Silicone Bakeware????

I would appreciate your opinions on the new silicone bakeware---and the
benefit of your experience in using it.
I am new to this newsgroup. If I should be posting this kind of question to
another group, please re-direct me.
Thanks---
Donna
Reply to
Donna
On Sat, 1 Jan 2005 20:27:11 -0600
I haven't used it, but i hear that the benefits include making it really easy to spill your batter, and an odd greasy texture on your baked goods.
Reply to
Eric Jorgensen
I wish I hadn't bought it.. total crap. You can't carry anything in it.. unless you put it on another (metal) baking sheet, then carry it.. and the other poster was correct about the texture. True, it doesn't stick.. but neither does ultrex 2 bakeware (and cookware) Check it out on hsn.com That is the only nonstick cookware that is actually nonstick. I am able to cook eggs, etc without any oil or anything.. but, I didn't realize the first time I used it, that the eggs might stick to the spatula without any oil. lol! So.. I'm going back to my ultrex.. thank goodness I didn't toss it when I got the silicone junk. lucy
Reply to
Lucy
On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 06:20:02 GMT
But on the upside, you can wad it up and shove it in the back of a drawer after you've figured out you don't like it. :)
Reply to
Eric Jorgensen
NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces). On Sat, 1 Jan 2005 23:38:14 -0700, Eric Jorgensen wrote:
My Tupperware lady swears by it, but hell if I'm going to put that mushy rubbery thing into my oven!
Reply to
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
In article ,
I first saw them in the Seattle Restaurant Store and was immediately dubious, particularly of the bread pans. I imagined spilling my eggnog bread batter all over the kitchen floor and oven door en route to baking it. I'll stick to buttering my trusty old metal pans.
Cindy
Reply to
Cindy Fuller
On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 11:22:21 GMT
Ah yeah, bright colors will attract someone dumber than yourself to buy stuff off you that you wish you'd never bought.
Reply to
Eric Jorgensen
...
Oh drat! And here I thought I'd get some as it should be easier to stash somewhere in the RV.
Saw it on TV, but folks talking about handling it BEFORE it was baked sure convinced me that this might not be the best course of action.
Thank you all...
Dusty
Reply to
Dusty
There are at least two different types of this stuff on the market. Cheap and not.
In the NOT group is a gray silicone loaf pan that has ribbed reinforcements around the outside of the loaf pan to serve as stiffener and reinforcement that they claim will not collapse with batter inside.
In the cheap group are the red and blue and gray stuff with NO reinforcement molded in, that manages to bow out as you pour batter in, and expands sideways as the bread dough rises so that you end up with an oval bread.
To date I have not seen a report on what happens when the inevitable press of yeast expansion of dough occurs in one of those more expensive rib reinforced loaf pans, so I do NOT know if it is worth it or works.
Has anyone tried one of the latest generation of these blasted things to see if they are any better than the original type?
RsH ------------------------------------------------------------
R.S. (Bob) Heuman - Toronto, ON, Canada ======================================================= Independent Computer Security Consulting Web Site Auditing for Compliance with Standards or Copyright retained. My opinions - no one else's... If this is illegal where you are, do not read it!
Reply to
RsH

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