Replaced Upper Looper - no stitches will hold - Help

I broke the upper looper on my Singer Ultrlock 14SH 654 - I put in the
new one (expensive part - fyi) and now no stitches will stay in the
fabric. Maybe I have the looper in the wrong position? Does the upper
looper glide in front or in back of the needles?
Any assistance is appreciated.
Reply to
dzrtblonde
In front. And you'll need to set the timing. Adjustments in sergers are in parts of millimetres. They are usually set using an electronic timer. This may need adjustment by a sewing machine engineer with the right equipment.
Reply to
Kate Dicey
Yes the looper must be positioned exactly. The needles fall behind the upper looper, the left needle must enter inside the thread loop. The looper must also clear the bottom looper just slightly and again inside the thread loop.
Reply to
Ron Anderson
Actually it is looper positioning. Timing is entirely something else and often confused. I do not know who is telling you those stories about electronic timers but I would run away from them
Reply to
Ron Anderson
I think I meant factory set. I know my engineer *has* one but usually doesn't use it, or only starts with it and then moves on to experience...
I was also thinking that enough force to break a looper would mean that one would at least need to CHECK the timing!
Reply to
Kate Dicey
Dear dzrtblonde,
If your serger was working fine until the thread broke, did you unthread the needles before rethreading the looper? If not, that's what's wrong. You must always unthread the needles before rethreading either looper.
Teri
Reply to
gjones2938
Timing adjustments on a serger are RARE. I have done one in 28 years. Looper positioning on the other hand is very common. Every one uses "Timing" as a catch all phrase in the sewing machine world. I guess people seem to relate to it. I have worked at shops and seen others tell people it was a timing issue, in reality they had the needle in backwards. I have never seen nor heard of an electronic device used on a serger or sewing machine for timing adjustments or checking. I can not even see how it would be possible to use such a device even if it did exist. people say all sorts of things to add value to what ever it is they are selling you.
Reply to
Ron Anderson
That I can believe! In all the crashes and accidents I've had with sewing machines and sergers
Oops!
I think it was for measuring looper positions and clearances rather than timing as such... Light/laser measuring device, I believe, now I come to think about it. Measures in microns, anyway! Just a part of a more general discussion on the innards of sergers and why my sewing machine engineer (respected throughout the UK - we have a long time professional relationship: about 20 years parts and servicing without complaint, and 8 machines, both new and used) no longer services industrial sergers, except for older customers. I don't always remember all the details he comes out with! I think he was advising me not to get an industrial at the time: he knows my house and it really isn't suitable.
I need you to make me think and remember more clearly! ;)
Reply to
Kate Dicey
AKK! The either ate half a paragraph! It should continue: I have NEVER had a timing problem, except with the Lily, when a thread caught deep inside played merry hell with one of the little servo motors (have I remembered that right? One of the internal gizmos, anyway!) that control the fancy stitches tried telling us it was distressed and wanted out! Taking the tension to bits and clearing a bit of thread, plus a general service and internal clean fixed it, and I've had no trouble since. I let the OSMG do it as the machine was still within guarantee.
To see what I can do with a sewing machine crash, take a peep here:
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here:
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the needle was changed in each case, there was no further problem, and Lily carried on as sweetly as ever. Not that I'd recommend this action to anyone... ;P Hm... Must remember to book a service for Lily when the present project is complete.
Reply to
Kate Dicey
I've chopped a few pins in half too... Bad Katie! Mostly, I admit, because I didn't find them all in gathers. I've started using bigger pins with bright glass heads whenever possible.
I often sew over pins, mostly without hassles. It's best to do it slowly. Big pin crashes like these happen when I'm tired/in a hurry/stressed to carelessness. The Huskylock ate the pins just fine, but I did need to replace both blades after a while. Look, I already admitted too killing that poor thing through hard slavery and severe abuse! The new ones will get more loving care, I promise.
The Lily doesn't have a thread sensor, but I have used some odd and strange threads in it. Metallic threads can be particularly okkard and ornery, even with a metallic embroidery needle.
Reply to
Kate Dicey

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