Best by date on rye flour

Have a once opened but barely used and well sealed sack of KA rye flour dated 6-6-07. Today is 1-4-08. Thoughts about using or not using it? (Using it will save a trip to the store.) Want to bake a sourdough rye. Pierre
Reply to
Pierre
"R. Fizek" wrote in news:T2Dfj.74$sH.64@trnddc04:
Back then, people actually did more cooking from scratch, and as such "sell by/use by" dates were irrelevant. Until I started working nights, I bought 25# bags of flour and would go through that in a bout 2 weeks between making sandwich bread, rolls, cakes, cookies, etc. That use by date was irrelevant to me.
Reply to
M. Halbrook

You've probably already made up your mind, but here's my $0.02 anyway.
The flour's probably rancid by now (personally, I'd skip it). But if you're determined to use it, smell and taste a bit; if it's gone over, you'll know immediately. You should probably also run a bit of flour through a sieve and inspect for bugs -- well-sealed or not, it's possible the package came into your home with bugs/larvae/eggs.
HTH -j
Reply to
jacqui{JB}
"M. Halbrook" ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) writes:
No, I suspect it's more they actually trusted their senses. Remember, "before" is a long time. There was a time when in various situations one had to stock up for the year. There was also no central storage facility, so once the harvest was over, there was no more until the next year, so the clock starts ticking.
So if that bag of flour was really rancid smelling, then they might discard it. If there were bugs in there, they might discard it. They looked, and touched, and smelled, and used that to decide whether the food was useable or not.
They likely also knew the tricks to compensate, so if that baking soda wasn't as potent as it used to be, they knew what to do to ensure the flapjacks were still good.
But, I get the impression they also weren't as fussy. "A bit of mold on that cheese? No problem, we'll eat around it. We can't afford to waste it."
They also were likely more careful about keeping food. They knew the harvest had to keep until next year, so they put in the effort to store it properly, for the least food wasteage
The "best before" is a result of an isolation from the food, or at the very least an isolation of the food from where it comes. Let someone else take care of the problem.
Michael
Reply to
Michael Black
On Jan 5, 6:00 am, "jacqui{JB}" wrote:
JB: I took yours and others advice. . .no bugs, smells fine. I'll have a run at it. Thanks for all.
Pierre
Reply to
Pierre
Eat around it? Cheese *is* mold, or mold is cheese.
But you're quite correct about learning to use and trust your senses, rather than some overly cautious "Use-by" date. With careful storage, most foods are fine, well after the date a store shouldn't sell them.
Dave
Reply to
Dave Bell
Dave Bell ( snipped-for-privacy@TheSPAMFREEBells.net) writes:
Some is, some isn't.
There was a period when I made tofu for a couple of years (and stopped because for the return it was quite a bit of work). I suddenly understood all that bit about "curds and whey" in reference to cheese, since the process is similar with tofu. No mold involved, there is a coagulant to solidify things. Obviously some cheeses do involve mold, but not all.
And oddly, you can have mold growing on items that do involve mold. I better throw out that yogurt, because while the process of making yogurt involves mold, that bit sitting at the back of the refrigerator for too many weeks has some other unwanted kind of mold on it.
Michael
Reply to
Michael Black
All true... I was taking some liberties, saying cheese == mold. The point was that for most (aged) cheeses, the primary mold to grown on it is the same as grew in it. As for yogurt - you're right to toss it. Yogurt is fermented by a bacterium, and any mold you see is a foreign overgrowth.
Dave
Reply to
Dave Bell
In article , snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...
I usually refrigerate or freeze my rye flours and all my whole wheat flours. This gives them a very long shelf life. If your flour has been refrigerated or frozen, go ahead and use it, you should be fine.
If you haven't refrigerated or frozen your flour, that's a tougher call. If it is a light rye, I think there is no problem. With a medium or dark rye, there could be issues.
In any case, I'd smell it. The key problem with whole grain flours is that the oils in them can get rancid. If you smell rancid or funky notes, pitch the flour and buy fresh. Rancidity is a chemical breakdown of the oils through oxidation, and it is not a short term health problem, and not a long term one if you don't make a steady diet of rancid foods. However, they are not as wholesome - or tasty - as fresh foods.
Hope that helps. Mike
Reply to
Mike Avery

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