Ethical question about quilt shows

I was admiring the gorgeous quilt that won the top prizes at this
year's local guild quilt show a few weeks back today. It was made by
one of the owners of the LQS here. I opined that picking the fabrics
must have been really a hoot when she said that she hadn't picked any,
it was a kit.
OK, I understand somebody entering a kitted quilt if they are just
getting started, but ...... this struck me as just a bit unethical.
The show is viewer's choice and the quilt is stunning. It's paper
pieced and the design just seems to glow. But she didn't really make
those fabric choices.
What do you folks think? Am I just being rude and snitty, as my DH
suggests?
Sunny
Reply to
Sunny
I've got a pile of old magazines that I've just been reading, I've read many many articles, so I'm a bit mixed up, but I'm pretty sure one place said that back in the 30s it was entirely normal to enter kit quilts for shows. In the present day, it seemed that it might be ok, but very much depends on the rules for the specific show. If it's a kit, credit must be given to the designer of the quilt and displaying it might break the copyright of the original designer and it should definitely be made clear on a note by the quilt that it was a kit designed by x and made by y. If she didn't fill that in on the application and it's just something she happened to let slip, I agree that would be unethical. Even with the information being clearly stated, I guess that not all viewers would read it or take it in, but I guess that's a risk you take if you enter a show that's entirely viewers choice, there are some traditional designs that can be stunning as well as some that come completely from the makers imagination, a judge should be reading the accompanying info and applying knowledge, you can't expect that of viewers choice and some unusual winners crop up.
Having said all that, even if it's all within the rules, I'd hope for a better example by an LQS owner, in a similar way to how you'd expect a fireman to not have an open fire in the woods, you expect something a little bit more from them, whether that's fair or not!
Cheers Anne
Reply to
Anne Rogers
On one hand, it doesn't seem ethical, esp. if she didn't give credit to whomever *did* choose those fabrics for that particular pattern. On the other hand, the workmanship *is* hers, even if the fabric choices arent. Maybe they should have a separate category for "Quilt Kits"?
Reply to
Sherry
Most of us view kits as nice but a sort of "cheater quilt." I do think it is unfair for the competition who has to pick their own fabrics. I certainly think he/she should admit that it is a kit so the judges can take that into accout.
Reply to
Lenore L
It isn't any different than buying a Thimbleberries quilt pattern and then buying exactly the same Thimbleberries prints as shown in the pattern sample picture. The only advantage would be having the full fabric line or lines the designer used when designing the quilt.
I've seen many BOMs sold as monthly block kits, but they would only be listed as BOMs in a show. Many of those BOM patterns are only sold in kits so there isn't even a chance to choose a set of fabrics yourself unless you want to throw away several hundred dollars worth of kit fabric, do a lot of math to figure actual yardage needed, and buy all new fabric to make the quilt.
I don't think a quilt kit would be easier to sew than following a pattern in a book either. It might be harder since there is a risk of running out of any of the fabrics included in the kit, and if the block pieces are pre-cut there is the added risk of poorly cut pieces to challenge the quilter.
I think as long as the designer was mentioned on the information card, as it should be for any other quilt designer, it should be all right. It isn't like all the quilts at a show are expected to be original patterns by each quilt maker. If that were expected there would be a lot fewer quilts in shows, and probably a lot fewer shows too. Debra in VA See my quilts at
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Reply to
Debra
I think the accompanying info should say, "Made from a kit by XYZ." The maker can get points for her workmanship.
