bernina 950 industrial

The stars are in alignment, finally the money, and the machine at an
affordable price have aligned. I have ordered the machine , it's 2nd
hand and from a service centre. i just have to await it's arrival with
much impatience. Oh and re-arrange my workspace to fit it in!!!!
I hope it's ok. Anyone used one already? any opinions.
Reply to
Claire Owen
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"Claire Owen" schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:kk5ivs$s7m$ snipped-for-privacy@news.datemas.de...
Oh, I feel with you. Meanwhile, my darling Aurora 440 QE has returned home to me but I didn't find the time to try it yet. Have fun with yours!
U.
Reply to
Ursula Schrader
So Exciting I have just had an email saying it was collected on saturday morning. It's making it's way to me.
Reply to
Claire Owen
"Claire Owen" schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:kkghgs$l9g$ snipped-for-privacy@news.datemas.de...
Oh, so great! I tried to reply to your personal mail but it got back as Mailer Daemon... Never mind, It looks like a very fine machine. Did you get the model with a table?
U.
Reply to
Ursula Schrader
Yes, It's like this
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That's the one I have purchased. I'm really am soo chuffed. I have a Bernina 1030 which i had for my 21st birthday, a good few years ago now. It still sews well but every year when I take it to be serviced the repair guy reminds me that it wasn't intended to work as hard as I make it work. This one will still give me the variety of stitches but with a moteur than can cope with my workload.
Reply to
Claire Owen
"Claire Owen" schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:kkj30e$fat$ snipped-for-privacy@news.datemas.de...
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> That's the one I have purchased. I'm really am soo chuffed. I have a > Bernina 1030 which i had for my 21st birthday, a good few years ago now. > It still sews well but every year when I take it to be serviced the repair > guy reminds me that it wasn't intended to work as hard as I make it work. > This one will still give me the variety of stitches but with a moteur than > can cope with my workload. Yes, that one looks good. And, to be honest, one hardly needs all the fancy stitches. What is really useful in my 440 QE is the buttonhole automatic program. Make one perfect one and then just position the fabric, put down your foot on the lever and off it goes, a hundred times if you want to. Does your new one have something similar? And, of course, a good motor is IT! ;-)
U.
Reply to
Ursula Schrader
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>>
The straight stitch is a must for sure but the next most important stitch for me is satin stitch which i found out how to achieve on my 1030 by looking at where the machine plotted itself for a button hole. Bernina have a 5 step button hole system which I have got used to after all this time. I think this Bernina uses the same system as my 1030. I am hoping this machine also does needle up in stop position as i have also become adapted to that.
I have been getting ready for my big spring flower market on the 27th and 28th. 42 reversible dresses done about 10 string tie shoulder dresses, next are flower shaped bibs and I also need to up my general stock of aprons and dungarees. I made a great apron yesterday afternoon with a super embroidered pirate that my mum did for me on the pocket. A nice change from flowers
Reply to
Claire Owen
:The straight stitch is a must for sure but the next most important :stitch for me is satin stitch which i found out how to achieve on my :1030 by looking at where the machine plotted itself for a button hole. :Bernina have a 5 step button hole system which I have got used to after :all this time. I think this Bernina uses the same system as my 1030. :I am hoping this machine also does needle up in stop position as i have :also become adapted to that.
Nope, it's just a gussied up mechanical machine driven by a clutch motor. No needle postioning, nor particularly accurate speed control. No adjustable foot pressure, either. You could replace the motor with a less victorian servo motor, including one with a sensor for needle positioning, but that'll cost you a couple hundred bucks (more, if you have to have a mehanic do it.) for a motor and sensor, probably not worth it.
I've seen a number of these mounted on tables without a work light, which is pretty worthless. If your's doesn't have one, a new one is cheap enough. If it does have one, it's likely to be a low-voltage, low wattage one, driven off a motor tap. It's easy and worth while to put a normal plug end on the light's cord, and use a regular house holc bulb, which most lamps will use. (At least in the US; I don't know if there are different bulb screw threads in France, but if a normal bulb fits, it's a huge improvement.
Reply to
David Scheidt
that's worth knowing, thank you. We have both screw and bayonet fittings here for light bulbs. The needle position will be a mystery until I get to play. Thanks for your input, useful.
Reply to
Claire Owen
The reason for the low voltage high intensity bulb is the heat. A regular bulb will take the skin off your hand if you touch the lamp shield after it has been on for even a short period of time.
Reply to
Ron Anderson
Claire, if you need better lighting than is provided on the machine, take a look at IKEA's "JANSJÖ"
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Costs 9,99 ?.
The gooseneck is long enough that you can aim the light *exactly* where you need it, but the base stays out of the way of feeding fabric through the machine. The light is very white and bright. I have one at each of my machines. The on/off switch is cord mounted about a foot from the base, I wrap the excess cord around the base, so that the switch is easy to locate.
NAYY,
Reply to
BEI Design
"BEI Design" schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:kkmf2b$uq$ snipped-for-privacy@dont-email.me...
