Adding eggs one at a time to batter

Is there really any benefit adding eggs one at a time instead of all
together in a cheesecake recipe? Adding four eggs one at a time would seem
to promote overbeating the batter, which I understand is not good for
cheescakes. Am I missing something? Thanks! --- John
Reply to
John
Overbeating isn't the issue with cheesecakes. The issue is beating air into the batter. You can stir it at a low speed for a long time without any problem. Here is my theory on mixing the eggs in one at a time. If you mix a small amount of liquid into the mix it will be evenly distributed. It you mix a lot of liquid into the mix at once there is a tendency to have "islands" or chunks of the cream cheese form in the sea of liquid. It will be much harder to break up the chunks of cheese and form a smooth emulsion than it would be to mix in the eggs slowly.
Reply to
Vox Humana
Thanks for the clarification, I see exactly what you mean about the "islands" forming in the liquid. Just a question about stirring - I use a small electric hand mixer on low speed for the softened cheese and sugar, then a wooden spoon to slowly stir in everything else after that. If I ever get a KitchenAid mixer (hopefully), could it be used instead to slowly stir the ingredients? Thanks again. --- John
Reply to
John
I use my KA mixer for cheesecake. I put it on slow (speed 2) and soften the cheese. Then I add the sugar and cornstarch. When that is thoroughly combined, I turn it up a bit and add the eggs, one at a time. As soon as the last egg is incorporated, I turn it off and add the cream, stirring with a spatula. You just have to avoid turning the mixer to high and beating. It takes a few minutes longer to do it at low speed, but the product is better.
Reply to
Vox Humana
Don't mean to intrude here, but I think I have a couple answers for you :)
First, adding eggs seperately does two things, actually. In baking cakes, cheesecakes, etc, you want the batter to be very homogenous. Adding the eggs seperately keeps the batter homogenous, and also controls the amount of air beaten in. You actually beat less to add them seperately than you would need to beat the batter when adding a "lump sum" of a fluid ingredient. This is the same reason that you add the liquid and flour seperately when baking a cake. (Partially, at least).
I will post a recipe for you, it makes the mose decadent, creamy, sinful cheesecake I've ever laid tastebuds on. It's really the best recipe I've ever found for cheesecake. You'll notice it is done in a food processor. The reason for this is because processors incorporate very little air. The results of using it, as opposed to say, a mixer with the wire whisk attachment, are worlds apart. One is creamy and smooth, the other is fluffy and somewhat grainy. If you don't have a processor you can use a Kitchen Aid or similar stand mixer, but do the following: -Use the paddle attachment, not the whisk -Make sure all the ingredients are room temp before beginning -keep mixer speed low
Here's the recipe: Creamy Lemon Cheesecake
NOTE: You can make this *any* flavor. Just follow a couple simple rules: First, if making chocolate cheesecake, use melted chocolate, not cocoa or "liquid chocolate" or Hershey's syrup. And when using other flavors, whether it be orange juice, or liquer, don't add more than 1/4-1/3 cup addditional liquid.
Crust: 4 cups graham cracker crumbs 2 sticks unsalted butter, melted
Combine until it looks like wet sand, then pour into a 9" springform pan. Rotate the pan to get a light coating of crumbs all around the sides. Press as you go. Press remaining mixture into the bottom. Set aside, and preheat oven to 325*f.
For the cheesecake: 20 oz cream cheese 1 cup + 2 Tbsp (8 oz) sugar 1 7/8 cup (16 oz) sour cream 3 large eggs 1/3 cup strained freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 Tbsp very finely grated lemon zest (if you have a Microplane, it works beautifully)
Place cream cheese and sugar into the bowl of your food processor and blend until very smooth. Make sure there are no lumps, because once you add liquids, you will never get them out. Scrape down the bowl. Add the sour cream an dprocess until smooth again. Add the eggs, one at a time, pulsing to incorporate each egg before adding the next. Scrape down the bowl. Add the lemon juice (or whatever flavoring you chose), and lemon zest (omit if using other flavor) and combine well. Pour into the crust and set on a sheet pan with 1/2 inch sides to catch any butter that leaks out. Bake 1 hour 20 minutes to 1 hour 30 minutes, or until cheesecake is set around edges, but still has a loose looking, creamy area about 2-3 inches across directly in the center. This will firm up when chilled. Remove from oven and place on a rack to cool completely. Do not refrigerate until completely cooled. This will prevent cracks, and keep the consistency even throughout.
Good luck! kimberly
Reply to
Nexis
What are your opinions on putting water in the dish that the cheesecake sits in. I found this help to keep any cracks from forming.
distributed.
Reply to
ponder
It depends on the recipe. Recipes without flour or other starch tend to benefit more from the water bath method than other recipes. The recipe I posted, however, should be done just as it says in the intructions. If you test it as described, it will come out perfect. Cool it slowly to room temp completely before chilling, and there shouldn't be any cracks. You can also loosen the crust from the sides of the pan with an offset spatula.
kimberly
Reply to
Nexis

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