Darn it!

It would appear that there are enough lurkers on this newsgroup to
hold a conversation after all -- all it needs is for each of us to
start a thread.
So -- do your hand-knits get worn enough to require repair? If so,
what is your favorite method?
I have picked up stitches and knit new toes onto socks, but I've never
done the bit where you ravel a hole rectangular, pick up stitches and
knit a patch, then weave it in at the top and edges. Does anyone here
know whether it works?
What is your favorite darn? After trying many methods, I've settled
on interlocking rows of buttonhole stitch for nearly all knits and
some wovens.
What do you use for darning wool? I still have a little Medici, and
right now I'm using spun silk (Gueterman sewing thread) to darn a pair
of wool slacks.
Reply to
Joy Beeson
I haven't worn my hand-knits enough to fix them, but I felted 2 pairs of socks by accident last winter. Both were washed in warm water and hung to dry, but I put them in the machine, and they didn't like that much agitation I guess. So now I have 2 pairs of beautiful socks 2 sizes too small. Guess I'll just donate them because there's not much else I can do. From the time I noticed this I started knitting socks ONLY with superwash. It works much much better. I still hang them, though they are supposedly okay in the dryer. I just can't do that.
My method of darning a sock is to stick the darning egg in, find some matching yarn and just kind of weave back and forth hooking onto the first spot that isn't raveled along each edge. Nothing too fancy....just homegrown repairs.
June
> It would appear that there are enough lurkers on this newsgroup to > hold a conversation after all -- all it needs is for each of us to > start a thread. > > So -- do your hand-knits get worn enough to require repair? If so, > what is your favorite method? > > I have picked up stitches and knit new toes onto socks, but I've never > done the bit where you ravel a hole rectangular, pick up stitches and > knit a patch, then weave it in at the top and edges. Does anyone here > know whether it works? > > What is your favorite darn? After trying many methods, I've settled > on interlocking rows of buttonhole stitch for nearly all knits and > some wovens. > > What do you use for darning wool? I still have a little Medici, and > right now I'm using spun silk (Gueterman sewing thread) to darn a pair > of wool slacks. > > -- > Joy Beeson > joy beeson at comcast dot net >
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The above message is a Usenet post.> I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
Reply to
Briggs
Yes, we've just been waiting... ;)
I get an occasional snag, hardly ever breaks the yarn though.
Reply to
suzeeq
In article ,
I have done that, and it did work, but the thing that mostly gets worn into disuse is my mittens, and it only works a couple of times. Still, it gets me an extra couple of years use out of them. I need to make me more mittens now.
I only darn handknitted stuff, so I use the same yarn I used in the first place. For children's trousers that go through at the knees, I just cut them down into shorts, lazy I know, and tights get turned into toy stuffing or fingerless gloves.
Kirsten
Reply to
Kirsten Watson

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