Janome machine needle

The needle on my Janome Memory Craft 4000 broke today. I can't find my
extra needles, and I can't find the manual to tell me what to buy to
replace it. I'm going to take it to the quilt shop and they'll
probably solve the puzzle but just in case, does anyone know what I
should ask for? This is one of those things that happens so rarely I
can't remember a thing about it!
Thanks for any help.
-
Debbie
Reply to
Debbie Miller
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I don't own a Janome, but you probably need whatever sort of Schmetz needle suits your project. (Singers like their own needles better.) It's a good idea to have a wide selection on hand. My collection includes regular "universal" needles in several sizes for piecing or garment sewing, green band "quilting needles", purple band Microtex, blue band jeans, top stitching needles, and as a special treat, some titanium-coated embroidery needles. All in as many sizes as possible, because you never know when a special thread might be fussy. (I also have a couple of twin needles for fun.) Roberta in D
Reply to
Roberta
I've owned Janomes for 20+ years- Schmetz needles are the way to go. Universal needles have their uses but for quilting- all phases- topstitching needles are great. I'd say size 14 would be safe for you if you only buy one size. But... you should be changing your needle regularly- not when they break. And a selection of sizes for the type of fabric, type of thread and the job you are doing is the best solution.
You are going to be amazed at the difference a new needle will make. ;-)
Leslie & The Furbabies in MO.
Reply to
Leslie & The Furbabies in MO.
On Fri, 19 Nov 2010 21:04:23 -0800 (PST), Debbie Miller wrote:
No need to haul it in. The needle system used by all home sewing machines in the last 45 years is variously termed 130/705H, 15x1H, HAx1, SY2020 and 130R. You can mostly ignore all that and buy a packet of "sewing machine needles" (as opposed to "serger/overlock" needles). For piecing tops, I'd go with size 70/10 or 80/12 needles, sharp points (jeans or microtex are both sharps).
Needles are really only good for about 8 hours of actual sewing time -- here's why:
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More needle information:
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Kay
Reply to
Kay Lancaster
Excellent illustration of a damaged needle. We discuss sm needles quite often, but I wonder how often we forget our hand sewing needles can suffer the same kind of damage. I know I haven't thrown away a hand needle unless it's hopelessly bent. Do you retire used hand sewing needles after a period of time? ;-)
Leslie & The Furbabies in MO.
Reply to
Leslie & The Furbabies in MO.
Thank you to everyone for the help. I haven't quilted in a few years, I moved into cross-stitch and when I pulled out the machine to stitch backing onto a small cross-stitch piece, I made a bad decision on the bobbin I put in and snap! Off came the point. In my regular quilting days, I'd know about the needle AND the poor choice of bobbin but the whole concept was just lost to me! I'll confidently go out shopping today.
Thanks again for the help! -- Debbie
Reply to
Debbie Miller
Not only needles but if you use safety pins for basting they go dull too. Gotta change those needles often because of wear and for proper type. I just bit the bullet and ordered a whole bunch of them in a variety of sizes and types a couple years ago. Easier to keep them around and ready to go. Also sometimes there is some testing involved with fabrics and battings. Taria in cold blustery so cal.
Reply to
Taria
On Fri, 19 Nov 2010 23:04:23 -0600, Debbie Miller wrote (in article ):
I use regular Schmetz needles in my Jem.
Maureen
Reply to
Maureen Wozniak

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