Spring loaded cutter


I'm looking for a spring loaded cutter to put on a cnc gantry machine. I
could use a pneumatic actuator to apply the correct pressure but I'm looking
for simple. Is 15 psig the correct pressure for most stained glass? Also,
can I use my engraving head to cause the fissures by just cutting too deep?
Reply to
kdoney

You're describing what we called in the 70's, an odd shaped glass cutting machine. My brother designed and used one for years making duplicate lamp pieces. A stylus followed an engraved pattern in plexi, and the cuttter, using a pantograph system, scored the glass. I don't remember the PSI we used, but it worked on a very small compressor. I believe they are still being old. Google it.
Reply to
jk
Well for me it is a way to avoid using pneumatics in order to apply a, mainly constant, pressure (15lbs) in the Z axis. Pneumatics are noisy. I would have thought a spring loaded cutter would be available for beginners to apply the right amount of pressure to the mainstream of glass without the experience to "know" how much pressure to apply.
Reply to
kdoney

I think you missed the point of my "WHY".....
What are you trying to accomplish that takes a CNC machine to cut the glass with?
If you are trying to cut lots of repetitive pieces, the fact that you have scored them with a machine still hasn't gotten the parts broken out of the big sheet, which has to be done by hand anyway. Secondly, given the "grain" of the glass and the color patterns and artistic considerations of where to put the pattern onto the glass sheet, the idea of mechanically cutting the glass is counterproductive from where I sit, both from an artistic and expense point. If you are trying to cut intricate parts, you probably won't be able to break them out of the glass anyway, unless you make relief scores on the inside curves. And if you have tight outside curves, the glass is likely to run off your score...right across another part the machine has scored. If you are planning on putting small pieces of glass in the CNC machine and mechanically holding them in place for the machne to score the glass.....I promise you any competent SG worker can keep pace with the machine with a lot less waste.
If you are interested in cutting out many multiples of the same part, as in mass producing lamp shades, you need to be looking at water-jet cutting,
If you are interested in making lots of "square" pieces out of one big sheet of plate glass....look in the CRLaurence catalog for the automated cutters. They have machines that will take a stock sheet and make lots of smaller pieces, minimizing waste.
Reply to
Moonraker
They make machines that have a weight above the cutter to apply the pressure. I doubt it's as high as 15 lbs.
Jack
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Reply to
nJb
I thank you for all of the good information. It sounds challenging. I will grant you that no machine process can duplicate the artistic element required for professional grade stained glass. I am a machinist, not an artist. I just want to be able to set my zero and let the machine give me the same part, over and over again.
I do want to cut multiples of the same part and I want to nest cuts from the same sheet. I would go with a waterjet but these machines are extremely expensive. Are you saying that there is no algorithm which can be developed to decide how to cut a sheet of glass depending upon how the part is shaped? That would be depressing.
Reply to
kdoney

I have no idea if such an algorithm exists. But I wouldn't hold my breath......
If you were planning on making "identical" parts from the same sheet, you could put them side by side, then have the machine make a dividing score between the rows, and then score another set, side-by-side. I suppose you could also have the machine do a dividing score between the parts, so that you could break apart the little rectangles and then weed out the scrap that surrounds the part.
How big is the table for this machine? You'll likely have to cushion the table with some carpet between the glass and the table.
Reply to
Moonraker
The table has a 2' X 3' travel and I imagined having a 1/2" felt table with a vacuum underneath. How about just routing the whole thing?
considerations
mechanically
Reply to
kdoney

K.D.:
There are CNC fabric and leather cutting machines used by apparel manufacturers that would have an algorithm of use to you.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Reply to
Edward Hennessey

Yes. I hear they also have a wonderful instructional tape. If you ask them nicely, they send it to you in a few days. Very punctual and men of their words too!
Reply to
jk

OK, I guess I got that coming,
Will include invoice in shipment..... Did I ever mention how much that was going to be??
Reply to
Javahut
A few years ago I was on the verge of buying an $8,000. Billco but discovered the Cutters Mate. I can make glass or wood cutting guides and use that $200. device to do the same work the Billco could.
As to cutting pressure, we teach beginners (and even old timers in our Cutting Clinics) that the optimum pressure when scoring glass is 5 lbs. A bathroom scale is great for practicing. Just put a piece of glass on the scale and score it. Watch the weight reading and practice keeping it to a consistent steady 5 lbs.
Reply to
Dennis Brady

You're not helping me by ganging up on him Moon... just for that, yours will be twice the price of mine.
Reply to
jk

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