only slightly OT: tunisian crochet

We were discussing Tunisian crochet/afghan stitch awhile ago. I was
intrigued by a project I saw on "Knitting and Crochet Today" on PBS some
months ago, but had trouble finding a reasonably priced HUGE Tunisian
crochet needle. Well, I finally got one and am ready to get started. And
in a serendipitous spot of synchronicity (say THAT ten times!), the show
was repeated last week - just the second time I ever tuned in! (Usually
it's a disappointment when that happens, but not this time).
So last weekend I struggled with figuring out the stitch, and gave up.
Today I looked at online tutorials, with the intention to start over
again tonight. And the light just went on --- click! -- Tunisian crochet
is rather like horizontal stitching, rather than the normal "vertical"
approach! The stitches are formed side-to-side rather than up-and-down. AHA!
It should be easier when I start over later today!
Sue
Reply to
Susan Hartman
Think of the stitch like an attached chain stitch. Stick needle in stitch and pull up a loop. Hold loop on needle and repeat pull up a stitch and hold on needle in next stitch.
When all the stitches are on the needle proceed to put yarn over needle and pull through first stitch, then second stitch and on and on.
I'm not sure my rather simple explanation will help, but I'm certain you will get comfortable with it after a couple of tries.
Enjoy!
Lucille
Reply to
Lucille
I have a photo and text tutorial which includes how to cross stitch on the ground. If that's of interest, it's here:
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might also enjoy another page, which includes a baby afghan of my design.
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wish it would make a huge comeback and that loads of designers would get involved as they did in the 50s, 60s, and 70s. Such gorgeous stuff. And for those who love cross stitch, another medium on which to make their crosses.
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
If you need any assistance, just holler and perhaps we can schedule some sort of fun VA/MD event in the near future, complete with tutorial ;-) I like tunisian crochet, though it's hard on my wrist.
Best wishes, Ericka
Reply to
Ericka Kammerer
As one side looks a bit like `woven , and the other like Purl knitting , one can play with this and make patterns , one can make every wanted shape ,, It does EAT up more wool that other knitting techniques ,, you can get wonder effects by changing colors mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
I found a Tunisian crochet hook after seeing the same show! We all should get together and "play" and learn from each other on this one.
Donna in Virginia
Reply to
Donna
Yes, it gets *very* heavy! I did an afghan for DSis a number of years ago, a Mary Maxim pattern with a Soutwestern design, and that thing weighs a *ton*! But she loves it and is still using it. :)
Joan
Reply to
Joan E.
Two things to keep in mind: keep the hook in front of the work as you go across. Don't raise the loops above the previous row. This will give you nice "squares" to work with.
Yes, these afghans can weigh a lot. My baby carriage blanket is light as a feather. I used Dalgren's baby wool and it's like a feather. I'm surprised more weren't designed in lighter-weight wools. Most of the Mary Maxim and Spinnerin afghans in their day - that I know about - were done in worsted weight. My mother did a beauty. Of course, with lighter weight yarns, you're going to have lots more stitches to get the same size.
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
I did one years ago in sport weight yarn that measures about 54" x 60" without the fringe and it too weighs a ton. Using a featherweight wool in a baby blanket size would make it significantly lighter, but is that big enough to call it an afghan?

Reply to
Lucille
Thanks for all the links and encouragement. I experimented last night, and did almost a foot of very passable Tunisian crochet - using just a regular hook, worsted weight, and rows of 15 stitches (it'll probably turn into a child's scarf, or a long narrow adult scarf, depending on how far the yarn takes me!).
I can see how it will get tiring on the hands/wrists. I'm feeling a little stiff today, and I'm sure it was because I was tense in holding the hook and figuring it all out - although I don't think the tension shows in the stitching, so that's good.
I have a queen-size afghan my grandmother did in afghan sitch and cross-stitched with flowers. It's too hot and heavy for me to use on our bed, but perfect for a guest room that isn't as warm as the rest of the house! I think using lighter weight yarns for baby blankets is a good idea. Maybe I'll get to that someday.
Sue
Reply to
Susan Hartman
Years ago, all manner of items were done up in Tunisian (afghan or trico) crochet. Housecoats, sweater jackets, and baby slippers. The latter I had on my website for a very long time. Similar to Mary Jane shoes. As I said, I hope it comes back. There is a dearth of decent designs.
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
Nah. It's a carriage blanket. Called that because it is the same size as the original which was worked by my great aunt for my birth which had large roses on it in rayon threads. My family called it a carriage blanket, and since carriages were around when I was born, that probably is an apt name. It would cover a baby in a crib or lying on a couch, or showing off for church. :~)
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
That is "baby carriage", as in English style pram (which word itself is short for "perambulator". I still have some Brit patterns from years ago, in which this was also referred to as a pram cover or pram blanket.
Olwyn Mary in New Orleans
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Reply to
Olwyn Mary
When i didn`t find my tunisian crochet hook , i used a bamboo circular , i carved one side into a hook and worked this way ,,, mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
Diane , Sorry could you elaborate on this advice
It rather puzzeled me , and i have crocheted `quite` some items, in various Tunisian crochet projects ,,, the loops that one takes either from the `straight` lines or the upper laying `chain` must be above the previous row ,,,,, ???? mirjam >
Reply to
mirjam
That is so tempting Dianne. I really want to try Tunisian but am so busy with every thing else. Cheryl On 5/29/08 1:09 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@mid.individual.net, "Dianne
Reply to
Cheryl Isaak
On the first half (picking up stitches), don't lift the loops up above the previous row. Keep the loops in front of the previous row. When you do the second half, they'll rise up above the previous row. This keeps your finished rows with square spaces.
Try it. I learned this trick from an old book. I always had raised the loops up, which seemed sensible. Then I learned from an old book, and it makes a big difference: squares rather than rectangles on which to cross stitch.
Dianne
Reply to
Dianne Lewandowski
Just my opinion, but I think Tunisian crochet is possibly amongst the top ten boring crochet stitches, even when you do specialty stitches like bobbles and X's.
It does make a nice surface for cross stitch and it's more like a fabric when it's done then most other knits or crochets, but it's just the same thing over and over and over and ------------------.
L
Reply to
Lucille
It's true it's boring, but I really like the finished product--especially for baby blankets so one doesn't have all the little holes to trap little fingers and toes. Plus, of course, it makes a deliciously warm blanket for cold nights.
Best wishes, Ericka
Reply to
Ericka Kammerer

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