OT sort of but sewing question rugs

OK, about a year ago, maybe longer I bought a woollen floor rug at a
charity sale. The edge binding is worn in places, so needs covering.
Today I found bargain bias binding for 60 cts for 5 metres instead of 2
euros, so have bought loads! OK, what I thought was, if I use this to
re-bind the edge I could use it double thickness, to give it a bit of
strength.
How would you do this? Would you
(a) sew 2 thicknesses on at the same time or
(b) go around twice? It is 3 yds x 2 yds.
I think probably (a), but when I come to join in a new length of bias,
would it be better that I have one joining seam that goes through both
layers or join each layer separately and smooth down.
It is a lovely rug and there was no way that I could afford to buy a new
one, so make do and mend. We have parquet floors which are lovely in the
summer, but a bit cool in the winter.
Also, does anyone know of anyone that still makes or sells linoleum mats
to go in front of fireplaces? Ours is ancient, but real linoleum, not
plastic, so is naturally fireproof so if any sparks fall out we
shouldn't be in trouble.
Thanks
Janner
France
Reply to
Janner
Interesting question! I think I would use method (a)mainly so that you could avoid having two seams on top of one another. Also, I guess that there might be less friction (so, wear) if the two layers were sewn on together - less possible meovement? When you come to join in the new binding, sew the pieces together before you apply any to the rug. You know the measurements, so it is easily possible. I honestly don't know - have never done anything like this, just thinking in my kind of logic >g<
Pat on the Green
In article , snipped-for-privacy@removethisbit.gmail.com says...
Reply to
Patricia Storey
"Janner" < wrote in message >
Think maybe you might find a fireplace screen to go in front of the fireplace to prevent sparks from flying onto you floor? Over here I sometimes see them at a thrift store or a yard sale? Sometimes the household catalogs will have the linoleum to go on the floor in front of the fireplace. That's all I can think of. Maybe they would be at a farm type store? Good luck with both projects. Barbara in SC
Reply to
Bobbie Sews More
I would think to join ends as for a quilt binding, and then stagger the joins, before sewing them down at the same time. I might even consider fusing the layers together before sewing them down.
So far as the linoleum, I looked around the last time we had to replace the vinyl junk our landlord puts down. The guy at the flooring store said he could get some from a Dutch company called Forbo, but it would cost the earth. He suggested I think about asphalt flooring. This Forbo company might be a starting place for you anyway. Aren't you glad my purse in a bag of holding that I don't clean out nearly often enough? LOL! Me, I would price stone tiles. Granite or marble looks fine in front of a fireplace, and you probably would not need more than half a dozen or so depending on how big your fire place is. Last time I was at the closeout building supplies store, you could get 10, 1 square foot, black granite tiles for US$10. I grant you don't find a price like that every day, but they are not all that much more expensive bought at the regular store, at least that is so here. Sometimes if you go in on the right day you can get thin slabs of nice looking stone at a good price from places that make gravestones. It is scrap for them, and often they will polish it for you for a nominal price. Might be worth looking into if you want to go the stone route.
NightMist

--
I'm raising a developmentally disabled child.  What's your superpower?
Reply to
NightMist
Interesting....I put Forbo into our kitchen (love it by the way) and it was far less expensive than carrying the wood flooring into the kitchen or doing the tile floor the contractor recommended.
marcella
In article ,
Reply to
Marcella Peek

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