Transfering pattern to denim

Does anyone have any ideas about how to transfer an embroidery pattern
onto denim? Have you ever tried it? I'm wanting to make little door
hanging pillows for some kids and I have some old jeans that have holes
in the knees. My bright idea was to use the good part of the denim for
the pillows, but I can't figure out how to get my pattern onto the
fabric where it's visible.
Reply to
tryingname2
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There are pencils that create a hot-iron transfer. The problem is, they do not always wash out. But if you can keep a sharp point, and embroider over it, you shouldn't have any trouble. I haven't used them on denim, but there is a pink one that should work well for you.
The other option is to use dressmakers carbon. Lay that on the denim, then lay your pattern on top, and with a ballpoint pen draw the design. That will transfer the waxy carbon (comes in several colors) to your denim.
And still another option is to lay your pattern on the denim and with needle and thread, make small running stitches around the outline of your pattern. This only works well for non-detailed designs.
Hope this helps. Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
You'll have to hunt for it, but there is such a thing as colored carbon paper for fabrics. If the denim is faded, the white probably won't show up well, but I think there's also red, which would.
I'm sure Tia Mary would have a source for dressmaker's carbon, since she's our resident professional.
Reply to
Karen C - California
Dianne Lewandowski ,in and entertained us with
One more way would be to take a piece of tulle, trace the design on to that, then place the tulle on the denim and with a light coloured pencil, retrace over the tulle. It was a method I used in an Australian book for tracing a design for a stumpwork pattern illustrated in the book. Seemed weird, but worked well.
Reply to
lucretia borgia
Everyone has given you some great ideas if you want to transfer a surface embroidery design to denim. If you need dressmaker's carbon, it too is available wherever fabric and sewing supplies are sold and is available in a package of several colors. If you want to do cross stitch, use waste canvas. Both items are available at Michael's, Joanns, Wally World, Hobby Lobby or just about any craft store that sells needlework, fabric &/or sewing supplies. **IF** you are going to do cross stitch and use waste canvas, go to Dianne's site (
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) . She has generously posted a short "Hot To" guide that I wrote up for using waste canvas -- it's in the Educational section, IIRC. Good Luck & CiaoMeow >^;;^<
Reply to
Tia Mary
I'd always wondered about this method. Now I know someone who has tried it. Yes, it does sound weird and I've never been able to picture it in my head. As stubborn as I am, you'd have thought I'd have tried it by now!
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
It really makes works. The tulle is a fine enough mesh that you can simultaneously see the ink lines that you've traced off the pattern, see where you've traced with the pencil, and it let enough pencil/chalk through to mark the fabric. It leaves a line rather like pin marking, although the dots are close enough together that it looks like a nearly solid line.
jenn
-- Jenn Ridley : snipped-for-privacy@chartermi.net WIP: Oriental Butterfly, Floral Sampler, Rose Trio, Carousel (TW) Most recently Finished: Insect Sampler, TicTacToe Sampler, Snow Stitching log:
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Reply to
Jenn Ridley
Dianne Lewandowski ,in and entertained us with
Trust me, it works very well. Easy to trace and easy to mark on to the fabric. I don't think I would use it if the pattern was to be transferred to a flimsy fabric though.
Reply to
lucretia borgia
Someone here once said they used waste canvas to do surface embroidery -- NOT xstitch -- on a woven fabric . I can't imagine WHY anyone would use waste canvas for surface embroidery. I suppose if you drew the design on the waste canvas, basted it to the woven fabric and then, if you were very, VERY careful, you could stitch over the wc and remove it once the stitching was finished. I'd much rather use one of the methods previously mentioned if I was going to be doing surface embroidery! The thought of trying to work anything but xs over top of waste canvas is *not* a happy thought -- LOL! I've used the tulle method that Sheena had described for transferring designs to all sorts of stuff -- not just fabric. It really works nicely and is one of the less expensive methods for doing this. CiaoMeow >^;;^<
Reply to
Tia Mary
That may have been me. In one of the first few editions of "Inspirations", there was a knitted baby sweater. The instructions for doing the surface embroidery over this lovely confection was with the use of waste canvas, supposedly to tame the give of the knitted ground.
I was always going to try it and never did. The design for this sweater was very simple - no satin stitching.
