New to me machine!!! And help needed

I 'won' a sewing machine on freecycle!!! I've tried for a couple and have
finally gotten one. It is an older singer (not sure how old yet) and it
apparently needs some work. I don't have it yet. Since it is in a cabinet
and she didn't think it would come apart to fit a car trunk, I have to wait
for DH to pick it up with his truck tomorrow night after work. I did speak
with the owner on the phone a little bit. The lady that currently has it
inherited it from her aunt, and is down sizing to a much smaller home.
Since she doesn't use it, she is getting rid of it. I guess she has tried a
little bit to get it running, but didn't try much. By the way it sounds it
does actually run, just not like it should be. I guess the aunt didn't sew
with it for quite awhile before she inherited it from her, so hopefully it
is just because it needs a good cleaning and some oil after all that time
off - we'll see when it gets here.
Here's where I need the help:
1. Since my machine is one of the newer ones with all the computer stuff, I
don't do anything to it but clean the bobbin area, everything else is done
by the dealer. As a result, I have no idea what I'm doing. Any of you know
of a website that would give me instructions/guidance on giving an older
machine a cleaning and where to oil (exactly where will depend on the model
I know). I just need some rough guidance to get me started. Depending on
how well it runs (if it is salvageable) I'll try to order a book for that
model which should give more specifics on oil locations I would think.
2. Also, since it may need repaired not just cleaned, can any of you
recommend resources (internet, books, etc.) that I could use to learn how to
repair it, and keep it running myself. There is a gentleman I can take it
to and get it running for not much money at all. He's an elderly man who is
good at it but does it because he just likes to keep busy so he doesn't
charge much. He is around 90 though, and I don't know how much longer he is
going to be around or be physically capable of doing repairs and the SM
dealers are so expensive. If I could do it myself, I'd be able to get it
running and keep it running without breaking the bank.
T(so very much )IA for any help you are able to give!!!!
An excited to have a 'new project' -
Charlotte
formatting link

Reply to
Charlotte Hippen
Loading thread data ...
Congratulations! I hope it turns out to be a good machine for you. A general rule for oiling is to oil anything that moves. If the machine has a manual, that will tell where to oil and grease and how to open up the machine to get at the moving parts. Some of the Singer manuals are online; you can order others. I have also found oiling and threading diagrams for some models. There is lots of info at After I bought a Singer 401 (minus a manual) I found a lot of information just by googling Singer and the model number.
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN
Lucky you! In addition to getting hold of a manual, why not ask your sewing machine guru to show you what to do? He might enjoy having an apprentice. Roberta in D
"Charlotte Hippen" schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:f347oi$p54$ snipped-for-privacy@news.netins.net...
Reply to
Roberta Zollner
I know there is a web site for basics on some of the older models, but I'll have to get back to you on that.
E-bay has a guy who sells repair manuals for older Singers. I haven't bought from him, but the books are always listed and he has a really good seller rating. IIRC he also sells copies of some Singer owner's manuals too.
Debra in VA See my quilts at
formatting link
Reply to
Debra
There is a Yahoo Group called Vintage Singers. Great people, several old Singer repairmen. They will help you with almost anything. There are also references and links to manuals and service manuals and where to find when your machine was made.
Betty in WI (hooked on vintage singers)
Reply to
Betty in Wi
Charlotte, I always suggest that a machine that may have been sitting for "years" be serviced by someone who is a pro. It may need to be cleaned and lubricated as well as oiled. There is a difference and it helps to have someone experienced do all of this the first time through. If your elderly man that enjoys working on the machines is amenable then I would suggest you see if you can observe/learn from him what needs doing for your machine. Generally folks like this are very willing to let others who are interested learn along side them. Perhaps you will end up with a bit of a sideline working on other people's machines when this gentleman no longer can!! (A good way to make "stash cash". ) I would love to find someone like that around here to learn some of this from. I have worked on some machines. And basically my attitude was that if there was an easily accessible screw, it was meant to be unscrewed. If there was yucky, yellow/brown, dried lubricant it needed to be cleaned off and fresh lubricant applied. Any where else that metal moved against metal, or ?? it needed some oil. Be careful of what look like dirty, oily scraps of felt "caught" in some places. It may be there to help with the oiling of that area. Alcohol and non-shredding cotton swabs, especially the ones made for cleaning computers with a long "stick" are your friends. If you can, take a picture before you take anything apart, and at any critical points, to help you put it back together again. There should not be any "left over" parts when you finish putting it back together. Working on a piece of carpet or felt helps keep things from rolling off the table, as well as cushioning the machine.
Good luck, Have fun, Pati, in Phx
Reply to
Pati Cook
DH and I aren't exactly 'in love' with the local SM guy - he's the one that handles my Bernina. The older gentleman that does it to keep busy is not very local. My other machine when to my parent's house first then they took it to him for me. We'll have to see what the schedule looks like in the next couple of weeks to see if I'm able to take it there myself. I'd like to meet the guy at the least.
Reply to
Charlotte Hippen
I didn't think about a repair manual specific for the machine. I'll have to see what I find online once I know what it is I've gotten. Thanks Debra!!!
Reply to
Charlotte Hippen
Didn't know there was a difference. Maybe I'd better let a pro do it.
I've never met the man, only dealt with him thru my parents as go between. However, he does sound like a really great guy and I'm sure he wouldn't mind. Only problem is his location. He is 'back home' so that is why my parents act as the go between. I get the machine to them when they are here or we are there and they take it to him. We'll see what I'm dealing with and what the schedule is looking like maybe I'll have to take a mini vacation at the parents' place so I can have him show me.
Thanks for all the tips, Pati. I appreicate it!!! -- Charlotte
formatting link

Reply to
Charlotte Hippen
Congratulations on your find!=20
Hopefully you will get a manual with your machine - that is the best 'tool' you can have for it! The manual will provide cleaning and oiling directions. If you don't have a manual there might be freebies on line depending on what model it is.
I'm assuming it has a motor, so one of the first things you should check is the power cords. If there are any worn spots or fraying, or if the motor sounds funny when you go to plug it in, stop and get the cords replaced.
If it is a simple machine it won't need much to keep it going :) =20
While your machine isn't a treadle, the TREADLEON site has great suggestions for cleaning and maintainig machines.
formatting link
This should be a good start until we know what model it is :)
-Irene
------------- "You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." - Mae West
Reply to
IMS
Thanks Irene. DH surprised me by picking it up yesterday. It is a 15-91 with the instructions book and everything is in great condition. Right now DH and I are thinking that we will have it done by a 'pro' this first time, then after that, we don't we see why we can't keep it clean, oiled and greased using the book. Other than that it shouldn't need much.
Reply to
Charlotte Hippen
Super find, Charlotte. Yep, once the pro goes over it won't need much else. You will LOVE it...they are super for free motion quilting. They have a large harp space and the feed dogs drop!
-Irene
------------- "You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." - Mae West
Reply to
IMS

Site Timeline Threads

InspirePoint website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.