Pinker attachment

Yesterday, I had my annual physical and as usual, I was talking about sewing to one of the nurses. She told me her DGM passed away recently and she inherited 2 attachments for her old Singer machine.
One is a buttonhole attachment, with which I am familiar; the other is a 'pinker' with which I'm not familiar. She said, as a child in the 1940s and visiting her DGM, she was totally fascinated with this attachment.
DGM was a professional, and would sew several items during the day, and in the evening, when ready to stop, she'd attach the pinker and run all the seams through at one sitting. The child was allowed to play with the cuttings, which she loved to do. Now she can pink seams and allow her little 3-YO DGD plays with the cuttings.
My question is, "Will one work on my 1961 slant-needle Singer?" If so, where might I find one for sale, besides E-Bay and Amazon? Emily
Reply to
Emily Bengston
Singer made two kinds, the pinker attachment and a stand-alone pinker that clamps to a table. The attachment fits the old straight-needle Singers, as far as I know. Mine does. So, you need to pick up a 15 or 66 (or 99) to round out your sewing room, and then you can use the attachment. But you can also have the stand-alone pinker. There are good pictures on this page:
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Try not to look at what she's asking for it. It's a bit more than the other one I see for $50 on another site - but with not-as-good pictures. ;-)
Reply to
Pogonip
wrote:
The Pinker was a way to finish fabric edges. They came with different blades; one was a pinking blade, there was also a scallop. There may have been more.
They came in two flavors; one that attached to a machine, and one that was stand alone (I have one of these) with a clamp to attach it to a table, and a crank to turn it.
The attachment type were made before the age of the Singer slant needle. They were designed to fit on the low shank Singers.
-Irene
Reply to
IMS

One of my niece's has my older, but definitely excellent, straight needle Singer. If I remember the correct model number, it's a 6011that was purchased in the early 80s. DN is such a sweet person, who needed a decent machine and is very appreciative. She loves to sew as much as me. Emily
Reply to
Emily Bengston

On 2/17/09 8:16 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,
Thank you, Irene, for the information. I know it probably won't fit my Pfaff low shank machine either, because it has the IDF. I do have an 1898 Singer hand-crank, that I've been thinking of putting a motor on it, since DS & DDIL refuses to allow their 10-YO to have a sewing machine. It was the first model Singer that could be put in a cabinet. Emily
Reply to
Emily Bengston
Emily, if you need pinking for fabric which is too difficult for shears, you might consider:
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gave me a rotary cutter with the pinking blade when arthritis in my hands started giving me problems. I don't use it often, but sometimes it is the only way to get a pinked edge. And you all know how I feel about pinking... ;-)
Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design

On 2/18/09 1:46 AM, in article gngedb$kgl$ snipped-for-privacy@reader.motzarella.org, "BEI
Thanks, Beverly. I am going shopping at TSWLTH Friday and will look for one of those. I have 2 rotary cutters of the same brand which I bought there a while back; maybe they'll have one of these.
DS gave me a pair of 9-10 inch Wiss pinking shears, like DM used; they are great when I can hold them; and I have a pair of 7-inch Wiss that belonged to my DSIL which are okay. Usually, though I use the 9-inch Fiskars, they are easier to handle when my wrist bothers me.
This pinker attachment fascinated me. Sewing gadgets, especially when they're new to me, make me act like a child seeing another's new toy, "I want one like that." LOL(vbg) Emily
Reply to
Emily Bengston
I love mine for pinking stuff like the edges of fusible interfacing and very tightly woven silks...
A friend sent me one from the USA... Alan moaned about yet another sewing gadget cluttering up the house. I just left it out on the treadle table, and a couple of hours later he was fiddling with it, expressing approval for the excellence of the engineering... :D
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX

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