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
schreef in bericht news: snipped-for-privacy@u72g2000cwu.googlegroups.com...
I once did the shoulderpart of denim jacket. Back then, I transferred the outlines at the backside of the denim, and made running stitches so the outlines show up at the front side. To be honest, the result was great but it really was no fun stitching this. If I had to do it again, I would try water soluble film now. I imagine you can draw the outlines on the transparent film with a marker and it all disappears when you rinse your work. Did anyone of you use this method? Grea
Reply to
vlerk
I hate to show my ignorance, but what is water soluble film? Is it availble at regular fabric stores or craft stores? How does it stay in place on the fabric while stitching?
Reply to
tryingname2
I still can't imagine using waste canvas. A regular, light weight woven fabric just seems to be more practical. Besides, the rough edges of the waste canvas would snag on the sweater I should think!! CiaoMeow
Reply to
Tia Mary
It's pretty much exactly what it says! It's a film which comes in different weights, it's fairly transparent and has a bit of "give" to it. It's used a lot in machine embroidery and other decorative types of machine sewing. The stuff I have is Solvy brand and it's available pretty much anywhere sewing machine thread is sold -- even the grocery store!! You can transfer a design onto the film, pin the film to your fabric and then sew or stitch right through it. Once you have the design completed, you simply wet the film ( a spray bottle is usually adequate) and it dissolves. There is also a heat responsive film -- one quick touch with a warm or hot iron and the stuff disappears! This is best suited to fabrics that can't be wet -- velvet and moiré are the two that come to mind. CiaoMeow >^;;^<
Reply to
Tia Mary
Yes. Look for water soluble stabiliser, over by the machine embroidery supplies. More likely to find it at a fabric or quilting store than a craft store. The stuff I've seen isn't totally transparent, but it's mostly see through.
Some of it can be tacked down with a cool-ish iron, or you can baste or pin it down.
jenn
-- Jenn Ridley : snipped-for-privacy@chartermi.net WIP: Oriental Butterfly, Floral Sampler, Rose Trio, Carousel (TW) Most recently Finished: Insect Sampler, TicTacToe Sampler, Snow Stitching log:
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Reply to
Jenn Ridley
I am taking an individual correspondence class on teaching children to embroider. Since I don't want to have to deal with finishing, framing, etc, I am planning on having my first guinea pigs stitch their own drawing on a dish towel (flour sack type) for their mom. I've already talked to mom about having the kids each draw a SIMPLE picture that we can stitch sometime during the summer. What might be the easiest way to get their drawing onto the dish towel - dressmakers' carbon??? I've read about the tulle idea but am fabric challenged & am also hoping to spend as little money as necessary.
I think this one class requrement of having the kids stitch their own drawing is the hardest part. :-) The stitching/teaching part is easy! The "interpreting their own design" part is a pain in the rear! :-)) It's a little more artsy than what I was expecting. Liz from Humbug
Reply to
Liz from Humbug
Liz from Humbug said
Consider using an iron-on transfer pencil. The first step is to make a mirror image of the kids' pictures either with a copier or computer scanner. Next, either you or the kids would go over the lines on the copy with the pencil. Then iron the results on to the towel for the kids to stitch.
Make sure the pencil is very sharp as the lines tend to bleed a bit during the ironing process.
Reply to
anne
Liz, tulle is VERY inexpensive -- often only about $2.00/yard AND 52" wide. It would be far cheaper to purchase a yard of tulle -- assuming you don't have 100 kids to use it for and their designs will be smallish. IIRC, even Wally World carries it but the best selection (as far as type of tulle) would be available from Joann's or Hancock's. Tulle comes in several different netting sizes. There is the stuff with really big holes that is used for things like petticoats and is very stiff -- this is likely what would work best for design transfer purposes, especially with kids. Next is the mid-hole size tulle that is often used for decorative stuff -- not as stiff but prettier to look at if it's going to be seen. Finally there is veiling which has teensy little holes and is very soft -- Illusion Veiling being the stuff used for Bridal Veils,etc. and is extremely soft and drapable. I know -- much more knowledge than anyone ever wanted to know about tulle -- LOLOL! CiaoMeow >^;;^<
Reply to
Tia Mary

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