Re: turquoise and color change

"Tante Lina" wrote in message
I just made a choker incorporating some natural turquoise beads. I like the
> design, but I'm wondering if it was a bad idea. With every bead resting on
> the neck, won't it be exposed to more perspiration, lotions, etc. which
> could cause it to change color more quickly? Should I advise a buyer to
> rinse in clear water and dry it after wearing, or would this make things
> worse? I couldn't find much on the net about care of turq.
>
> * TL *
Hi,
I wear lots of turquoise and have not had a problem with color change. I
wouldn't advise a client to rinse the piece in water, maybe just wipe it
down with a damp cloth after wearing. They'll want to let it dry before
putting it away.
This is real turquoise you're talking about, yes?
Best,
Deborah
Reply to
Deborah
Turquoise is a very porous stone, and the color will change over time, but it's not as subject to damage from perfume, etc. the way pearls are. Just remember to tell them NEVER to put it in an ultrasonic cleaner, just wipe with a soft cloth. Patti
Reply to
Beadseeker
The turquoise I own is natural and a reasonably high quality. Which means, among other things that it's denser than cheaper stuff. And I am notoriously bad about not working at keeping my jewelry in good condition. On the other hand, it is very rare for me to use anything from an aerosol and never sprayed perfume, and I don't sweat much or live in a hot climate. I have never had a probblem with my badly cared for turquoise changing color.
Tina
PS Lina, you must have come into the group while I was gone. Tell me a little about yourself.
Reply to
Christina Peterson
vj found this in rec.crafts.beads, from "Christina Peterson" :
]The turquoise I own is natural and a reasonably high quality.
can you tell me where to get turquoise i can "believe in"?
----------- @vicki [SnuggleWench] (Books)
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(Jewelry)
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Bill of Rights - Void where prohibited by Law.Regime Change in 2004 - The life you save may be your own.
Reply to
vj
I can reliably get good turquoise from Rio. Other places that have their turquiose graded are usually pretty reliable too. But mostly I buy in person. I'm kinetic in my learning/thinking so it's my fingers that tell me, but their information is not very quantifiable. I won't buy turquoise any more unless I know details like if it's graded or dyed or compressed, etc.
Tina
Reply to
Christina Peterson
vj found this in rec.crafts.beads, from "Christina Peterson" :
]I can reliably get good turquoise from Rio. Other places that have their ]turquiose graded are usually pretty reliable too. But mostly I buy in ]person. I'm kinetic in my learning/thinking so it's my fingers that tell ]me, but their information is not very quantifiable. I won't buy turquoise ]any more unless I know details like if it's graded or dyed or compressed, ]etc.
that's what i'd like to do. but i don't know how to tell.
is that in the "bead info", too? nope - at least not yet.
----------- @vicki [SnuggleWench] (Books)
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(Jewelry)
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Bill of Rights - Void where prohibited by Law.Regime Change in 2004 - The life you save may be your own.
Reply to
vj
Christina Peterson wrote in message ...
Well, this reassures me somewhat, thanks.
Being somewhat of a mystery even to myself, I'm not sure where to start. What sort of things did you want to know? :^)
* TL *
Reply to
Tante Lina
Christina Peterson wrote in message ...
It's probably from here. My archives show 103 posts to this ng, starting 9/26/00, 57 with this user id.
* Grew up in Ohio, found out at 16 that I love the high desert, live in Arizona. Married with no children. Have been an artist all my life. Found my dream studio in a little mountain town in 1989, started working in a local gallery to pay my bills, she had me to bead while working, to pay her bills. She had me stringing three-strand bracelets on tiger tail, long dangly earrings on nymo, and treasure necklaces on waxed linen. Found I liked wire work; have added beads to silver components for different jewelry manufacturers in the area. Followed my husband to Austin where I spent five years completing some other creative projects and translating them to a web-based format. Did limited trials, was dismayed at how quickly people started to rip off my work, closed my site to the public. Recently moved back to AZ. An ex-boss encouraged me to develop my own line, have been doing that for the last few months. I like rosary-style jewelry. Have worked in a pottery shop where I handbuilt buttons and jewelry components to pass the time. Recently realized that the same stuff made out of PMC is actually worth something. Finally got a homepage set up to show what I've made in class:
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of you to show an interest! I always enjoy your contributions to thegroup.