I've got one of those, no, actually two, here as well. One's at DD's bedside so that doesn't count, I guess. The other one is fixed on the shelf behind our couch, to light my needlework in the evenings if TV is a mere background and needs no visual attention (should I call it a background drone?) It's really great because the light is so focussed that even DH's view on the screen isn't impaired by the reflection. However, if you look at it from an eco point of view: you cannot change the 'bulb'. Once the little LED is worn out, the whole thing has to go. On the other hand, these LEDs are pretty long lived, so I had no qualms to buy two of them and ponder even getting more (and very likely other parts of it will wear out first, I fear). NAYY, too. ;-)
U.
Reply to
Ursula Schrader
:>> :>> :The straight stitch is a must for sure but the next most important :>> :stitch for me is satin stitch which i found out how to achieve on my :>> :1030 by looking at where the machine plotted itself for a button hole. :>> :Bernina have a 5 step button hole system which I have got used to after :>> :all this time. I think this Bernina uses the same system as my 1030. :>> :I am hoping this machine also does needle up in stop position as i have :>> :also become adapted to that. :>> :>> Nope, it's just a gussied up mechanical machine driven by a clutch :>> motor. No needle postioning, nor particularly accurate speed control. :>> No adjustable foot pressure, either. You could replace the motor with :>> a less victorian servo motor, including one with a sensor for needle :>> positioning, but that'll cost you a couple hundred bucks (more, if you :>> have to have a mehanic do it.) for a motor and sensor, probably not :>> worth it. :>> :>> I've seen a number of these mounted on tables without a work light, :>> which is pretty worthless. If your's doesn't have one, a new one is :>> cheap enough. If it does have one, it's likely to be a low-voltage, :>> low wattage one, driven off a motor tap. It's easy and worth while to :>> put a normal plug end on the light's cord, and use a regular house :>> holc bulb, which most lamps will use. (At least in the US; I don't :>> know if there are different bulb screw threads in France, but if a :>> normal bulb fits, it's a huge improvement. :>> :>> :>> :> that's worth knowing, thank you. We have both screw and bayonet fittings :> here for light bulbs. :> The needle position will be a mystery until I get to play. Thanks for your :> input, useful. :> :> -- :> Claire in Montreal FRANCE :>
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:The reason for the low voltage high intensity bulb is the heat. A regular :bulb will take the skin off your hand if you touch the lamp shield after it :has been on for even a short period of time.
Not an issue with a 15 or 25W CFL.
The heat argument is bull anyway, if people would supply something other than cheapest junk fixtures. Plenty of suitable fixtures available, and have been for decades. They cost more than the junk fitted to most tables, of course.
Reply to
David Scheidt
Well it was delivered yesterday lunchtime. As regards the lamp it has none. There is an obvious place where a classic bulb would go on the sewing machine LH side if you unscrew the side plate , at the moment I have attached one of the clip on spot lamps I use from the market stalls. I have attached it to the cone holder and angled it down . That's fine for the moment. The ikea lamp looks to be a good solution but Ikea here is 2 hours away and in an area I hardly ever go to so the spot light will do until I find myself in that part of the country.
As regards the machine, it's fast. I have to retrain myself to it. I ended up doing the strait stitch embroidery on my 1030 as before on the 2 dresses i made yesterday as it just ran away and I couldn't stop exactly where I planned but i think that user practice will cure that after a while. My husband says it sounds like a machine gun when the stitches go in. I find the hand turning the wheel a bit stiff to get moving but judicious jiggling of the foot pedal seems to get it going. Now I need to order round needles just when I re ordered 100 flat sided needles and try to source some more bobbins. of they are a different size to what I use on the other Bernina. i made two dresses, a bib with sleeves and 4 flower bibs yesterday on it so over all she and I are getting on. It's the beginning of a solid friendship
Reply to
Claire Owen
:Well it was delivered yesterday lunchtime. As regards the lamp it has :none. There is an obvious place where a classic bulb would go on the :sewing machine LH side if you unscrew the side plate , at the moment I :have attached one of the clip on spot lamps I use from the market :stalls. I have attached it to the cone holder and angled it down . :That's fine for the moment. The ikea lamp looks to be a good solution :but Ikea here is 2 hours away and in an area I hardly ever go to so the :spot light will do until I find myself in that part of the country.
:As regards the machine, it's fast. I have to retrain myself to it. I :ended up doing the strait stitch embroidery on my 1030 as before on the :2 dresses i made yesterday as it just ran away and I couldn't stop :exactly where I planned but i think that user practice will cure that :after a while. My husband says it sounds like a machine gun when the :stitches go in. :I find the hand turning the wheel a bit stiff to get moving but :judicious jiggling of the foot pedal seems to get it going.
If it's got a clutch motor set up the way they almost all are, pushing on the front of the pedal (opposite of where you push to make it go) will engage a brake, and should stop quickly. you may also find it useful to play around with the height of the pedal at rest, and which hole on the clutch arm the rod attaches to.
Reply to
David Scheidt
.
I didn't realise that it's a good tip thank you.It helps quite a bit. I had another afternoon sewing yesterday and I am getting better. I do find the tension changes , particularly when I get near the end of a bobbin. but that could also be due to using different thickness's of fabric. I am still learning.
My mastery of the machine is a work in progress but overall I am very pleased. Photo of machine in place here.
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Reply to
Claire Owen

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