Nann
Reply to
Nann Hilyard
Did the judges know that it came from a kit? I once saw a quilt made from a kit in a show and people were raving about it too. Scads of fabrics and it was lovely. It did win a prize but I didn't see anything on it that said it was from a kit---and I knew that it was because I had bought the same kit then returned it when I knew I just couldn't do that much hand applique !! Mary/VT
snipped: "Sunny"
Reply to
MB
What I think: the rules of each show will vary, so some may permit kit quilts, others not. If you prefer another set of rules, volunteer for the next show committee. Of course the rest of the committee may out vote your suggestions, but at least you would have tried. (BTDT!!) If a committee is required to hang those quilts, perhaps that should be a separate committee. You are not rude, nor snitty ... unless you've blabbed it all over the show and guild, which of course I doubt. I'd have your reaction too!! PAT in VA/USA
Reply to
Pat in Virginia
While Sunny is being snitty, I'll just be uppity. (Ha. My mind zigzags off here to the How the Fight Started and 'which one are you then?'). I simply can not imagine making a quilt where someone else chose the fabric prints and colors and orchestrated the blending thereof. I can't even take a cheater panel for a crib quilt and leave it alone; I always have to make it mine. Even out here in the Swamp where all they sell is barbed wire and hawg feed, it would be impossible for me to accept what someone else put together. So. I reject the notion that a kit would be an unfair advantage. We 'uppity' quilters would think of it as a handicap. Which one are you then? Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther
I think it depends on the rules of the show. Our local show is not a judged show, so rules are probably more lax than in a judged show and I would find a quilt from a kit to be more acceptable. It seems like the "kit-builder" should be given some credit. Of course, you could end up with quite a list of credits: "Pattern designed by A, fabrics selected by B, piecing and/or applique done by C, quilted by D". I'm not a big fan of kits, because I like the challenge of selecting fabrics to make a pattern my own; for me part of the process is making something that is not exactly like someone else's.
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN
It all depends on the rules of the show. Some shows don't allow kits at all. Some allow them, but say that there must be a notation on the entry form. Other shows (including many guild shows) don't care. It's only unethical (which is pretty strong language) if she broke the show rules.
Personally, I don't see much difference between entering a kit quilt and entering a quilt made from a pattern and having a friend choose the fabrics. In both cases, the person entering the quilt didn't design the pattern and didn't choose the fabrics. As long as they aren't taking credit for what they didn't do (in other words, I think patterns, kits, etc should ALWAYS be credited on the little sign hanging on the quilt), where's the problem?
Reply to
Kathy Applebaum
I think you have a valid point. but I also think there are many aspects of quilt shows where this is common practice. I also feel when you send your quilt out to be quilted by someone else they should be given the credit for that part of the quilt. Kits, patterns, quilting are all things that should be taken into consideration when judging.
I have also been to shows that do not use accredited judges. Are the awards valid, accredited or is that just a "matter of opinion" award. :-)
Marsha
Reply to
Meandering
I think it depends on the rules of the show. I don't see anything wrong with using a kit. I agree with Debra that it isn't much different than buying a pattern, and then buying the exact fabrics shown in the pattern. I personally think kits are less expensive than buying the fabrics separately. I nearly always add a little something else. You can take a pattern from any quilt magazine, and most of them tell you exactly what fabric line was used, and which fabrics were used. The quilt guild that I belong to does not have a category for kits. We do ask if the person entering the quilt did the quilting. If not, we want the name of the person who did the quilting. I don't think there is anything unethical about it at all as long as it does not break the rules of the show.
Sherry Starr
Reply to
Sherry Starr
Our guild show doesn't allow kit quilts to be entered for competition. They also don't allow kitted block of the month quilts and such. IF there is room in the show these items may be entered for display only.
Along the same lines they also do not allow whole cloth that are pre-stamped with the quilting design. sigh. (That one I don't understand...... especially with the small ones that are a single stencil. why should it matter if I transfered the design, or someone else did it?? I am doing the quilting-- selecting the backing, batting, thread and finishing. sigh)
I agree with you. And also think that kit quilts should be labeled as such. We all know to acknowledge the designer of the quilt on the label, well, the selection of the fabric is a part of the process that should also be credited. In my opinion anyway.
Pati, in Phx
Reply to
Pati C.
Yes, you are right. The show that I saw the quilt made from a kit was a small show but it was still a treat to see it made up. The shop that sold the kit was 2 hours away from this town so perhaps the judges hadn't known about it...and how could they with so much available today. And would it have made a difference..I don't know. I've noticed that a lot of art quilts today use paint on the surface ..kind of make your own fabric....and I had to get used to that idea which was new to me. Quilting methods.. surface designing..etc., are moving in all directions !
Reply to
MB
Now that could create problems !!! I do remember entering only one show but had to send a picture along w/ the entry form so perhaps they would ...if they had a lot of quilts entered.....deny one..or both entries? I guess I'll never get into judging ...I wouldn't want to be the one making decisions !!...Mary
"Sally Swindells" ...
Reply to
MB
Boy, my sentence after "(BTDT!)" is really confusing ... even I cannot understand it! I THINK I meant to say something along the lines of "If the committee elects or is required to accept kit quilts, perhaps that should be a separate category." Clear as mud?
PAT in VA/USA
Reply to
Pat in Virginia

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