I have a question about backing material


I'm in the process of making a 'scrappy' quilt. I have enough backing
fabric to run the seam horizontally across the middle but not enough
to use it vertically with it seamed on each side. Every book I've
read says never do a horizontal seam on the back. Is this just for
visual appeal or is there another reason like shrinkage or something?
If it's just for looks, I can live with a horizontal seam...if it's
for another reason, I'll have to find a Plan B backing fabric. Thank
you, Donna
Reply to
dealer83
I see no reason why a horizontal seam would be structurally less sound than a vertical one, but I would use a slightly more generous seam allowance than 1/4". TANQP
Lizzy
Reply to
Lizzy Taylor
Yeah, what Lizzy said. Also, no matter how tempted you are to leave the selvedges, don't do it. They will shrink/pull a little or a lot. I have seen some otherwise nice patterns for heirloom baby gowns that encouraged cutting the opening with the selvedge so the facing wouldn't have to be finished. Bad idea. Polly
"Lizzy Taylor" <
Reply to
Polly Esther
i've done a few with horizontal seams, but have learned to quilt them turning the whole sandwich on it's side. then the quilt doesn't pucker as much. amy in CNY
Reply to
amy in CNY
I thought that advice was for quilts that will be hanging vertically - basically show quilts, or wall hangings I guess, I think it's to avoid sagging.
I've seen instructions to make quilters width fabric into a wider backing with diagonal seams. I have friends who piece every scrap left from the front into the back - no one has complained of it causing a problem.
So I guess it depends on what you are planning to do with the quilt.
Cheers Anne
Reply to
Anne Rogers
If you are having it "long-armed" you might be wise to check with your quilter. At least some long-armers do not like vertically seamed backings, because then the seam makes a ridge in the rolled up quilt. I may not have explained it well, so just check with your quilter...
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN
Thanks Julia....I'm going to quilt this myself, so that won't be a problem. I appreciate your insight though and will remember that for ones I send out. Donna
Reply to
dealer83
IMO it has to do with how you might usually fold the quilt. One of the folds often goes down the middle in each direction.
If you have enough fabric, you might consider this method:
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down to "diagonal pieced quilt back". Using this depends a loton the design of your backing -stripes might not work well. Also, youlose 2 triangles'-worth of fabric. But it's very clever for makingthat seam less visible.Roberta in D
Reply to
Roberta
I've done horizontal seams, in fact, on a quilt I use and wash often. Looks great after many washings. Go for it!
Sherry
Reply to
Sherry
Thanks for mentioning the (ultimate) folding of the quilt. For that reason, I suggest the horizontal seam be off center if possible. FWIW, my QOV Bee uses the horizontal seam on 99% of the quilts we make. We remove the selvedges and use a wider seam, backstitching here and there. The long arm quilters are fine with this. In fact, the long arm quilters here usually set the project into the frame so the backing seam is a bit off center, if the size allows, unless there is a design consideration. We wash finished quilts and they wash up nicely. We make sturdy quilts, so are confident they will hold up in use. HTH. Pat in Virginia PS: I have never used the diagonal seam method in the Flynn site. Any comments from the crew here?

Reply to
Pat in Virginia
I've used Flynn's diagonal seam quite often. It works especially well when your backing is just a few inches too narrow, as it really is a fabric saver there. He has a formula for calculating the amount of fabric you need. I put the formula in a spread sheet, so all I have to do is enter the length and width of my quilt and the width of my backing fabric.
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN
I often use a horizontal seam on quilts less than 72" long because two widths of fabric are a perfect fit. I do not remove the salvage until the seam has been sewn. The salvage makes it easier to match the edges. I sew a one inch seam then trim off the salvage and press the seam allowance flat. The salvages on the top and bottom are cut off after quilting when the backing is trimmed.
Susan
Reply to
Susan Laity Price
Ive just cut a backing using the Flynn method, but to make it even wider I'm inserting a strip of blocks made with the left over pieces from the front. Seems to be working ok, and it looks planned.
I was a bit scared when I cut the diagonal, but it works beautifully.
Method is at:
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about halfway down the page.
Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~uk
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Reply to
Sally Swindells
Excellent, Susan. Trimming afterwards certainly would make matching as well as seriously stabilizing good, good. I can remember that. Polly
"Susan Laity Price" I often use a horizontal seam on quilts less than 72" long because two
Reply to
Polly Esther
I have actually used it. Had a piece that was just a few inches too short, but plenty wide, so I boldly sliced as Flynn describes and it worked perfectly. Roberta in D
Reply to
Roberta
Donna, if it's going to be quilted on a frame, it's much BETTER to have a horizontal seam. A vertical seam rolls over and over on itself and creates uneven tension. Another thing to try is John Flynn's diagonal method. Nothing rolls on itself or folds on itself. It usually saves a little fabric, too. The formula looks a little complicated, but I have a spreadsheet that you just plug backing length and width into. I'd be glad to email it to you (or anyone) if you'd like .
--Heidi
formatting link

Reply to
heidi (was rabbit2b)
Yes,I will share. I've got it in .123 format. I assume you probably want .xls, so I'll convert it for you. Hopefully it will convert correctly.
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN

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