what's he gotses in his pocketes?

Sorry, just had to channel a little Gollum.
Just washed 4 batches of denim and heavy cotton for projects to be.
Just started laying out a shirt last night, the white seersucker.
Got my sights set on one of those japanese field jackets with some of
this heavy textured cotton I have (its sort of a 1/2" 3D grid, not a
good description I guess).
Some of the other is pinstriped denim, for shirts. One batch is really
heavy denim, but with white threads randomly scattered throughout.
Almost looks like some indigo ikat, which is why I got it.
Now, about pockets. I've only done one, and it looks like someone's
first pocket. I posted about this before, years ago.
Its the only part of a shirt that is not held in place by another edge.
Its a damned patch, and can go askew any number of ways, but mostly
I'm worried about uneven edges, particularly if there's a v shape to the
pocket bottom. I fantasized years ago about using some thin metal to
help form the pocket (starch it, iron it on the metal pattern, then
place it on the shirt). And these days, I have some metal sitting
around that would work perfect for that.
Any pointers on pockets?
Reply to
Taunto
There's a fab book called Just Pockets:
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I have a pocket forming gadget like this:
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(Scroll down to the pocket template)You could experiment with a piece of thin card cut to size and shape to press the fabric round. These days I just eyeball it: simple patch pockets on shirts are just another of those things that come with lots of practice, but a neat card template is a good helping hand to start with.
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
On Mar 8, 12:01 am, Kate XXXXXX wrote:
this:
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(Scroll> down to the pocket template)I think I've seen those before. With the card stock, which I think I tried, I think I was running into problems from the liquid starch spray. Perhaps the two should not be used together.
Dwight
Reply to
d.s.
I'd try letting the starch dry fully and then using steam to set the creases. Mind you, I never bother with the starch, and the creases seem to work just fine.
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
I just have asbestos fingers! ;)
Nah - it just comes with practice. You know the how, so just take it slowly.
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
If you're going to use spray starch, spray some in the cap, and then dab a line of it around the template's edge with a small artist's brush, then press, using the tip of the iron.
A sneaky way to get a small edge turned over is to mark the seamline on the wrong side of the fabric, place over another piece of waste fabric and stitch, using water-soluble thread on the bobbin. Trim seam allowances after sewing to the size you want on the finished object. Turn inside out, clipping curves as needed, and press with a dry iron. Work out the corners with a bamboo turner or a point turner or whatever till you're happy with the shape of the object. Give it a good blast of steam to dissolve the thread and pull the sewing thread, discard the waste fabric, and press again with a dry iron.
If you're needing two identical templeted shapes, like pockets... skip the waste fabric, cut two, sew with the w/s thread, turn and press as before.
Kay
Reply to
Kay Lancaster
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This is very unfinished, but the section on patch pockets isreasonably complete. Corrections & questions solicited.
Joy Beeson
Reply to
Joy Beeson
Another sneaky way to get a really crisp fold over is to sew where you want the fold. I machine baste on the fold line. Then if I hold everything taut while pressing, the fabric will almost always fold perfectly on that basting line. For the point at the bottom of a pocket, don't turn the corner. Baste along each edge of the pocket piece separately. So down the side from top to bottom. Across one diagonal edge from side to point. Repeat for the other two sides. It all works wonderfully with a little bit of practice. I also leave thread tails long enough to hold onto.
I'm also a big fan of metal pressing aids. I have the EZY Hem.
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use that a lot for pressing hems, even on pockets. ;) You can do thesame sort of thing with a metal ruler, so long as it's thin enough to foldthe fabric over. The advantage of metal vs. cardboard is that it will holdsome of the heat in there while you press. As long as the fabric can takeHot, it will help give you a really sharp crease. Sharon
Reply to
mamahays
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Oh, I love that! :) Not sure I'd want to cut it up to make a shirt, but I would surely have fun with it!
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
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Well, I don't think I"m going to make a skirt with it.
Reply to
Taunto

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