newbie grinder question

Can I get some hints and tips on removing stuck grinder bits? What are
the best tools and or lubricants for removal?
Reply to
EZ$
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An ounce of prevention vs. pound of cure. A little Vaseline on the bit/shaft, next time.
Having been there, I used a small 2 jaw gear puller and a shot of penetrating oil.
If the grinder head is well up toward the top of the shaft, meaning you were grinding on the bottom of the bit, sometimes you can use the penetrating oil and a small punch and hammer. Knock the bit downward, loosening the corrosion, and then pull the bit off.
You DID remember to loosen the setscrew, didn't you?
Reply to
Moonraker
A couple more ideas;
A small butane torch heating the brass grinder bit will cause it to expand faster than the steel grinder shaft. Get it hot and then use a small pry bar under the bit and lift it. May want to wait until all the WD 40 or Liquid Wrench has evaporated before you go hitting it with a torch, though. KA- BOOM. ;
Reply to
Moonraker
As a real last resort, I had a customer send a Wizard, with a really badly stuck head, back to Inland and they promptly sent her a new grinder!
Reply to
glassman
Do the bits stick due to the shaft rusting?. I was wondering because I have a Kristall 2000S grinder and the problem has never arisen, I presume the motor shaft is stainless steel.
Reply to
David Billington
Do the bits stick due to the shaft rusting?. I was wondering because I have a Kristall 2000S grinder and the problem has never arisen, I presume the motor shaft is stainless steel. -----------------------------------------------------------------
The bits usually get stuck because you don't use the grinder for a while and the glass mud seeps down inbetween the shaft and the bit and then the bit gets stuck. I have seen them rusted but rarely. Take the bit off now and then and wipe the shaft with a some vaseoline and they'll come off very easily. I also rub the shaft with some steel wool every once in a while...keeps it clean and smooth.
Scratch
Reply to
royaltd97
Actually in a perfect world, you're supposed to remove grinding bits and iron tips after each use..... no one does.
-- JK Sinrod
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www.MyConeyIslandMemories
Reply to
JKSinrod
Thanks, I expect that why I have never had a problem as after use I clean it up and put it back in its drawer with the bit removed and put the bit back amongst the collection of other bits.
Reply to
David Billington
David, David, David....
Stained Glass shops are SUPPOSED to be cluttered and messy. Whatever are we going to do with you?
If you clean up your tools and put them up, people will think you haven't been doing any work. Half the fun is looking for your glass cutter and pliers.
Reply to
Moonraker
Moonraker don't worry about the mess I can provide plenty of evidence for it if required. I don't do stained glass but the grinder is used in preparation of slumped items and preparation and finishing of blown glass items and is usually used in the kitchen and even without a SO at the moment I clean up afterwards. Certain areas of the workshop such as the machining area are usually cleaned daily after use, at least all tools are put back in their respective homes. Its mainly out of respect for the tools and the potential for serious personal injury if machine tools are not given proper respect and kept clean and free of debris and distractions. Other areas can get cluttered, I suppose much like your stained glass workshop, thats not so much of an issue, but the main workshop is due for a good clean and tossing of those little bits that just might be of use.
Reply to
David Billington
When I read JK's comment that in a "perfect world" you remove the bit, I started thinkin' I don't ever want to live in a perfect world...it sounds FAR to anal to me to be any fun!
Then when David stated that he actually DOES do that...well, calling Mr. Monk! (do you remove your soldering tips, too?) However, being relatively new, maybe I missed "Cleanliness is next to Godliness 101". The doubts, crushing and black, started to creep in....
Then Moonie came to the rescue! Yay!!!! I can relax into this pigpen I lovingly call my "studio" and appear busy to my hearts' content!
Lori
Reply to
FlameNwind
In over 25 years, I've never put a tool away or cleaned one. Never lost one either. I sweep up once in a while and throw a few things away but that's pretty much it. I've never had my tools complain that they don't get no respect but then who knows what they do when I'm not around. I had a friend that was very anal about keeping his shop clean...I think i could have had surgery in there. I dunn...life's kinda short to have to worry too much about some stuff.
Andy
Reply to
neoglassic

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