Laminating stretchy fleece at home?

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Is there some kind of product I can buy that will let me laminate two
layers of stretch fleece together with a home iron? I read about knit
intrafacing, but I don't know if it's sticky on both sides...


Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?
dianne wrote:
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Why would you want to do this? Fleece and heat do not go together well.

You probably could try SewFree adhesive, it's what all the big boys are
using ( Arctreryx, Marmot etc) but not much on fleece. The only place to buy
it retail in the world is www.shelbykaava.com

Penny S



Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?
small change wrote:
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I'm trying to make a molded contoured pad for cycling shorts. I can't
get the commercial pad I like in small quantities.

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I'd consider other top surface fabrics; something that stretches a
little and is very soft next to the skin. Coolmax?

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Thanks for the SewFree lead! I'm googling it now...


Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?
dianne wrote:> I'm trying to make a molded contoured pad for cycling shorts.
I can't
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good luck. Most commercial pads are injected molded, not something
duplicated at home. Fleece has a rather low melt temperature.

I make my own chamois out of layers of ultrasuede and polartec. There are
instructions on my website.


--
Tips for Making your own gear
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Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?
small change wrote:
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Hm, haven't seen and injection molded one yet! Got a link? That would
be something.

Most of the ones I've seen appear to be laminated: a top layer of some
kind of soft microfiber (often slightly stretchy, though sometimes
not), a middle layer of foam (various thicknessses, sometimes molded
with weld lines) and a bottom layer of what looks like interfacing to
me, but it's probably something else...

I realize I'll likely have to give up some RTW features in a home-made
pad (like the foam), but I think I'm *almost* there with the ones I've
tried so far.

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I tried bonding interfacing to the back of my microfleece without any
trouble; maybe I was lucky! I don't remember the setting on the iron,
but I followed the instructions on the interfacing. That pad turned out
half decent, except it needed to be *just* a bit thicker, and it was
dead flat -- no "saddle" shape at all. I'm thinking of making a
saddle-shaped ironing ham if I get that far...

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I had something similar and the two layers bunched up in uncomfortable
places. Maybe it wasn't just like yours. How many layers do you use and
what weight Polartec? I realize it might be presonal preference, but
would you think the Ultrasuede would be optional? What does it do as a
top layer that polartec can't?

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Great site Penny -- I've browsed it before. You're an inspiration to me!


Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?
dianne wrote:

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You can't fuse interfacing to fleece.  The heat needed to form th bond
will melt the fleece.  I never use it with fleece.

If you want double layered fleece, buy Windbloc or similar ready
laminated stuff.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?
Kate Dicey wrote:
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Hm, didn't know that. Thanks.

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I'm trying to give the laminate s adouble curved shape, which is why I
think laminating it myself might help.

I'm aiming for a pad for cycling shorts, not unlike this CANARI
"MicroSOFT" pad:
http://www.teamestrogen.com/reference/noteDetails.asp?ID=microsoft%20chamois

What I like about it is that there are no seams on the surface to
irritate my skin. There is a similar one (can't find a picture of it
online right now), and it has a nice "saddle" shape that helps prevent
bunching. Making that shape is why I'm thinking a stretch fabric would
be a good start, since I could maybe get it to take up a saddle shape
while laminating it.

Thanks for the quick reply!

Any other thoughts?

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Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?
If you managed to bond two layers of fleece together, wouldn't the bonding
agent eliminate the give in the fleece?  Just wondering!
Barbara in SC
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Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?
Bobbie Sews More wrote:
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Eliminating the give is one thing I'm worried about. I hope there's
something that will bond the stretch fleece (or Coolmax, or microfiber
or whatever), but won't eliminate the strech.

I'm hoping there's something like a stretch knit interfacing with the
sticky stuff on both sides...?


Re: Laminating stretchy fleece at home?

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( been skiing all day)

look at the steam a seam line of adhesives too they might have something for
stretch but I know it's not as tough as sewfree.


All I can say it hats's off to you if you want to experiment. I've often
thought that there ought to be a better aftermarket chamois available than
the only one out there. I assume you've seen it? Both Seattle Fabrics and
MEC carry it, it resembles an overlarge maxi pad.

Probaly injection molding isn't the right terminlogy. The factory pads I've
seen use any combination o the following: bonding, wicking fabrics, gel,
foam, molded foam, shaped foam, channels ... and based on what I know about
these things they are probably heat-set/molded in special forms. I'd kill
for an aftermarket, PI pad!

Both myself and my partner in outdoors sewing have experimented lots with
sewing chamois of ultrasuede and fleece. She's made some neat ones tracing
off a pattern from a chamois she liked, her pattern doens't have a center
seam and has better wings and she likes it a lot. Shaping and padding can be
built in with layering and stitching. I chose ultrasuede, because it's very
close to real chamois. Personally I think being right next to 200 weight
fleece would be abrasive, but you never know.

Penny S



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