seam guide for computerized sewing machines...

I just bought a Brother CS-6000i sewing machine from Wally World and
while surfing the net I came to realize that you CANNOT use a magnetic
seam guide on the computerized sewing machines! Can anyone tell me
where I can get some type of guide for my Brother that is not
magetized?
In the meantime, I have cut me a piece of foam core about 3.5 inches
long and I can tape it to my needle plate with "painter's tape", but I
really would like to find another solution.
Thanks in advance for any assistance you can give me in this matter!
Reply to
ScrapNana22
Most machines these days have various seam guide lines engraved on the stitch plate. If you find you cannot see those clearly enough, try filling the lines with enamel paint or nail varnish in a nice bright colour. Berninas used to have the engraved lines filled with red, which was nice and visible. :)
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
Brother also sells an additional stitch guide foot, that has a ruler on it. It allows you to use the foot rather than the markings on the stitch plate for seaming. You can find it at:
formatting link
Or try your local brother autherized dealer. -ned
Reply to
Nanci E Donacki
Some people use a pad of "post-it" notes, that have the sticky on the back. Putting a pad of them there makes as high a guide as you want, and when it gets dirty, you can tear off the top one.
Check with your mechanic, but I don't think those thin advertising type magnets are strong enough to interfere with your machine. Certainly don't use the heavy powerful seam guide, but ask if using one of those little business card magnets would hurt.
Reply to
Pogonip
Sometimes I use "re-positionable correction tape" -- Post-It tape -- to mark a seam allowance. Not often, because it happens that the right edge of my machine's needle plate is exactly half an inch from the leftmost needle position -- rather odd, when the machine is metric -- and half an inch is the seam allowance I use most often.
For narrower allowances, I guide on the feed dogs and various parts of various feet, and shift the needle positions.
When I'm hand sewing, I use correction tape on the fabric. Since it tends to break loose when the fabric flexes or stretches, I use an inch or less and keep shifting it to mark my way.
If I need to mark fabric for machine sewing, I usually use a water-erasable marker, but I also have an assortment of pencils -- the most-useful pencil isn't an official sewing marker, but one with a "lead" of real calcium-carbonate chalk, the sort that was used on blackboards in the first half of the twentieth century.
(Modern blackboard crayons are not chalk and might stain fabric. Real chalk is a cleaning agent, and quite safe for color-fast plant fibers.)
Joy Beeson
Reply to
Joy Beeson
It is a neat idea, and not my own. I got it from sewists on the TreadleOn email list -- a very creative bunch!
Reply to
Pogonip
You can purchase an adhesive seam guide from either Clotilde.com or from nancysnotions.com. I have one on my serger and my machine. It measures from 3/8" to 3" and is really helpful
Reply to
ksienkowski
You can purchase an adhesive seam guide from either Clotilde.com or from nancysnotions.com. I have one on my serger and my machine. It measures from 3/8" to 3" and is really helpful
Reply to
ksienkowski

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