liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?

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I have some 72" long red tulle fabric that had to have 1" pockets at each
end of the 36" width.  For the pockets, I was originally going to try just
sewing them on a machine but I have to confess that I know nothing about
sewing and have never done it, so I decided to try Liquid Stitch. The type I
used is the "original" type that Walmart carries.  No iron, just apply and
let dry.  I ran into some difficulties though and had to use fairly large
amounts in spots to keep the fabric together.  It says 24 hours before being
able to be exposed to water on the Liquid Stitch tube, but it has been about
15 hours and the liquid stitched spots still stick together if I try to fold
the fabric together.  I guess my question is, how long will it take before
the Liquid Stitch dries completely?   Another question:  If I had tried to
sew these pockets, would I have been able to do it on one of those small,
hand-held sewing machines?  Walmart has those, but I don't know if they're
any good.  If I can't get this Liquid Stitch to dry faster, I may have to
redo the fabric and sew it next time.  I was thinking of placing the fabric
out in the sun.  It's hot here, about 85 degrees F and moderately humid.

Thanks in advance,
Al


Re: liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?
I'm waiting on the clothes dryer and thought I'd study your question.  First
I wondered why you'd want a 1" pocket - decided maybe you were making a rod
pocket for some sort of 'curtain'.  ???
Tulle is contrary.  You know that already.
I looked at Liquid Stitch directions and it really does say dry 24 hours.
Bummer.
The hand-held sewing machine is not a good investment.
If you have a friend who sews, it shouldn't take more than 5 minutes to sew
the pocket.
Duct tape would work but would be rather unattractive.
I considered iron-on hemming tape and rejected the idea.
Why don't you simply get a spool of red thread and a needle?  Hemming won't
take long to do by hand and when gathered up your stitches won't have to be
pretty or perfect.  HTH.  Polly

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Re: liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?
Thanks, Polly.  If it continues to be somewhat "tacky", I might end up going
with the manually threaded option.  Of course, it hasn't even been 24 hours
yet for the Liquid Stitch seams, so that might be why the fabric still wants
to stick when I bring the seams together.

I'll have to look into hemming by hand.  Never done it, have a dry cleaner
that does it but never for something this big.  I'd have to do pockets for
each 72" section, top and bottom, so 144" total.  Not sure how long it would
take for a beginner like me.  Of course, I'll have to start over with new
tulle but it's cheap enough so not a problem.

I'll give the Liquid Stitch a little more time.

Al

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Re: liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?
Nearly impossible for me to think in lines of 'don't sew' . . . however, a
cool glue gun or just plain old staples might work.  I know the instructions
say no iron - but - what about waving it with your hair dryer - not too hot
and not too close?   Polly


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Re: liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?
On Thu, 26 May 2011 09:43:14 -0500, "Polly Esther"

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Seconded:  a needle is the only hand-held sewing device that actually
works, and tulle is particularly easy to sew by hand -- you can see
both sides at once, and since you are putting the needle through
pre-existing holes, you can get along without a thimble.  I'd suggest
getting one of those rubber-like thimbles anyway, just to get used to
the idea.  Put it on whichever finger you find yourself pushing with.
All you have to do is to weave the needle through the fabric, then
pull it out in the direction that pulls the thread in.  After a little
practice, you can pleat the tulle onto the needle to work faster.  

Knotted ends are no good on tulle.  Begin and end by taking three or
four stitches in the same place.  

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?


Albert Jonson wrote:
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Sewing is not brain surgery.  ;->  It would be a big help if
you explained what the finished product will be used for.
Will the "pockets" have any stress on them?  Do they have to
gather nicely (on a rod for instance)?  If either of those
is correct, I think you will be disappointed in the "Liquid
Stitch".  My Dad used it one time to hem some pants, (I have
no idea why he didn't just ask me to do it!), and the result
was so stiff he looked like he had "hooped pants". LOL  In
addition, the line of glue did not survive the first pass
through a washing machine.

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If the instructions say "24 hours", I think you may safely
rely upon their being ready after "24 hours".  The
manufacturer probably did at least some research before
putting the product on the retail market.  It may take that
long for whatever chemical reaction takes place and it
"dries".

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If you are just hemming this tulle (no stress or gathering
involved), it (the liquid stitch) might work, and you may be
able to speed drying time with a hair dryer.  Place waxed
paper behind the line of goo, so it doesn't run onto the
working surface.  We used tiny dots of glue (I don't
remember the brand it was 29+ years ago) to randomly place
faux pearls scattered all over my DD's bridal veil.  That
worked fine, they stayed put, at least through the ceremony
and reception.  :-)

As to the "hand held sewing machines" = RUN AWAY!  At the
very least look at some reviews online before investing $
.01 in any of them.  You would be far better off getting a
good used machine at a sewing machine shop or thrift store.

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?
I'm late to the party, I know, but for future reference I just watched a la
ndscape quilt artist iron Liquid Thread dry. She did use a Teflon sheet. Be
tcha don't have one, right?  But I guess freezer paper or even waxed paper  
would work to keep your iron from getting gummed up.

Not that it matters at this point, but if I wanted to make a rod pocket in  
a fabric like tulle without sewing, I would sandwich the edge to be closed  
between ribbons of iron on hem tape.  

Re: liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?
On Wednesday, March 21, 2018 at 8:28:30 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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Seven years.
I know, but for future reference I just watched a landscape quilt artist iron Liquid Thread dry. She did use a Teflon sheet. Betcha don't have one, right?  But I guess freezer paper or even waxed paper would work to keep your iron from getting gummed up.
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I don't know that it would but I would question if the wax from the wax
paper would leave a residue on the material.  I'd opt for parchment paper.
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ONLY if I didn't have a sewing machine.


Re: liquid stitch drying time? Sewing options?
ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:
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I suspect sheriramirez10 was actually looking for "alt.gluing",  
"alt.quick-glue-gun-projects", "alt.sewing-avoidance",

... or something.   ;-O  


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