The old girl has found a home.

Here is the final working/resting place for my new foundling. It was a
computer table in another life but has been reconfigured to be a
sewing table. Solid oak and rollers on the bottom of the legs. This
allows me to move the machine around and take advantage of the large
surface of the cutting table which is just behind the view of the
picture. That should handle large amounts of fabric being sewn by this
machine, if necessary. It is very stable when sewing. That is
something I was concerned about with the rollers, but they sit in rug
cups and that stabilizes the whole thing, when I am sewing. I really
like this machine, but I may not use it for much except sewing heavy
fabric layers on the bags. I don't like the fact that there are not
really any good 1/4" quilting feet or walking feet that are made to be
used on this machine. Yes, I know that there are some after market
feet, but their quality is less than the original feet provided for
this machine. Mainly because of the narrowness of the feed dogs. The
machine works great with feet that are made expressly for this
machine, but the copies are not good enough for me. So, this is what
you get. Enjoy.
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John
Reply to
John
She looks right at home in that lovely oak, perfect color! No idea what the standard feet look like, but I have my MIL's old 216G, and by chance, the normal foot is exactly 1/4". I do love that machine. Slightly darker tan color than yours. Roberta in D
Reply to
Roberta
Perfect for the old girl. It's neat to see a rescued machine given a proper place of respect.
Sherry
Reply to
Sherry
The standard foot on this machine, "Simanco" is about 1/8" on the right edge side. It is short on that side and longer and wider on the off side. The feed dogs are closer together than on a standard zig zag machine of the same type. Also, there is no engraved line on the needle plate to use as reference. I know you can place tape for reference, but I like the engraved lines better. Also the walking feet that I have seen are for the zig zag width feed dogs. This machine was designed as a clothing construction machine, I guess. I like it for that purpose, as I have gone over to the flat felled seams type of construction rather than the serger type. More work, but nicer and more requiring of skills to accomplish. They didn't even offer a walking foot as far as I know. It was a basic straight stitch machine, and the end the line for that type of machine, as most people embraced the versatility of the zig zag without the use of clumsy mechanical attachments to do any zig zag work. Altogether at this date, just a specialized period relic, that does what it does with style and class. It will handle any straight stitch duties from the lightest to the heaviest, and that is what I needed, so it works for me. That table is the only oak piece in the room, but it does fit when paired with the colors of the machine. I have got to get going on a quilted cover, for the machine today. But first, I have to go outside and blow the leaves away out of the front yard so they can be picked up tomorrow. Sigh! Fall, a well named season. John
Reply to
John
John,
Perhaps there was a "plaid matching" foot made for this machine and other narrow footed Singers. It's worth the hunt. Back in the dark ages, in my home education classes, we had such an animal.
Bonnie, in Middletown, VA
Reply to
Bonnie Patterson
All this talk of 'old girl' and dark ages has me feeling kind of ancient. That machine is very close to my age! Taria
Reply to
Taria
Sometimes this "old girl" feels OLD, but most of the time I don't understand why/how the calendar says that I am 67! My grandma was old at 67 but I don't feel old, how did that happen? And it's my 38 y.o. son who coined the term "dark ages" meaning my time in/at school, he should look at his father, who at 74 is falling apart. I'm not falling apart!
It's just that I remember most of the stuff that I did and learned in school. Our plaid matching foot was/is the same as we now call a walking foot, and all that those school machines did was go forward and backward. The machine that I used at home didn't even go backward, we had to turn the garment around to stitch in the opposite direction.
I'll be away for a few days, going to a quilting retreat/quilt camp this afternoon until late Thursday.
Bonnie, in Middletown, VA
On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 07:27:59 -0700, "Taria" wrote:
Reply to
Bonnie Patterson
Bits of me are threatening to drop off at 54. It's a bugger, innit!
Some of my machines are STILL like that! :D
Do report back. Sounds fun.
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
Yes it is!
I'm back. WE were very busy, no TV or phones (except for personal ones and wifi). There were 20 of us. We had about an equal number of Berninas and Janomes, there was one lone Featherweight and she was running fine but her owner bought a new Bernina at a nearby shop. Our fearless leader bought two more Berninas to add to her collection!
There were a lot of beautiful projects started and/or finished. Most of us turned out at least one charity project. We make small throws for the chemo unit at the local medical center to give to patients (for them to keep) since they get cold during their treatments.
One of our own is in the final stage of pancreatic cancer, it's especially hard on me as she is my friend and next door neighbor. We gave her a special quilt, and make soup for her, I give her flowers now while she can enjoy them. I did the same for my mother, Mum always said that she wanted to see flowers while she was alive to enjoy them.
I got a medallion/center panel quilt 2/3s done, ran into a problem with the final fabric. It will be done as soon as I get some more fabric, don't need much. I did two charity quilt tops and a chicken pin cushion.
We had three meals a day plus snacks, and sewed, talked, etc. some started early and worked until 5 or 6 o'clock, other's started later and sewed late. I know I did about ten hours a day, we called it Mary's sweat shop.
Bonnie, in Middletown, VA, who is resting now.
Reply to
Bonnie Patterson
I thought the Baby Boomer Generation was never supposed to age, or at least that is what they believed. I am a few years older than the official designation of Baby boomer, but I did transit through the 1960's in San Francisco, so I guess I am an honorary member. It is strange when I come up to the mirror in the morning to shave and look at the stranger staring back at me and wonder where I went. I guess everybody has that feeling at one time or another. I think the mind is the best example of aging. If you are still alive upstairs, you can remain forever young. John
Reply to
John

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