* TL *
* PS: not a complete list. :^)
Reply to
Tante Lina
Natural turquoise is porous, it's basically blue chalk. Rinsing it would change color and cause it to deteriorate faster.
Personally, I think the color change in turquoise is part of its beauty -- it changes from the blue of the heavens to the green of the earth. The color change is evidence that it is natural and not full of glue or plastic or dye or wax or whatever the heck they inject it with to make it more colorful and more stable.
Just MHO, Mary T. 8-)
Aunt Molly's Bead Street
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and JustBeads: seriousbeader
Reply to
Mary Tafoya
Well, I'm glad you're here now. I'm enjoying you.
My daughter lives in Flagstaff. This cold-dweller is glad she's in a climate I can tolerate. Before I came to Alaska, I lived in Tahoe for 7 years. I love that rarified air.
I took a quick look at your work. Nice PMC work. I can see the deftness of your touch in it.
Tina
Reply to
Christina Peterson
Mary Tafoya wrote in message ...
Blue chalk - never thought of it that way. I bought untreated turq on purpose, but now that I've combined it with these other beads, I wish it were stabilized, 'cause I like these colors together the way they are right now. So - no rinsing, just keep them as dry and clean as possible, and learn to love green. Thanks Mary!
* TL *
Reply to
Tante Lina
Christina Peterson wrote in message ...
Thanks, Tina. You actually like cold weather? I toy with moving up to Flag, but only because, if global warming keeps up, it could be quite balmy there soon. :^)
* TL *
Reply to
Tante Lina
On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 23:45:47 GMT, "Tante Lina" wrote: Recently realized that the same stuff made out of PMC is
Barbara Dream Master
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"We've got two lives, one we're given, the other one we make." Mary Chapin Carpenter
Reply to
Barbara Otterson
Barbara Otterson wrote in message ...
The particular PMC pcs you're talking about, only took me about 5 minutes to make. I used one store-bought rubber stamp that maybe cost $5. There wouldn't be one metal stamp to make all those shapes, so you'd have to buy several, they're about that much each, and they're made with very precise shapes, not calligraphic strokes as on the rubber stamp. To actually reproduce the loosely drawn look, Barbara, come on, you'd have to do chasing. Even if the exact look of stamps were available, I've done some stamping on silver and it's not at all easy to get even results. I wouldn't be anywhere near as fast as you are.
* TL *
Reply to
Tante Lina
On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 21:56:09 GMT, "Tante Lina" wrote:
;-) Practice, practice, practice! Stamps aren't expensive, and have you seen the IJS catalog? There are 3 or 4 pages of nothing but stamps. And all they show is the impression each makes! With the cost of PMC, you could buy lots of stamps. (Sorry, couldn't resist tweaking your chain...)
Barbara Dream Master
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"We've got two lives, one we're given, the other one we make." Mary Chapin Carpenter
Reply to
Barbara Otterson
Barbara Otterson wrote in message ...
Barbara,
My ex-employer makes mated dies for doming the shapes used in traditional Navajo silversmithing, like butterflies. Man, are they expensive! But they come in handy when you can shape a piece with a few hammer strikes.
I've had plenty of exposure to smithing. I hate working around fire, and have no interest in that practice practice stuff, either. :^) My background in clay makes PMC natural for me. Especially since I've always liked to work with press molds.
I don't compare the price of PMC to the price of silver sheet. I compare it to the price of buying findings that, on top of having a pedestrian design, are being used by everyone else.
PMC will never replace what you do - which is spectacular BTW - but it's really not an either-or situation!!
Happy Trails, * TL *
Reply to
Tante Lina
Barbara, There is one thing I usually fabricate, and that is jump rings. I'm having a hell of a time finding a set of mandrels - Rio has a set with something like two round sizes and one oval size - not very versatile. Does IJS have them in more sizes? Or do you know of another supplier? I do have a resale number.
Thx, * TL *
Reply to
Tante Lina
On Fri, 01 Aug 2003 00:50:21 GMT, "Tante Lina" wrote:
The guy who makes the KoilKutter carries a lot of mandrels in different sizes and shapes. You can email Dave at snipped-for-privacy@gci-net.com (I don't know why he doesn't make a website!).
Reply to
Marilee J. Layman

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