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canvas curtains?

Would I regret making bedroom curtains out of canvas? I'm looking for thick curtains to block the lights out of a baby's bedroom, and -- while looking on-line for barkcloth -- found some canvas I like the looks of.
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SML
Reply to
Sara Lorimer
Dear Sarah,
I suppose you could use canvas, if you use a lightweight type like duck. But why not put up a rolling shade? It will block the light, can be decorated to go with the baby's bedroom, and then you could use any fabric you want for the curtains.
There is a big difference between home dec fabric and dress fabric. Canvas in any color other than natural, will fade within six months. That's why home dec fabrics are sold in a separate department. The dyes used for their manufacture are more permanent and also more expensive. Synthetic fibers are colored in a different way, so their colors are retained better than natural fibers.
Teri
Reply to
gjones2938
wrote:
There's already a venetian blind in the window, so there's no room for a rolling shade, but it's not enough on the mornings. I want to have a blind _and_ curtains, in the hopes that she'll sleep past dawn. I'm one step away from lining her window with tinfoil.
I didn't know that. Thanks.
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SML
Reply to
Sara Lorimer
Why not make curtains using blackout curtain lining? It looks cream, but blocks all the light. I've used it several times and it works well.
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Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Reply to
Kate XXXXXX

;-) I remember that feeling. How about lining curtains with blackout lining?
There are several sites that come up on a google search, for both ready made curtains and fabric:
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fabric by the yard:
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I would think that would be far more satisfactory in a baby's room than "canvas". And it would *really* block the light, you might put all that work into the canvas and find light still seeps in. To get the best result, the curtains should be a few inches larger in every dimension than the window.
Beverly, just finished mowing the lawns, back to sewing....
Reply to
BEI Design
I have to jump in here about the blackout lining. I've used it for both of my children when they were young (DD still has curtains with it) and it helps a LOT!!! DS's room is away from the sun, so he gets up with ihs alarm or with me, but DD sleeps and sleeps....I can usually have until 730 or so before she even starts waking up....definitely something I would say look into.
Larisa
Reply to
offkilterquilter
Kate XXXXXX wrote in news:462d3915$0 $8744$ snipped-for-privacy@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net:
This is what I would do. Find a fabric you like for the bedroom to show on the room side and line with the room darkening fabric. That way you get decoration and light blocking without interfering with your blinds all in one fell swoop. I knew Kate would answer eventually :)
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~Donna
http://www.frugalsewing.com
Reply to
Donna
Dear Sara,
Is this your first child? I've raised two children and five grandchildren. So long as they are fed, dry and comfy, they'll sleep regardless of the light. Now myself, I am distracted even by the digital clock and the light on the telephone--I want complete darkness.
Teri
Reply to
gjones2938

Let me add to the votes for blackout curtain lining.
It blocks out the light, protects the decorator curtain fabric from sun damage... and provides a consistent look on the outside of the house. It can be surprising on how odd it looks from the outside when there are different, or clashing window treatments.
Reply to
sis
Maybe. My fourth child was so light of a sleeper that the sound of a paper blowing across the hardwood floor would wake up him. When he was a toddler and woke up in the middle of the night, he would let himself out of his crib, go to the kitchen, pull snacks out and have a middle-of-the-night snack (leaving the snacks out but thankfully closing the refridgerator door), and go back to bed.
He sleeps perfectly fine these days at age 15, though.
Reply to
Melinda Meahan - take out TRAS
Thanks to all of you for the blackout fabric advice and links. That's what I'll do.
On that topic... should I was the blackout fabric before sewing it? I just got some yesterday, but forgot to ask in the fabric store.
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SML
Reply to
Sara Lorimer
That really may depend on the particular product. I would call the store and ask before risking the fabric in a washer. And be sure you ask about machine drying while you're at it.
Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design
Addendum: just found at a site which sells RTW Block-Out liners: "Dry clean only"
And denverfabric.com has several brands:
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but doesn't specify cleaning method(s).
I would still ask at the store where you bought *your* fabric.
Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design

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