using curtain Cloth for summer skirts

If you like it, why not?
I used to remark bitterly of many of the clothes I wore as a child "it looks like curtain material."
Very likely it was. Mom bought fabric in lots, unseen, specifying only the weight.
Reply to
cycjec
I have done this for many years. I particularly remember, more than 25 years ago, sailing out to the Opera one summer evening in a floor length skirt made from a $2 remnant of drapery fabric. Very posh, I was, in that skirt, high heeled city sandals and no stockings or slip - the fabric was firm enough not to need either support or sight blocker and the theatre was not air-conditioned.
Olwyn Mary in New Orleans. ** Posted from
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Reply to
Olwyn Mary
One of my favorite skirts when I was growing-up (1970s) was made by my Grandmama from chintz. It had a beautiful floral pattern that worked well as a dirndl skirt. She also made a little shawl out of coordinating chintz that she trimmed with white lace. When I wore this outfit with a white peasant blouse, it looked like folk costume!
Erin
Reply to
Erin
>> I am sewing summer skirts , a lot of times from Curtain cloth , >> mirjam > > > I have done this for many years. I particularly remember, more than 25 > years ago, sailing out to the Opera one summer evening in a floor length > skirt made from a $2 remnant of drapery fabric. Very posh, I was, in > that skirt, high heeled city sandals and no stockings or slip - the > fabric was firm enough not to need either support or sight blocker and > the theatre was not air-conditioned. > > Olwyn Mary in New Orleans. > ** Posted from
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**I use curtain fabric a lot for costumes. Less for other clothing these days, but it can still be fun.
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
LOL Once for an office Christmas party (in my very-much-younger and single days), I made a long, halter-style dress of red crushed velvet that came from a sale table. Someone told me later that one of our pious co-workers had made a snide remark about it looking like 'upholstery material'. I just considered the source...remembering that the guys had seemed to like it just fine.
Doreen in Alabama
Reply to
Doreen Hendrix
Aha Doreen ,,, haven`t you read the book or seen the film "GONE WITH THE WIND"? :>:>:>:>:> Creative people can make nice things with whatever they find... and "Those remarks are mostly done by those who won`t do the creative effort.... After some years it stopped bothering me ,,, sometimes i offer those people to make something for them ,,, I dress with clothes that fit me and my needs, and that is that ,,, And i can even vouch that it hepled me to get my Museum exhibition , the curator wrote in an article that she noted my `different` clothes ,,,,, Thus go on use what ever you like ,,, mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
Kate i went to your site ,,, you are a Lady with Great Humour yourself ,,, i will have to revisit your site ,, too much to see in one visit !!! mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
Cycjec I think we all [esp over a ceratin age!!!] had clothes made of Whatever our mothers could buy .or remake. My daughter`s first nighty was made from my Pink Cotton Army pj,,,, she never complained , my son`s first pj i made from old shirts of my husband . [they already had buttons :>:>:>:] mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
Wow Erin , i loved this description ,,, do you have a photo ??? Don`t you think that this is Just How the `old traditional FOLK costumes were born ??? mirjam mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
Thank you. Glad you had fun. My Three Dancing Princes were dressed in the finest curtain fabrics in the world - they cost £1.25 a meter! :D
Oh, and in the wedding stuff... The blue page boy suits and the two floral dresses? Curtain fabric! Mind you, that was less of a bargain, as the glorious blue wool was a Scottish one woven for making curtains for drafty castles and Scottish Baronial style mansions, and the floral was a hand brinted silk woven and printed here in England, at £52 and £54 per meter respectively. Shame I don't have better pix of those, but they were taken before I got the child sized dress dummy.
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
When I started sewing in earnest (this was AFTER I had taken home ec for three years), my mom generously offered me the use of anything in her fabric stash -- which was home dec fabrics, because she was a home dec sewist as opposed to an apparel sewist.
I still love using drapery fabric for clothing, but I have learned not to tell employees of Calico Corners what I am planning on using their fabric for.
Reply to
Samantha Hill - remove TRASH t
I'm afraid I have very few pictures of me as a child. I, too, would love to have pictures of the beautiful outfits my Grandmama made me.
Erin
Reply to
Erin
I once went into the Curtain Shop with one of my skirts that came from their stock ,The shop keeper + 2 of his workers , [all males] , Looked smiled and than one said to me , I love the way you use our cloth ... mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
Erin Do you Still have some remnants of those clothes ???? than you could make an applique from it ,,, if not could you ? would you find a painter Describe the dress to him/her and maybe a drawing could be made for you ,,, I lately saw such a drawing ,, and it really was heart touching . mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
>> Aha Doreen ,,, haven`t you read the book or seen the film "GONE WITH >> THE WIND"? >> :>:>:>:>:> > > If you haven't seen Carol Burnett in the role, you can see it here: >
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, this is a MUST SEE!!!!!! I found it a few months ago, and I was so glad, because I remember seeing it the first time.
Reply to
Samantha Hill - remove TRASH t

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