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Nightgowns

Why are nightgowns so d*@# expensive, anyway??
Are they hard to make? Anyone ever try one??
I like ankle length slick material nightgowns, preferably gathered or eased on a narrow yoke......better hunt up a pattern and try one I guess..........I would love to hear any horror stories or advice.........
Reply to
Pat in Arkansas
I make all my own nightgowns - have done for years. I'm still using the same pattern (slightly modified) it is a simple back and front gathered onto a round yoke. I don't like sleeveless, so I add some 5" lingerie lace or broderie anglaise (sorry - eyelet in this country) all around the bottom edge of the yoke, back, front, shoulders. The reason I make my own is because in this hot, sticky climate I want cool, lightweight cotton - preferably batiste.
Doesn't make them any cheaper but they sure are more comfortable. BTW, if you make a failure, remember, you will only be wearing it in the dark!!!
Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.
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Reply to
Olwyn Mary
A nightgown gathered onto a yoke is the iconic beginner's project. Mom once said that when she was a girl, they didn't even use a pattern -- just cut a yoke out of a strip torn off one side of the fabric, then pleated the remaining fabric onto the yoke.
But slick material isn't easy to handle. If you have any use for a fuzzy nightgown, test your pattern in cotton flannel.
But slicks are usually knits, which won't fit the same as flannel. On the other hand
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is both slick and woven. Comes only in white, though.
Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- needlework
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Reply to
Joy Beeson
In article ,
If your sewing machine handles lingerie fabrics ok, they are very easy. If not, you can use strips of stabilizer or those plastic grocery bags. Awhile back, I bought tricot and other similar fabrics by the bundle from Logan Kits (yes they make kits too:). They also included matching wide laces and insertions and maybe even some elastics IIRC. I've made slips, nighties, panties, camisoles, and lots of other lingerie for myself and friends. I've also done silk cut on the bias, used sheer, 100% cotton batiste and lawn, and sheer cotton jersey (extremely hard to come by).
For nylon tricot, you will need to use 65 or 70 ballpoint needles (not universals) . Kwik Sew probably still has patterns. The Kirsten Martenson book on lingerie is good (has patterns too) and there are others as well including one by Singer. I think Vogue has some lingerie patterns currently. SewSassy also has nice lingerie fabrics.
Have fun!
Phae
--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI,Shakespeare)
Reply to
Phaedrine
I appreciate the wisdom of the flannel suggestion. The best I can do is some woven slick stuff for a first go. Surely I can get used to the pattern on that, and hope that my serger will handle the knit..........I will let you know how it goes..... Thanks to everyone for the links, suggestions, and information. I appreciate it very much...............
Reply to
Pat in Arkansas
G'day Pat
I've been making my own nighties and Pj's for years and years because I couldn't see the value in RTW ones either......they never have enough (read any) seam allowance which usually frays even though it's been done with a serger, albeit huge stitches.
My fabric preference is satin, although I have used a lovely soft cotton a few times, and for winter I use cuddleskin (brushed cotton backing on satin). I use McCall's #5683 which I've been using for many years...this is a unisex shirt style pattern and has PJ's (long and short), nightshirt (long and short) and a kimono (long and short) so you can see it's a versatile pattern and very comfy.
Like you, I used to wear a nightie similar to the one you described, but since making the above pattern once (for a change) I've stuck with it because I find it so comfortable, besides it's quick and easy to make.
Just another suggestion! Bronwyn ;-)
Reply to
HC
Dunno... Haven't worn one for years! I wear Aldi's cheap & cheerful thermal undoes for skiing as pj's: £8 a set, and they keep me warm. I'm too restless a sleepier for nightgowns: they end up and a knot at waist level.
No. Back in the days when I did wear them, they were quite easy. I made several very frilly Victorian efforts when I was going off to boarding school. The nuns thought they were splendid as they covered me from neck to ankles!
Silk would be nice... But I made mine out of cotton lawn I got cheap on a market stall in Lincoln. That would be 35 years ago now. Oooer!
Simplicity has a couple of patterns that fit your description on this page:
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Kwik Sew also have some that might do:
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(nos. 3106, 2703, 2485, and 1812 - click on the NEXT button to see them all).
Hope these help... :)
--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Reply to
Kate Dicey
Doggone if I know.
About as easy as it comes. From good quality nylon tricot, you may be wearing it the next 25 years... I've been known to start beginners on a cotton or cotton flannel nightgown or pjs (the fit is pretty minimal, and mistakes generally don't show in public) -- and I've suggested "fancy" nightgowns or pjs as first projects with slicky fabrics, to good avail.
Possible reading material: Kwik Sew's Beautiful Lingerie book (with patterns!() Jan Bones' Lingerie secrets Karen Morris: Sewing Lingerie that fits Kitty Benton: Easy Guide to Serging Fine Fabrics
Reply to
Kay Lancaster

Pat, I dunno why they are so spendy, but they sure are. And about the only place to find some that aren't 1. very ugly and 2 very badly made out of cheap fabrics is Dillards. I know this because I asked DH for some pretty nightgowns for my birthday. Figured he could handle that. Shoulda known better. We were all over the mall, he told me he was afraid he would pick something bad so I had to go shopping too. lol
I will Ditto what the others have said. They are easy to do. Finding the fabric you want will probably be the biggest challenge.
Email me direct if you need some help. Now that the kiddos are back in school I can always come help pin fit if you need help.
Sharon
--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.
Reply to
Sharon Hays
I agree, they are expensive. But I wear mens extra-large t-shirts to bed.... Have for years; they are soooo comfortable and give me LOTS of room (I'm a size medium in womens) and are cheap! My DD started doing the same a few years ago.
Come winter, I add a pair of flannel drawstring pants (also cheap and comfortable).
-Irene
-------------- You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.=20 --Mae West=20 --------------
Reply to
IMS
> Why are nightgowns so d*@# expensive, anyway?? > > Are they hard to make? Anyone ever try one?? > > I like ankle length slick material nightgowns, preferably gathered or > eased on a narrow yoke......better hunt up a pattern and try one I > guess..........I would love to hear any horror stories or > advice.........
--
   Nightgowns and coats are two categories of clothing which are
relatively expensive to buy, and quite affordable, as well as easy, to
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Reply to
cea
What is RTW? I've seen in a few times. Thought it was round the waist but that doesn't make sense here! I'm sure it will be something really simple.
Reply to
Viviane
Living in the desert, as I do, I avoid any nylon or polyester nightclothes. My favorites are chambray or madras for summer, flannel for winter. Otherwise, the sparks from static electricity keep the the bedroom too bright to sleep comfortably.
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Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Reply to
Pogonip
On Wed, 20 Sep 2006 13:07:01 -0700, Pogonip wrote:
LOL. Let it not be said that the spark has gone out of your relationship. ;-)
Sharon
Reply to
Seeker

Yeah, she's got an electric personality doesn't she??? :)
Sharon
--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.
Reply to
Sharon Hays
Sparkling, even!
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Reply to
Pogonip
Where do you get the madras? I have been looking for an all-cotton plain weave fabric to replace *my* nightgown, of that weight, or maybe a bit heavier. Have searched on-line without great results.
Reply to
cycjec

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