Termite Tool

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Hello, William. In this case, Google search is your friend. Find this newsgroup with Google, and you can search just about any aspect of any topic of woodturning you like quite easily. I always sort by date to make the info the most current.
Here's the results including ancillary discussions searching "termite tool":
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Good luck!
Robert
Reply to
nailshooter41
Hello Bill,
The Termite Tool is a good tool. I've had one for many years. If you are not careful with the application of the tool, you can get some massive catches. They cost a bit more, but the new carbide hollowing tools using a special carbide disk cutter are more user friendly and the cutting edge lasts a long time. There are two tools on the market: The Hunter Tool, which is sold by Woodcraft, and the Eliminator made by Jack McDaniel, which is sold by Packard Woodworks. They are both excellent tools. The McDaniel tool has a large shaft (3/4" diameter) and has milled flats to ensure that you hold the tool in the right position for effective cutting.
I have reviewed all of the tools at some time of the other in More Woodturning. The believe that I reviewed the Eliminator in the December 2006 issue and have an updated review in the March-April 2007 issue to be published the last of this month.
The real key on these ring and hook tools is application of the cutting edge at a 45 degree angle.
Fred Holder
Reply to
Fred Holder
Bill The Termite is an excellent tool for what it is designed, that is hollowing end grain turnings. The learning curve is not for the faint of heart but worth it. I, personally, like hook tools which are the father of this tool, using a hook instead of a ring. Take a look at my web site for some information about making a hook tool and for using it.
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Hope this helps. If you do not want to make your own hooks, I would buy the Termite tip and make the shaft and handle.
Reply to
Darrell Feltmate
You can practice a bit with a fingernail grind on your gouge, making the dimple and cutting out, or dropping the left wing under center, peeling in on a cross-grain bowl, or raising it and cutting out on an undercut as the old ring tool users did. Some people find this so convenient they seldom reach for the termite except for trimming the very end grain portions of long-grain turnings.
Reply to
George
If you do a lot of hollow work, yes.. I have done a number of hollow vessels and covered boxes where the grain runs parallel to the axis of the lathe, in oak and other woods. The termite really eats the wood, and is fairly forgiving on grabs.
I highly recommend it.
On Tue, 06 Feb 2007 14:36:15 GMT, "William Hall" wrote:
Reply to
Bradford Chaucer
I've very briefly played with the termite. and I've read a lot of story's about the catches. Crown make a tool called the beaver, Lee Valley sell it, it has a guard of sorts over the top that helps control depth of cut and make those catches far less dangerous. You can get a better tool at a comparable price. If price isn't an issue, take a look at the munro hollower or the hollowers wood-cut tools offer.
Reply to
woodturningcreature

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