Serger actly sickly :(

With the talk on Kate's post about Serge's woes, I too have a question.
I've got a White 3/4 thread, inexpensive serger (was all I could afford at
the time) and it's about 2 years old. It made a nice overlock stitch and
pretty rolled hem. I had put a thick wad of corduroy through it (I know, I
know) and it went "kerchunk". EVERYTHING locked up, choked up, and my little
serger went into arrest.
I took it to the local SM man and he got it to stitch (after alot of time)
but it will not sew a pretty stitch off the bar and it sounds like it's
barely hitting something (like misaligned). Believe me, DH and I have peared
into the bowels of this machine for long periods of time, turning the
handwheel, and trying to see what's misaligned. We can't find it. It WILL
serge properly but will occasionally skip some stitches. I'm still using it
regularly. I'm not taking it back to the SM guy, because he's at a loss on
how to fix it. I'm going to change the blades (again) and see if that
helps.
I'm concerned it's wearing something down, plus the fact that the occasional
skipped stitches irk me and it won't chain off the bar (without fabric).
Any ideas?
Cindy in WV (who's *strongly* considering investing $$$$ in a coverlock! My
birthday is in a few months!)
Reply to
CindyP
I'm not taking it back to the SM guy, because he's at a loss on
You really need to take it to a repair guy who knows sergers. The local guy who makes the rounds of fabric stores doign repairs doean't have the skill for this. I took my White SL34D back to him there times, the last two with instruction book in hand to show him what it was SUPPOSED to sew like. Call around for a real tech and you'll be fine. My machine does intermittently heavy service on velvets and heavy brocades, and as long as it is properly maintained it does all right.
----------------------------------------------------- Wendy Z Chicago, IL (Moo) Wench Wear Costumes
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#525 AIM=wendylady525
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she be but little, she is fierce""It's the little ones you have to watch out for...""I'm not short - I'm concentrated"--------------------------------------------------------
Reply to
zski
zski stood on a soapbox and shouted to anyone who would listen :
what she said. I have a baby lock that I had to show the guy how it worked, not a good sign for an ongoing relationship with a mechanic.
penny s
Reply to
Penny S
cutting blades? They make a tremendous difference, and should have been put in before the repairman attempted to re-align the timing. Cea<
Yes, I changed the needles when I got it home and that helped. He changed the blades, but I'm going to do it myself again since I've been using it alot lately.
He's the *only* sewing machine repairman close to me (I live in a very rural area). It's already cost for the first repair and I don't want to invest alot more money into a $300 serger ...especially if they can't get it fixed. I just feel like that machine should have been able to handle the corduroy (stitched over some bulky, thick seams). I used to have a National serger that would sew through anything.
Cindy in WV (who's still comparing features of the latest coverlocks and dreaming...)
Reply to
CindyP
Penny, how are you? I hope the kidney stones are/have moved on out, and you are feeling better. If this has been a recurring situation, I recommend lithotripter, my DH was fine after he had it.
-- Beverly ---to reply, delete no spam and .invalid---
Reply to
BEI Design
It sounds like your little serger might be out of time. I would think the repairman would have caught the problem though it that what is the problem.
Reply to
Jenni No
Could the lower looper be grazing one or both of the needles when it's moving toward the left? Sometimes an improperly adjusted needle guard will push the needle(s) into the looper and can cause intermittent skipped stitches.
gwh
Reply to
G. Wayne Hines
Ooh, have you been ill with those? Nasty! Have some positive waves of 'get better soon'.
-- Kate XXXXXX Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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on Kate's Pages and explore!
Reply to
Kate Dicey
I'll check it again, but we couldn't see it grazing anything (and we studied it for a long time with a flashlight). I still ought to change the blades again...that might help with the occasional skipped stitch. My husband is traveling to Knoxville in a week. I may get Best Sewing's repairman to look at it even though I really don't want to invest much more money in this inexpensive little machine.
I personally am pleased with the White sergers for general sewing purposes. This one made a nice rolled hem. I do feel like it should have been able to handle the corduroy a little better.
Have been checking out some of the newer overlocks on the internet and calling some shops for prices. Do any of you have any opinions on the TOL pfaff/viking/babylock/singer sergers? I'd like to testdrive some in a few weeks and start saving my pennies.
Cindy in WV, where the weather has been glorious
Reply to
CindyP
Also check for a burr on the lower looper: you'll feel it catch on a thumb nail. A gentle smoothing with a very fine emery board or a bit of emery cloth has been known to fix this problem...
