New here - first lathe

New here, just got my first lathe - a funky old Craftsman, looks like it was
from back in the day when Craftsman tools were still pretty good (I'm a
woodworker and I know whereof I speak).
Round tube, maybe 36", Morse #1, motor sitting behind it with five-position
pulleys and a loosey-goosey belt that you can move easily to adjust the
speed. It doesn't seem to have been abused - the plates and all the decals
are still on it, wonder of wonders, but the belt guard has been removed and
discarded or lost, as you would expect on an old citizen like this.
Came with a miscellaneous selection of turning tools, a few gouges and
skews, a couple parting tools and a scraper or two. Live center, keyed
chuck, arbor for polishing wheels. Pretty well turned out, but no face
plate. We'll go ahead and use it pretty much as-is for a small upcoming
project, but when winter sets in I look forward to sprucing it up.
Here are the numbers. Ring any bells?
Model: 113.23801
Serial: 0219.P0073
Best regards,
Tom
Reply to
tdacon
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I bought one of those exact lathes once for $5 - it's usable for spindle work but it isn't very rigid. you will find information about it at lathes.com.uk and you will find folks who like old wood working machines at
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Reply to
.
Get rid of it--quick, before it's too late! That is the kind of lathe that got me hooked. Although mine is a Harbor Fright. I still use it as a buffing machine and do my turning on a bigger machine.
Reply to
G. Ross
Welcome to the world of rotary addiction.... My name is Mac and I'm a woodturner...
Good starter lathe, be careful and have fun....
Reply to
Mac Davis
As Mac has said, (and the other two have intimated) "My name is Deb and I am a woodturner."
It is an addiction, but a wonderful one.
I would agree, your Craftsman is a good place to start. You will do one of three things with it.
You will decide you do not like turning You will find you really do not like it but find it valuable and just keep the Craftsman But, in all probability, you will become addicted and soon learn that your Craftsman is limited and start looking around for something bigger and better. I have two words for you when this symptom hits "Craigs List."
Your Craftsman has a #1 Morris taper, most have a #2. I am not sure of the threads on the headstock spindle, but 1x8 is common for the midsized lathes and 1 1/4 x8 for the larger midsize lathes. So go light on buying a chuck (i.e., shop around) unless it has an insert that allows you to change thread sizes.
Lastly and MOST IMPORTANTLY. GET A FACE SHIELD
Yes, woodturning clubs are nice, new tools are wonderful, Youtube videos are great. But a face shield will save you in three ways:
A trip to the dentist to have that stub front tooth pulled A trip to the plastic surgeon to have that nasty gouge in your face sown up A trip to the cemetery (No this is not hyperbole - it really happens)
You really, at this point have no idea just how much kenetic energy that spinning piece of wood has. You will learn "When" (not if) you get your first major catch (gouge hits wood at wrong angle, wood reacts in an unpredictable manner), or a piece just flies off. Its very startling to hear "Thwack" and feel a force against the face shield. (But YOU are okay, except for needing a new pair of shorts, that is). Imagine that withouit the face shield.
You do not have to spend a fortune, one from Harbor Freight works just fine. But get one ASAP,
Deb
Reply to
Dr. Deb
I bought one of those exact lathes once for $5 - it's usable for spindle work but it isn't very rigid. you will find information about it at lathes.com.uk and you will find folks who like old wood working machines at
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Fortunately, spindle work is what we bought it for, so this one will work fine at least for a starter lathe, once it's spiffed up a little.
The lathes.com.uk link seems to be gone, but owwm is a good resource - I found a couple pictures of lathes with pretty close model numbers.
Tom
Reply to
tdacon

