Request - Soft Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

Here is a link to three variation of the cookie that result in different textures. Try the "chewey"
formatting link
,1976,FOOD_9956_17114,00.html
Reply to
Vox Humana
I was surprised to find out that some salt has other ingredients. I've even seen a salt in the US that has sugar in it. I'm assuming that kosher salt is just his way of ensuring it is pure sodium chloride (NaCl). Am I right? Or is there some other reason?
Reply to
Darrell Grainger
formatting link
,1976,FOOD_9956_17114,00.html>> I love Alton Brown's show Good Eats, although he has been getting a little> weird lately. I saw that his recipe calls for kosher salt. Why does he> always want kosher salt? Is it because it is pure salt?>
I agree that the show is becoming more bazaar. It seems to be the Food Network way: style above substance. I use regular salt when I bake because it has a smaller particle size than Kosher salt and distributes better and doesn't get left behind in a sieve like Kosher salt. Most recipes are formulated for regular table salt. If you want the same amount of Kosher salt by weight you would have to use 1.5 times more Morton's Kosher salt and 2 times more Diamond Kosher salt than specified in the recipe. This is because the different crystal sizes in each kind of salt pack together with different densities.
Kosher salt doesn't have iodine or anti-caking agents added. I really doubt that either of these things would be critical to a recipe in the amounts used. Of course you can always get non-iodized table salt.
Reply to
Vox Humana
"Vox Humana" writes:
One of the other attributes of "kosher" salt is that the crystals are irregularly shaped with lots of nooks and crannies. This provides a larger surface area for water and other liquids to be absorbed.
See the excellent electron microscope photo on the Boston Museum of Science web page at
formatting link
in mind that this salt is called "kosher" salt because it is used in the preparation of kosher meat. One of the religious requirements of meat being kosher is that the blood is removed. This is done by using salt to absorb the blood from the meat -- and kosher salt's granuals are optimized for this purpose.
These irregular shaped crystals are useful for recipes which use salt on the surface -- sprinkled on, stuck on, etc. If the salt is to be desolved into the recipe, the shape of the grains makes no difference except in its effect on measurement as noted by Vox Humana above.
Cheers, The Old Bear
Reply to
The Old Bear
I had been using the 3-way chocolate chip cookie recipe that Vox recommends for quite awhile. Then I tried the following recipe that I picked up over on alt.cookies.yumyumyum and everyone has asked that I keep using this one. Hope you like it.
Judy
From: LindaVE ( snipped-for-privacy@excel.spamout.net) Subject: Award Winning Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies View: Complete Thread (3 articles) Original Format Newsgroups: alt.cookies.yum.yum.yum Date: 2001-02-19 16:40:09 PST
* Exported from MasterCook II *
Award Winning Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies
Recipe By : Serving Size : 96 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Cookies Drop Chocolate Chips Nuts
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 2 cups butter or margarine 1 1/2 cups packed brown sugar 1/2 cup sugar 2 pkg(4 serv) instant pudding mix -- any flavor 4 eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 4 cups semisweet chocolate chips 2 cups walnuts -- chopped
Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). 2. Sift together the flour and baking soda, set aside. In a large bowl, cream together the butter, brown sugar and white sugar. Stir in the instant pudding until blended. Then stir in the eggs and vanilla. Add the dry ingredients and mix well. Finally, stir in the chocolate chips and nuts. 3. Drop cookies by rounded spoonfuls onto unprepared cookie sheets. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes in the preheated oven. Edges should be golden brown.
Reply to
Judy and Dave G
But really, even though not all salt is certified by an agency as kosher, there is nothing to make salt - no matter the size of the grain "un-kosher". I feel chefs refer to the larger grain of the salt when they call for kosher salt. I mean, why else would one call for kosher salt in a pork or shellfish recipe?
Jewish cook in Oregon, tgt
Reply to
tgt
"tgt" writes:
Yup. I guess that technically it should be called "koshering salt" or "salt for preparing kosher meat" or something.
The term "Kosher Salt" is like "House Paint" or "Baby Powder" where the modifying term describes how it is used rather than what it is.
And while House Paint is intended to be used to paint houses and Baby Powder is commonly used on babies, there is nothing to keep you from using House Paint to paint your lawn furniture or using baby powder on your adult self.
:)
Cheers, Will The Old Bear
Reply to
The Old Bear
at Fri, 31 Oct 2003 04:34:43 GMT in , :
Look on DejaNews for the recipe I posted a while back : 'Recipe: Big, Soft, all-butter chocolate chip cookies". I've tested and perfected it.