I'm with you there! When I bought my old 3 thread toyota serger, the ability to cope with corduroy and several layers of Polartec as well as an unbeatable rolled edge was a nececity, and the machine is still going strong. I would nOT have sold my sister a bit of junk! I had a hard time matching it for quality and effort, and ended up buying the big Husqvarna 910 as being one of only two domestic sergers I found that would match or exceed the little Toyota on these things. The other was a Bernina. Juki were not sold in the UK at the time, but i hear quite good things of them.
I have the HV 910 and a friend has the 936. They are hard to beat. My sewing machine man's daughter has the Bernina TOTL one and swears it's perfect in every way. I can believe her! :) You can see what my HV Huskylock does over on my web site. Others that I have found good (if equally expensive!) are the Bernina ones, a nice little Frister & Rossman (not up to the volume I do), Toyota (budget, and good value for money).
I'm not so keen on Babylock, but it's a while since I used one, (and I think that was a budget special), I've hated the feel and quality of every Janome one I've looked at and tried, and I don't rate Singer at all for modern machines.
If I was buying today, I'd look first at HV and Bernina, then at Juki, and possibly after that at Toyota and Frister & Rossman for more budget end machines.
-- Kate XXXXXX Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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on Kate's Pages and explore!
Reply to
Kate Dicey
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net stood on a soapbox and shouted to anyone who
Cea, I have the very same serger, and I can tell this. Replacing both blades on a somewhat regular basis has made a huge difference in how well it performs. Ron of A1 has very good prices on them. I couldn't believe the difference. I thought my timing was out and it was the blades. I used to never change them also, but I've changed my tune.
great little serger, eh?
Penny S
Reply to
Penny S
Kate Dicey stood on a soapbox and shouted to anyone who would listen :
first time, they aren't moved yet, waiting on a call this am to see about plan b
p.
Reply to
Penny S
Re: Serger sick/ Checking out new sergers
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net stood on a soapbox and shouted to anyone who (snorfle) =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0If the top blade doesn't show signs of wear, it doesn't need replacing. The lower (fixed) blade _rarely_ ever needs replacing, or so my manual says, and the fixed blade on my Babylock serger is going on 16 years old. ++++ {{{{{___OK, correction here--the TOP blade is the Fixed blade, the bottom blade is a softer metal, and the bottom blade needs replacing quite often to maximize performance{{{{{{ ++++ I do plan to replace it soon, though, in light of the very rare problems I am having with BL. It's a #4-428, purchased in 1987, and used heavily in my alterations business, as well as for personal use. It's a 2-3-4 thread, with built-in rolled hem. It recently began to balk at cutting very thick fabrics, and I'm also getting the occasional skipped stitches and some other ailments. Once the blade is replaced, if the problem still exists, I'll check the loopers as gwh recommended. =A0=A0=A0=A0I have 2 older sergers which I acquired more recently, and they have a roll hem foot/finger which has to be put on with screws--a real time-waster, kind of annoying, although they run well and are good 'spares'. =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0= =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0= =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0Cea
Reply to
sewingbythecea
Penny, best of luck. I know DH just _loved_ screening for the little buggers. ;-} His turned out to be calcium based, so we had to reduce all dairy and dark green leafy veggies, among other things.
-- Beverly ---to reply, delete no spam and .invalid---
Reply to
BEI Design
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net stood on a soapbox and shouted to anyone who would listen :
do them both at the same time, you'll be amazed at the results. Ron's prices are so good that I bought 2 or 3 of both top and bottom. I think it's BS that they say never to replace the top blade.
penny
Reply to
Penny S
Thanks, Kate, for the good advice. It's hard for me to find a Bernina dealer close, but I might be willing to travel.
The HV 936 intrigues me as does the pfaff 4872. This will be for my birthday in June, so I've got a *little* time to save some money. I'll also check into the Berninas.
My sister has an older Toyota serger that she would never part with. She does heavy-duty sewing and that little machine is put through the fire. She loves it.
Cindy
Reply to
CindyP
BEI Design stood on a soapbox and shouted to anyone who would listen :
yep going under this afternoon for some sort of scoping procedure. Oh, well, what's s a few more days lost of things to do....
p.
Reply to
Penny S
Thanks to all of you for the excellent ideas...
I'll try running my fingernail over the lower looper to check for burrs and also try the black construction paper test (what a neat experiment!!) Boy, if you could get all the great minds from this NG together in one room, the place would explode :)
I'd love to get this serger in tiptop shape without alot more expense but still want the new one...it'd be nice to have this one for a spare. I used to have a 15 year-old National serger and gave it to a dear friend. It was a REAL workhorse, heavy-duty, solid machine. It'd sew through anything and never skip a stitch...and I really miss that.
Will let you know how your ideas work.
Cindy in WV, who is basking in all this warm sunshine
Reply to
CindyP

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