Frilling tales of frockery


The weekend involved stays, rufflers, frills, glue, scissors, paper,
rulers, fabric, sewing machines that failed and those that worked, and
lots of wine. The wine happened after most of the sewing...
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Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
Just looking at your pictures made me tired! Goodness at the work you two, plus the guys, got accomplished! Just think of the work you all could have done if the machines had cooperated! Love the teal! Barbara in SC
Reply to
Bobbie Sews More
Oooohhh, that makes me want to play with my ruffler. I don't think I have ever even installed it on the machine, but it looks like it would be delightful fun and games.
As for your Naughty Machines: Behave!
HTH,
Reply to
BEI Design
Slap that ruffler on your 401, and get yards and yards of scrap, then play. You'll be amazed at what you can do with it, and get perfect results. It's a marvelous piece of engineering.
Reply to
Pogonip
Yeah, yeah, I'll get to that right after you run off some designs on your XL6000 (It's a marvelous piece of technology). ;-D
I don't currently have any work requiring yards and yards of ruffles, it was probably wonderful for making those cute ruffled curtains of yesteryear.
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Reply to
BEI Design
Giggle... It takes me a day or so to recover from these frantic weekends, but they are SOOOOO much fun! Sewing buddies is good!
The sewing machines weren't a problem. We had two working sergers and several working sewing machines threaded up in different colours. I do have more than 20 in the house to choose from... ;)
That teal is wicked, isn't it. :D
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
The ruffler is fab on light weight fabrics. Bit of a skiddle to get exactly right, but huge fun!
The machines were unfortunate but not a disaster. The little white Singer has always had tension issues, and I can get the tension bit off and replace it without too much hassle. Same for the motor if we can find one. The serger would have gone in the skip if it hadn't been rescued. No feet or instruction manual... I think it may have been dropped. It came out of a drop-in social center, after all!
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
*Pfffffffffttt!!* I've used mine to sew ruffles on the bottom of nightgowns. I like long, sweeping gowns made of light-weight cotton, and a ruffle at the bottom just adds to the sweep. ;-)
I just signed up for a webinar in September to go through the workbook for the XL6000. So there!
Reply to
Pogonip
Indeed. I imagine there is still a demand, otherwise the web site would not exist.
Hmm, finally something we *don't* agree on. I wear pajamas, ruffles around the bottoms just would not do. ;->
Clap, clap, clap, clap... ;-)
Reply to
BEI Design
My questions, also! Those look like a nightmare to launder, never mind press.
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That is just wrong is so many ways....
Reply to
BEI Design
I think it may have been
Yikes!!! I liked the design of the old machines, that you could attach a little motor with a belt running to the handwheel, or put on a hand-crank, or drop the head in a treadle. So much simpler, and with such interchangeable parts, so much less expensive. Hmmm....I've got a few of those around here....
Reply to
Pogonip
I think it may have been
Actually, though the motor sits inside the smooth exterior housing (which is a right pain to get off, I have to say!), it fits to the machine chassis in much the same way. It's held on with two large screws and sits on a rubber bung that acts as a damper for vibration and noise.
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX

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