OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....

When removing your car key from the ignition at -j40 something C, do not put
it in your mouth, no matter how many parcels you have to pick up.
It sticks to your tongue.
Dawne, who just found this out
Reply to
Dawne Peterson
DAWNE!!!!!! You oughta know better than *that*!!!!! At least it's in a place that will shortly thaw the key out without causing pain. Or did you not wait?
Commiserating in the cold (currently -14F, on our way to -20something), Joan
Reply to
Joan E.
Oh dear. It's supposed to warm up here to -20 C or so tomorrow. Positively balmy. I hope some is left over to go your way. Dora in Calgary
Reply to
bungadora
"Joan E." wrote
DAWNE!!!!!! You oughta know better than *that*!!!!! At least it's in a place that will shortly thaw the key out without causing pain. Or did you not wait?
Joan
yes, the key thawed very quickly in my mouth--but I thought it was very funny! Who would have thought the key would get THAT cold in the ignition during a fairly short drive???? Dawne
Reply to
Dawne Peterson
"Jangchub" >"Joan E." wrote
No, but from your comment I am apparently doomed to live some of it. It is sooooo cold, but at least Joan, andFred, and I have roofs over our heads and light and heat.
Dawne
Reply to
Dawne Peterson
Yes - it's definitely something to be grateful for. I was watching CBC and they were doing a report on the homeless in places like Edmonton and in Vancouver. In some ways it is worse in Vancouver, because they are just not prepared for the extreme cold temps.
It was 8C here yesterday, and it is -4C today so we are relatively well off. I went for a walk to the post office, and to pick up the paper, and really enjoyed the briskness.
MargW
Reply to
MargW
See? That's what's great about living in the north....we *know* how to insulate! Against both cold *and* heat! :)
Joan
Reply to
Joan E.
Whine, whine, whine... try living somewhere with real weather with no insulation in the walls.
Elizabeth - from her unheated, uninsulated, third floor.
Reply to
epc123
Contrary to what you seem to think, houses built a hundred years ago in the East weren't insulated either.
Reply to
epc123
On 12/19/08 2:43 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@n21g2000vba.googlegroups.com,
You haven't add the insulation up there yet girl! good thing there are no pipes there
Reply to
Cheryl Isaak
On 12/19/08 2:45 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@n21g2000vba.googlegroups.com,
Some were in a sense, with largish (6 to 8 inch) air pockets. Just not most homes. And it did depend on where you were. My grandmother spent many moons researching home building practices while on the local (Millis MA) historical society. Many it was the better off families that built the homes with the air pocket insulation. They also used milkweed (kapok) and newspapers.
C
Reply to
Cheryl Isaak
On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 16:22:03 -0500, Cheryl Isaak opined:
Seaweed was the insulation of choice around NS. Unfortunately it dried and dropped down and was not very effective.
Reply to
lucretia borgia
Can't blow in insulation on the third floor the way the roof hits the kneewall. Haven't gutted all the rooms yet, so only some are insulated. Pipes don't seem to care, though, since the first and second floors weren't insulated the first few years we lived here and the pipes (which run up the outside wall of the kitchen) never froze - even when we didn't bother to heat the first floor.
Elizabeth
Reply to
epc123
On Dec 19, 5:20=A0pm, lucretia borgia wrote:
This house has air-pocket construction, but the house I lived in in Ohio was of the same vintage (1880-1890) and the plaster was laid right on the bricks. Burrrrrrrrr!
Elizabeth (not convinced those air-pockets do all that much).
Reply to
epc123
I remember my father explaining to me as a child that they would build a double brick wall with a space between them. That was for insulation purposes. There were some metal tie thingies between the two walls,I remember. Dad was an architect, a chartered surveyor and a civil engineer; he could design anything...but never never ask him to hammer a nail into the wall, or change a fuse. Mum had to do that!
Gillian
Reply to
Gillian Murray
Many houses built here in Ontario -- ie, part of the Great White North where today it's about -22 C with the windchill -- in the mid 1950s weren't insulated, likely because heating oil was relatively inexpensive in those days.
Reply to
flitterbit
On 12/20/08 1:51 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@m15g2000vbp.googlegroups.com,

Maybe it is just that much warmer near the ocean that it doesn't matter.
But I am seriously amazed by that.
C
Reply to
Cheryl Isaak
On 12/20/08 1:53 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@m2g2000vbp.googlegroups.com,
In theory they do. In practice, I'm with you.
C
Reply to
Cheryl Isaak
My 1895 Ohio house was a frame house, with lath and plaster inside but no insulation. Fortunately the millwork around doors and windows was pretty deep, so as we gradually remodeled it, we simply added a layer of half-inch drywall all through the inside. Worked like a charm. Of course, back then the blown-in insulation was very new, not very reliable and had a lot of fumes which we thought would NOT be good for our small children.
Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.
Reply to
Olwyn Mary

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