Mineral oil

On Darrell Feltmate's web site he uses a mixture of veg oil and minera
oil. which he dips food safe items in ( please no lectures on foo
safe) Can you tell me what constitutes mineral oil, i assume its no
car oil.
I'm in the process of making a ringed rattle and egg cup for my neice
1st birthday. Hopefully earning a few brownie points with my sis.
Mar
Reply to
Woodborg
(clip) Can you tell me what constitutes mineral oil, i assume its not car oil. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Car oil is not food safe, of course. It is "mineral" oil, since it comes out of the ground, but with lots of additives. What you want is also from the oilfields, but highly purified--available in drug stores, commonly used as a laxative.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
(clip) Can you tell me what constitutes mineral oil, i
Agree with Leo. It is just a HIGHLY purified petroleum product, much in the way vasoline (although certainly not the same) is - specially processed for a specific purpose.
When I made my nephew a baby rattle out of maple I used a warm mineral oil bath and left it in for day, then dried it off and let it sit for a couple of weeks before delivery.
Still looks the way it did (plus some really aggressive chew marks) when I gave to him.
Robert
Reply to
nailshooter41
Of course, since it never cures, it picks up whatever dissolves in the grease of your hands and grabs dust and crud like the "swiffer" rags.
Reply to
George
Its OK, George, really.
At the time he played with his rattle, he crawled around on the floor, played in the dirt, never wiped his own ass, crapped in his pants, and NEVER, EVER washed his hands.
He was also known to manually inspect the family dog's equipment, put any available toy he was playing with in his mouth from time (no matter where it had been), and if left his own devices, turn the garbage over in the kitchen.
And yet... like so many.... he is just fine.
Others I have made the rattles for have had similar experiences.
Robert
Reply to
nailshooter41
Reminds me of long-ago camping trips with my babies. The "ring around the mouth" was a sight to behold. They ate more dirt than food. Thus far they've survived to the ripe old ages of 26 and 30, and are seemingly quite healthy. I don't *think* they eat dirt any more, but I don't ask either :-)
Reply to
Doug Payne
I laughed so hard I nearly fell out of the chair when I read that. My nephew would try out different delicacies when we were picnicing (heaven forbid a truly tasty item like a potato chip would fall into the dirt) and was truly puzzled at all the hubub when he was caught with the "ring around the mouth".
Robert
Reply to
nailshooter41
Woodborg I just go to the grocery store or local pharmace and buy mineral oil. Actually, if I want a lot of it I go to the veterinary horse supply area at the local co-op and get a galon. It is cheaper. If you do not mind the smell, with a bit of perfume added, it is marketed as baby oil. ______ God bless and safe turning Darrell Feltmate Truro, NS, Canada
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Reply to
Darrell Feltmate
Not sure of your question, but if you are speaking of mineral oil, go to Wally world or any other place with an OTC medical section and get USP mineral oil under any of the brand names available. Note that it's not "food safe," because it gives you the runs. It's medicine.
As I indicated earlier it's not a finish, and as a temporary coating it leaves much to be desired, collecting and protecting dirt and sheltering bacteria as it does. Oil which does not cure but does eventually evaporate is pretty much an exercise in feel good rather than finish. What's even stranger than the finish fiction are the folks that use it on cutting boards, where it's quickly emulsified and washed down the drain with detergent, forcing them to "renew" it periodically. Why bother? Of course, a dry board is easier to sanitize, so perhaps it's a good thing to get rid of the oil regularly.
Reply to
George
for sure... I went through a period of using Mineral Oil (baby oil without the added scent) for wet sanding...
I worked well and buffed ok, but NEVER stopped attracting dust and feeling gummy... yuk!
Mac
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Reply to
mac davis
I used to threaten to spray the kids with Endust, since they were crawling around under the furniture any way... the cats, too... Cats work better, they're self-cleaning... My cats get together and remove cobb webs from under the work bench all the time.. *g*
Mac
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Reply to
mac davis
On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 08:15:19 +0100, Woodborg wrote:
WalMart just calls it "Mineral Oil".. in the laxative section, so when you buy 2 or 3 pint bottles they look really sympathetic...
I think it's called liquid parrifin in the UK...
Mac
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Reply to
mac davis
Hey Robert, Hope you are putting aside your cut offs and tools you never use for your nephew. He is a natural born woodturner. Perhaps he was a little too taken up with cleanliness as a baby, but he'll lose that with age. :)
Turn to Safety, Arch Fortiter
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Reply to
Arch
Town Talk Orage Wax
I haven't yet used this myself on something for a child, but it works great on other food stuff items and is non-toxic. I have heard all good things from others that have used it.
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I really love lot sof things this place has to offer...
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`Casper
Reply to
Casper
I was using a mix of 1/2 mineral oil, and 1/2 walnut oil, and then would take a stick of bees wax to it after the oil soaked in. This summer I switched to Mike Mahoney's oil and wax mix, and really like it a lot better than my old mix. robo hippy
Reply to
robo hippy
Might want to think twice about the beeswax, even if highly purified.
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Lots of folks will jump in with the "dangers" of nut oils, but not many will think of this.
Reply to
George
Might want to think twice about the beeswax, even if highly purified. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I don't think there is too much to worry about. The reference refers to a fairly rare toxicity of honey to infants less than one year old. Beeswax in the fibres of a wooden bowl would be injested in microscopic amounts at most. Further, there is nothing to indicate that the bacteria would be present in the wax, or survive in the wax if they ever were present.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Use the stuff you buy at a drugstore. It will say USDA or some such marking to indicate it is safe to ingest. This is the most common oil used on countertops and cutting boards. Dan
Reply to
Dan Bollinger
I bought him a 7 oz hammer (with parental permission), a 16' tape, a big bright orange speed square, some goggles, and a stainless steel mug for his ice water like I drink my coffee from every morning. To top it off I got him a screw driver with a big orange handle and a big pink carpenter's pencil from Owens Corning so he would have stuff to put in his bag. A couple of nails and some screws and he thought he had been doing it for years.
We both had a blast. He got glue all over himself, lots of sawdust, and when we weren't sawing or drilling he wore his goggles on his head like a real pro. He is now sure that we need to build a house together. Not a dog house or bird house, a house.
Gawd. To be six years old is a wonderful thing.
Robert
Reply to
nailshooter41

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