with stars or snowflakes consisting of a single XS (and I mean lots of 'em)-Do you really start a new piece of thread for each one? I do, sometimes; other times I say "the hell with it"!! And I guess you could say depends on how easy it is to see through the fabric.. I have seen photos on commercial booklets in which it was very obvious the stitcher jumped from star to star without ending off each time....amazing for a model. Love to get your input! Sister (& fellow) American stitchers---> have a safe & sane Fourth of July.. Marilyn In North Bend, OR
Reply to
M.Safier
This piece doesn't have a back that's going to win any blue ribbons (probably not even any chartreuse ribbons) but it will be framed and will look fine.
Lucille
Reply to
Lucille
Jim:
IIRC, English samplers generally use the one stitch at a time. When Ginnie Thompson brought Danish cross-stitch to North America (or at least popularized it), the out and back method was what she taught. Darlene O'Steen in her "The Perfect Stitch" tends to use the one stitch at a time, and variations on it.
You were here when there was quite the blow up about this.:) Supposedly the one at a time makes for a longer lasting stitch,(in terms of 100 plus years!) but I find that like you, the out and back method, creates a smoother line.
MargW
Reply to
MargW
I've done both, but when I was model stitching and wanted to have nothing showing, I used a technique that I learned in a class taught by Shay Pendray.
Take a tiny stitch at the location of the single x, then stitch your x over it; finally, run you thread under the back of the stitch several times and snip off. I've never had one come loose, and I've even used this method for stitching beads. Note: this doesn't work with slippery rayon which can come loose from even the best stitching unless you can run it under a number of stitches.
MargW
Reply to
MargW
For slippery rayon, I use a single thread and leave a tail about half an inch long at the start. I stitch the first leg of the cross twice (making two 'plies') and then the second leg twice, cutting the thread to leave a second tail of about half an inch. Finally, I use a pair of fine tweezers and a tiny crochet hook to tie a reef knot with the two tails. Depending on the piece and whether the background is white, I might either run the two tails under the neighbouring stitches (the crochet hook helps here) or simply tighten the reef knot and cut the tails short. If you were feeling really nervous, you could plop a little bit of glue on the back of the stitch to hold it.
I know lots of people would faint at this method, but it works for me! ;-D
Reply to
Trish Brown
One stitch at a time is always (?) recommended when using overdyed threads, so as to best capture the usually subtle variations. Or is this too obvious to most? My budget doesn't always permit buying the gorgeous overdyed threads, so I sometimes substitute DMC, luckily I have lots of Weeks Dye Works & Needle Necessities from richer times...of course they are the "older colors and now there are even brands (lines) I don't even recognize since I have taken a "crochet sabbatical" for at least 10 years now... Marilyn
Reply to
M.Safier
What's your fabric count? It's in the thousands, but obviously, you'll get a lot more stitches on 22-count than on 6-count. :)
For the purpose Jim used, cutting enough thread to do the next batch of stitches, for the actual stitching you'll need roughly 5" of floss to do 1" of stitches (i.e., 5" = 14 stitches on 14-count fabric).
Of course, since some of us have next to no wastage (loop starts to begin and stitching down to that last 1/4") and others do a 3" away waste knot and end off when they still have 3" in the needle, you'll have to figure your own "fudge factor" for that both when cutting your floss and when figuring your "miles per gallon".
Although the skein is 8.7 yards, I use 8-even for my calculations to allow for wastage (which actually gives me some bonus stitches because I don't waste that much). Hence: 8 x 36" = 288 inches x 3 sets-of-2-strands = 864 usable inches / 5" of floss per 1" of stitches = 172.8 x 14-count = ~2400 on 14-count
Reply to
Karen C - California
"M.Safier" wrote ..
Not always, although as you say it is the best way to appreciate the colour variations. But I have also seem them used in the "stitch out and back" was for a sort of tweed effect, or deliberately used in short rows, or used in spirals when stitchng a circular shape. And then there are the precise and patient people who cut them into very specific lengths, so that they can stitch motifs , control light and dark areas, or only use some of the colour tones. They really lend themselves to experimenting.
Dawne
Reply to
Dawne Peterson
I made some very colorful mixes by mixing 2 threads each of 3 different colors , thus getting a 6 thread stitch with very interesting results ..
Also mixing 2 varigated threads with 4 monochromatic threads , is facinating ,, I also xst one set of x with one color , than stich an other x in a different direction with another color , sometimes threading the upper one over part of the underone ,,, Nice games as the heart goes, mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
Thank you all so much for your replies- and Hi Dianne(L)- they have been very helpful. I think I may have to work on a doodle cloth , and invest in a collection of tapestry needles.
I saw laddering(i think it was this word) to refer to something to do with cross stitch and smoothing the floss, but don;t remember any more what the post s aid you actually did.
I can't imagine changing color every stitch for any length and not having a mess on the back.......i would love to see someone in person doing all this stuff.
There are some big stitching venues relatively close by-within 50 miles at any rate-i will have to keep an eye out for them.
thanks again... ktj
Reply to
me
"Mag" ( snipped-for-privacy@verizoncat.net) writes:
I am a scientist, so I tend to like numbers, and approach my stitching scientifically. I have tried to sell the idea of calculating how much floss one needs to finish a project before it has ever been stitched. No-one is interested in the slightest, even though I am convinced it is easy to do. Involved in this is, of course, how many stitches can you get from a skein of floss. The answer is, it varies enormously, by something like a factor of three. Sometimes you can get as few as 900; other times 2700, on 32 count even weave, 2 over 2. But a figure of about 1800 at 14 or 16 stitches to the inch, 2 over 2, is a good approximation.
Reply to
F.James Cripwell
me says...
I first heard about laddering here and asked one of my 3D stitching friends to demonstrate it. You bring the needle from the back to the front in between the strands of the previous stitch.
Reply to
anne
Railroading is used for keeping the floss from twisting. It is performed by inserting the needle between the threads as you stitch.
There are also laying tools which are used to keep the floss smooth, which can be anything from a tapestry needle to exotic carved wood.
Perhaps you got the terms confused? Or, it is used differently in another country?
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
Anne, that's railroading, and it can be from front to back or back to front. If your stitching friends are calling it laddering, they are confusing terms. Laddering looks like a ladder. Railroading separates two strands of floss.
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski

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