As Mac has said, (and the other two have intimated) "My name is Deb and I am a woodturner."
It is an addiction, but a wonderful one.
I would agree, your Craftsman is a good place to start. You will do one of three things with it.
You will decide you do not like turning You will find you really do not like it but find it valuable and just keep the Craftsman But, in all probability, you will become addicted and soon learn that your Craftsman is limited and start looking around for something bigger and better. I have two words for you when this symptom hits "Craigs List."
Your Craftsman has a #1 Morris taper, most have a #2. I am not sure of the threads on the headstock spindle, but 1x8 is common for the midsized lathes and 1 1/4 x8 for the larger midsize lathes. So go light on buying a chuck (i.e., shop around) unless it has an insert that allows you to change thread sizes.
Lastly and MOST IMPORTANTLY. GET A FACE SHIELD
Yes, woodturning clubs are nice, new tools are wonderful, Youtube videos are great. But a face shield will save you in three ways:
A trip to the dentist to have that stub front tooth pulled A trip to the plastic surgeon to have that nasty gouge in your face sown up A trip to the cemetery (No this is not hyperbole - it really happens)
You really, at this point have no idea just how much kenetic energy that spinning piece of wood has. You will learn "When" (not if) you get your first major catch (gouge hits wood at wrong angle, wood reacts in an unpredictable manner), or a piece just flies off. Its very startling to hear "Thwack" and feel a force against the face shield. (But YOU are okay, except for needing a new pair of shorts, that is). Imagine that withouit the face shield.
You do not have to spend a fortune, one from Harbor Freight works just fine. But get one ASAP,
Deb
That sounds like real good advice.
Thanks, Tom
Reply to
tdacon
In article ,
Not quite the last - think about how you keep all that wood dust out of you lungs, it doesn't do you any good in there.
Reply to
Stuart
As my mentor told me.... "wear eye protection of your next turning might be a white cane"... As your other woodworking tools, ride that line between respect and fear and you'll do far less dumb things (like I seem to do almost daily)
Reply to
Mac Davis
In article ,
Like Me too!
I was replacing an old gatepost that had ben screwed to a brick wall. Some of the screws were impossible to remove (rusted in) but I got the rotting post off the wall and picked up the angle grider to hack off the projecting screws. I had to remove the guard to get in close.
Next job, a while later, was taking some length off the "hardened stainless steel" bar of a digital readout and I hadn't got round to putting the guard back on. I now have a deep, slowly healing, gash in the left edge of my left hand!
Reply to
Stuart
On Sun, 18 Aug 2013 11:59:14 +0100, Stuart wrote:
OUCH!
I usually do things like knowing not to reach across the lathe to adjust something and doing it anyway... usually getting a good rap on the knuckles, expecially by wing bowls...
Reply to
Mac Davis
I have a face plate I believe 3/4" thread belonged to my dad possibly shop smith. My Lathe is 1 1/8 and I have a face plate so if it would work shipping cost would cover it. Sent an e-mail
Mike M
Reply to
Mike M
I have a face plate I believe 3/4" thread belonged to my dad possibly shop smith. My Lathe is 1 1/8 and I have a face plate so if it would work shipping cost would cover it. Sent an e-mail
Thanks for the offer, Mike. I'll take a look at it and see what the threads are.
Tom
Reply to
tdacon
I have a face plate I believe 3/4" thread belonged to my dad possibly shop smith. My Lathe is 1 1/8 and I have a face plate so if it would work shipping cost would cover it. Sent an e-mail
Mike, I checked the threads on the headstock and it's 3/4 x 16. If that's what your face plate is we've got a deal. Email me offline please and I'll give you the address and mail you a check if you know what the shipping would be.
Thanks, Tom
Reply to
tdacon
if you find you need more faceplates, visit my site,
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and click on faceplates - I try to make them as inexpensively as I can for those in the hobby - I make a little, it pays for the tooling but mostly I make them for the fun of making them.
Reply to
.
Mike, I've submitted my application for permission to reply to your email. Here's hoping that you will approve my request.
Tom

Apparently came up with the wrong e-mail, I've tried again.
Reply to
Tom Dacon
On Fri, 16 Aug 2013 22:43:38 -0500, tdacon wrote (in message ):
I had this same lathe many years ago. Still have the chisels that I got with it. Am addicted worse than ever to turning, thanks to this lathe. You will like it, learn from it, and want a better one eventually. Good for spindle work. You can manage some faceplate work with it, too, but slowly. tom koehler
Reply to
tom koehler

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