A special hem

I need to show a great niece how to do a heirloom level dress hem - you
know, the one where you only pick up one vertical thread per stitch. Of
course, I can't do it in person. Isn't it painful that our young people are
so far away? So. Wondering if there's a You Tube or something that will
show her how? Please help if you can aim me. Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther
When I learned to do this I wore the drug store classes that made everything appear larger and I got a pretty strong pair that I keep at the sm to help thread the needles. I had read about hemming this way in a book.===I do a lot of reading! ;) Barbara in HOT SC
Reply to
Bobbie Sews More
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If you can get a copy, Claire Shaeffer's "Couture Sewing Techniques" is fabulous:
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I haven't see the updated revised edition:
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But I'm sure it's equally good.
NAYY
Reply to
BEI Design
I was really hoping for a video ( is that what it's called nowadays?) of the technique and looked at some demonstrations on U-tube. Good gracious. Apparently you can demonstrate online even if you don't really know how. One nice lady was turning up an inch and then turning it up again. Mercy. Why don't I just buy the great niece a staple gun or a roll of duct tape? Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther
Speaking of duct tape-----do you realize there is a HEM TAPE so you can iron on your hem? Directions are on the package. I'm thinking that WalMart has it, so cloth stores must have it too. I read up on some of this stuff when I'm in the store. Barbara in WET SC It's raining now.
Reply to
Bobbie Sews More
Polly, look for embroiderers doing the same stitch you're trying to teach. They usually do a much better job.
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is pretty good, though I'd fold the top of the hem back again for hidden stitching. That's my standard stitch for a blind hem, even though I learned it as herringbone back in the early Jurassic. The other thing about sewing videos is that the older they are, the more likely they're showing someone doing it correctly. (If you really want to shudder, there's a "tutorial" around someplace where you're advised to stretch the armscye to fit the sleeve cap when sewing.)
Judy Barlup (a very good tailoring teacher) has an "extra fine fusing tape" from Japan that I like. It's very narrow and nearly weightless, unlike the heat and bond stuff I think Walmart carries. I told her I'd used it to hem a satin dress -- 15 minutes before a wedding (substitute, shorter bridesmaid when #1 developed stomach flu) -- and she told me that she wasn't sure you could go to heaven if you did a lot of hems with it.
Kay
Reply to
Kay Lancaster
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Thanks for posting this information! I usually only sew very casual clothes for DGD, or me, to play in, and I have the hem tape but don't think I've ever used it. Barbara in SC
Reply to
Bobbie Sews More
I'm sure God has a special exception for any one rescuing a bride 15 minutes before a wedding. I went in to hug the bride/new daughter-in-law and saw a seamstress at her feet with about 300 safety pins. I didn't ask. I just hugged and left. Quietly. Polly
"Kay Lancaster" Polly, look for embroiderers doing the same stitch you're trying to teach. They usually
Reply to
Polly Esther
Here you go:
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Make sure that she knows about the importance of, and therefore uses, beeswax on the thread she uses for hemming.
Reply to
Farm1
"Kay Lancaster" wrote in message
(If you really want to shudder, there's a "tutorial" around someplace
Really? Do you know the URL as I'd like to shudder at that myself.
Reply to
Farm1
Good plan. I've been pulled out of a church pew several times over the years for emergency clothing surgery. The worst was probably the time the groom's suit pants hadn't had the seat sewn -- somehow they'd managed to leave it just basted -- and it wasn't noticed until The Day. I think that might have been the fastest backstitching I ever did.
Oh well, I was frazzled enough before mine that I nearly flea-moussed my hair. ;-)
And all those little oopsies make a great story -- years later.
Kay
Reply to
Kay Lancaster
I don't, sorry. Someone showed it to me, and after that trauma, I forgot the URL. It was one of those "reconstructed t-shirts" sorts of things.
Reply to
Kay Lancaster
An easy way to learn "how to" do this hem is to use a large weave fabric to catch on to the "how." Like maybe get a 1/4 yard of burlap and learn to do the hem on this. or anything with a big weave. Hope this helps! Barbara in SC
Reply to
Bobbie Sews More
I just must come back to a 'special' hem one more time. There is just nothing - well, maybe there's lots - but an obvious ugly klutzy hem will destroy the appearance of an otherwise well-made garment. I like to finish the top edge - either with a gentle serge or zigzag. I do not turn it under. I sneak down about 1/2 inch or more and do my nearly invisible hemming by whatever name you call it. I catch only one vertical thread with silk thread as I go along. When finished, I can slip a piece of plain old brown paper bag under the edge of the serged edge and steam press. The results? An absolutely special hem. Totally unnecessary for a bride who's going to have Her Special Wedding Day every 2 or three years but well worth the trouble for an heirloom. Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther

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