Grinder Problems

When I first got my new grinder I was thrilled with it, but I've been
having problems recently and I'm thinking about sending it back to the
manufacturer. Yesterday I spent almost 20 minutes grinding on a piece
and it was still too small.
Michael
Reply to
Michael
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hun h?????
****************** I used to be a carpenter, and the saying then was "I cut it off twice and it's still too short."
Michael
Reply to
Michael
LOL.... that's why I'm using the same head for the last 5 years. I grind to take the sharpness off. I believe in taking the time to be a more accurate cutter, and spending as little time as possible at the grinder.... but what do I know?
Reply to
glassman
LOL.... that's why I'm using the same head for the last 5 years. I grind to take the sharpness off. I believe in taking the time to be a more accurate cutter, and spending as little time as possible at the grinder.... but what do I know?
********************** I have seen your work and it's obvious you know plenty, JK. One thing I've noticed though with commercial lamp kits is that the pattern you cut to doesn't exactly match the pattern that is on the mold. Cutting just a little larger and grinding a bit is a trade-off on having to recut pieces where the cutting pattern is much smaller than the mold pattern.
Michael
Reply to
Michael
Lamp patterns are notorious for being inaccurate. Lots of grinding there for a good fit but that said....... I know this will kill your sensibilities, but in the real world not one person will notice, when the difference between a good fit and an OK fit is measured in 32nd's of an inch.
Reply to
glassman
I know this will kill your sensibilities, but in the real world not one person will notice, when the difference between a good fit and an OK fit is measured in 32nd's of an inch.
************ Even though a lit lamp is really going to show up fat lines, it's not actually my sloppy cuts or even my crummy soldering that bothers me the most. It's my choice of glass. My lamp looks like something out of a child's coloring book, with none of the subtle mixing of many colors and shadings that comes from a skilled choice of glass. I've got the Neustadt book coming in the mail, and maybe watching the Porcelli video again would help. But for a while I'm going to remain clueless. I mean, I choose red for red flowers and green for leaves. What do I use some blotched red and green confusion for? Both flowers and leaves? Who can make heads or tails of a mess like that? Conceptually, and color-wise, I've got some growing up to do.
Thanks for posting, JK. I always appreciate your comments.
Michael
Reply to
Michael
Some are color challenged and never make great choices. I used to have a woman at my side doing all the designs & picking. Then she left and I was on my own. It made a big difference. By the way I'm color blind.
Reply to
glassman
Some are color challenged and never make great choices. I used to have a woman at my side doing all the designs & picking. Then she left and I was on my own. It made a big difference. By the way I'm color blind.
***************** I'm trying to engage the women, too. I pick out a few colors and ask my wife and daughter to help choose, emphasizing looking at them together and lit. I pretty much trust them but then again coloring in stained glass is something of an acquired taste.
Michael
Reply to
Michael
Color choice is not an issue if you are a turbo-soldering, crash annealing, sushi-plate forming Canuck with little talent and even less craftsmanship. LOL
Reply to
Moonraker
Colors are a challence. I started my art career late, over 50's. At that age one is well aware that life is too short to learn everything. I decided then not to pain but do sculpting and drawing and leave the colors to others. I'll concentrate to light and shadow. My drawing developed to pastel painting. There I had a box of colors to choose, and skip the mixing of hues.
The same with kilnforming glass. I need a rack of colors to choose from. Some mixing takes place when fusing transparents, but then I have a good guesstimate by stacking the sheets. The real challenge is to work with multicolored glass, and cutting the right pieces.
-lauri
Reply to
Lauri Levanto

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