In general, to achieve a softer texture, the key is to use a higher proportion of eggs. A lot of people use shortening or margarine, which will certainly soften the texture, but as I've said, this is an unnecessary compromise. I think people end up resorting to shortening because they give up on trying to tinker with ratios, which takes time and many tests, especially when shortening yields the desired texture results in virtually foolproof manner.
Reply to
Alex Rast
Yes, most of the new shows seem to be like that. Although, I'm mighty happy that Michael Chiarella has a new show on the Food Network. He's been a local treasure here in No. Cal. for years. I adore him.
I use regular salt when I bake because
I use a particular French salt for everything. It is finer that regular table salt and has a better flavor.
Martha
Reply to
MH
I haven't seen that show. I had the unfortunate experience of seeing a new show this weekend on Food TV. The hostess was from some magazine and she was a complete spaz. It was too painful to watch for more than 10 minutes. There wasn't a single redeeming feature about the show. Looking at the schedule, the show was "Good food Fast with Family Circle." What a horror!
formatting link
Reply to
Vox Humana
On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 15:36:42 GMT
What, you mean Sarah Molton? I'm sure 'executive chef' must be a purely honorary title at 'Gourmet Magazine'.
Yeah, I remember how dumbfounded i was when she said, "now, if you have problems with lumps in your roux, you can just use a flat whisk like i do to get rid of the lumps"
I had to rewind with the tivo a couple times to make sure i hadn't mis-heard it, and then call my buddy Clint to ask if he'd ever, ever had a lump in his roux, 'cause i sure hadn't.
I don't go around calling myself a cook, let alone a chef. And *i could have told you that if you get lumps in your roux, you need to slow the heck down (or apply more heat) and wait until the water content in your fat (butter, in this case) boils off. Flat whisk. what a maroon.
How hard can it be? You wait until it stops bubbling. At that point, if you're sure the heat is still on and it hasn't stopped bubbling purely because it's gone cold, you can safely add your starch.
I tell you, it was worse than the first time i saw that 'perfect pancake' commercial, and had to watch it again in slow motion to figure out how they managed to fold the pancake.
"Does this ever happen to you?!" "Uh, what? No. That never happens to me. Wait a minute, how DID you do that?"
For the record, they first make the rookie mistake of flipping too soon, and then, if you watch closely, you can see how the actress rotates the spatula in her hand and then brings it down with considerable force, flexing the flat of it against the folded pancake. It actually looks like it must have taken some practice to get it right. The torn pancake was just flipped too soon and cooked on too hot of a surface.
Reply to
Eric Jorgensen
No. I'm afraid that this person was even worse!!! Hard to imagine, but she was. She couldn't even use measuring cups properly. The set was ugly. Her wardrobe was ugly. Her knowledge seemed limited. Take a look at the link.
Reply to
Vox Humana
The set is definitely ugly. She is almost ugly but more butch ugly not butt ugly. Maybe it's lousy make-up. At least she can almost chop onions. I am amazed what qualifies as a TV show these days.
Mr Pastry
Reply to
Mark Floerke
On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 19:05:44 GMT
Oh, now i get it. That 'magazine' that Kraft has been littering my mailbox with for the last few months has a TV show. Great. So far I've been judging 'family circle' by the cover and dropping it off in the trash on my way back from the mailbox. Never even makes it inside the house, but I'm incredibly averse to marketing.
If i hadn't seen the enormous Kraft logo on the back i would have presumed it was yet more mail for any of the dozens of people who've had this address before me. Four years I've been here and i keep seeing new names on the mail. It's not just junk mail, that i could understand. It's the fact that i get inch thick packages of papers from law firms and personal-looking letters and christmas cards and, stuff that you figure people would want sent to the right address. I get reams of mail for people who haven't lived here in at least six years. how hard is it to fill out a change of address form? wait a minute, I'm just ranting at this point. sorry.
Maybe they ought to be more honest about the content and simply list it as "Paid Programming" . . .
- Eric
Reply to
Eric Jorgensen

Site Timeline Threads

  • I made these kouign-amann based off of allrecipes recipe at might just be the...
  • last updated in

    Baking Crafts

  • I made these kouign-amann based off of allrecipes recipe at might just be the...
  • site's last updated in

    Baking Crafts

  • I made these kouign-amann based off of allrecipes recipe at might just be the...
  • site's newest in

    Baking Crafts

InspirePoint website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.