Scored! A bowl!

This weekend, my wife and I went downtown to visit my mother in the
hospital. We got close and realized that we had another 1.5 hr before
she got out of a physical therapy session, so we swung 'round to an
antique mall.
Wondering around, we happened on a booth that was pretty pricey.
Still, they had a nice mahogony bowl for only $25. I picked it up,
looked at the bottom, and lo and behold, it said "Mahogany from
Guatemala - Bob Stocksdale" as big as life.
I almost didn't get it, but my wonderful wife talked me into it.
(Bless her!)
So now, we have an original Bob Stocksdale bowl, to go with the
original John Pierce bowls on the shelves.
Turns out, it's worth way more than $25.
I'll be taking digital pictures some evening this week...
John Pierce
Maker of Fine Wood Chips and Sawdust
PS - I'm back, after an absence of several years...
Reply to
John Pierce
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Hopefully, it's an original of THE Bob Stocksdale. I've seen some turnings marked as being from a famous turner that were obviously not theirs. Are there markings on the bottom with the "name" of the bowl?
- Andrew
Reply to
AHilton
Hopefully, it's an original of THE Bob Stocksdale. ^^^^^^^^^^^^ The form "Mahogany from Guatemala" is characteristic of his markings. This is no proof, but it is a good clue. Incidentally, if it is one of his very early bowls, the foot will be absolutely flat (not concave.)
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Yep. There's characteristics for many of the famous, albeit more clearly in the ones of the earlier to mid 1900's, turners. Although they did change how they did things occasionally and much of it depends on specific types of pieces they created (bowls, spindles, candlesticks, etc.), there are specific and tell-tale signs that can give good clues.
One such clue is the fact that Bob, purportedly, didn't "name" his bowls until just a couple of years before his death. That's why I asked if there were any other markings under there.
This would make a good book if someone could put it all together and get it accurate. Collectors and just plain woodturners alike would find it interesting all of the things that turners do and have done to mark their work (both obvious and completely obscure) I think.
- Andrew
Hopefully, it's an original of THE
Reply to
AHilton
Hopefully, it's an original of THE
Oh, Aye. Dead flat! In further research, I found the same thing. Lacquer finish (also characteristic). So it looks like a real one.
BTW, it's shaped like an inverted, truncated cone. Lay it on its side, and you see the line is absolutely straight: no concavity at all!
John
Reply to
John Pierce
Hopefully, it's an original of THE
Oh, Aye. Dead flat! In further research, I found the same thing. Lacquer finish (also characteristic). So it looks like a real one.
BTW, it's shaped like an inverted, truncated cone. Lay it on its side, and you see the line is absolutely straight: no concavity at all!
John
Reply to
John Pierce
No toher markings: just what I mentioned.
I have the masterede the obscutiy part. My works are actually fairly rare! They would be less so, if I had more time. :-)
John P
Reply to
John Pierce
No toher markings: just what I mentioned.
I have the mastered the obscutiy part. My works are actually fairly rare! They would be less so, if I had more time. :-)
John P
Reply to
John Pierce

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