The $29.95 Angle Drill continued

A while back, I reported that the cheap angle/close quarter drill that
I purchased died as the bearings wore out. Well, one of the guys in our
club asked for it to check it out and see if he could replace the
bearings ( Oh Boy! This gives me something to do in my lunch hour!) Any
way the report came back that the bearings were fine, but that the
plastic case had worn out. I had noticed that the mandril had a lot of
play in it, say + or - almost 1/8 inch. The wear was the reason. He is
going to epoxy it and see if that will work for another short while.
Some of the turners up in Salem (Willamette Valley Woodturners) got
some. 2 out of the three they got had the trigger switch go bad. Has
anyone else out there had any mechanical failures with them?
I did get my money worth of use and abuse out of it, and I will wait
until my other Sioux/Milwaukee drills die before getting another one.
robo hippy
Reply to
robo hippy
mine's still chugging... I'm using it most nights and weekends... I don't do your volume, Reed, but I'm sure it's done close to 100 bowls and worn out 3 or 4 sanding mandrels... Mac
formatting link
formatting link
Reply to
mac davis
Hi Reed
I have commented before on the problem with the milwaukee type drills, in that the bearing ceases up and then the drill is toast more or less, there is a chance that you can epoxy the bearing "exactly centered" back in, but than the real problem is still not addressed, and that is grit getting into the bearing, as that is the mayor cause of bearing ceasing up.
So if you are successful getting the bearing housing repaired, I would recommend that you instal a sealed bearing if you want to keep using that drill.
formatting link
Have fun and take care Leo Van Der Loo
Reply to
l.vanderloo
Well, it just happens that I have a Milwaukee (Sioux) drill apart right now. It would only run in reverse -- the switch would not move.
This is the older model with the push/pull switch on the back. I recently bought a new one -- a factory remanufactured on a web site for about $55.00 delivered. So, if I can get the old one working again, I would have the luxury of having two and if I can't, no big deal.
In this case, the problem is the detent mechanism on the switch. It seems to be ok electrically but you just can't get it to move. It is a bunch of plastic stuff and looks pretty badly thought out to me although I'm not an engineer. In my newer one the switch is now on the top of the housing so I can guess that they had plenty of trouble with the old design.
The bearings and all the other stuff seems to be in pretty good shape, though, as far as I can tell. There is sanding dust in there but nothing to interfere with the operation.
Wish me luck.
Bill
Reply to
Bill Rubenstein
Currently the drill is back together and working in one direction -- forward. Before it was stuck in backward.
The reversing switch is toast -- it is bound up and can't be made to move with the poorly designed paddle thing. I'll price a replacement switch tomorrow.
Bill
Reply to
Bill Rubenstein
I was wondering if somebody was going to ask.
It was
formatting link
They had a lot of 30 or so of them and they went pretty fast. They don't normally have a lot of tools and when you sign up with them you will get lots of email about watches, laptops, and the like. On the other hand, I saved something north of $100.00 so I guess I can read some of their email. I paid $52.95 btw.
Reply to
Bill Rubenstein
I guess I don't see what the attraction is with angle drills. They seem like knuckle busters and have a built in problem with the bearing. I have a Makita 6501 which is a nice light 1/4" drill that I have been very happy with and have used for 500+ bowls with no repairs.
Reply to
Derek & Sara Hartzell
Derek (or Sara?)...
I felt the same way about angle drills until I tried one. I'll never go back. For some reason they are much easier for me to control, especially inside bowls.
Bill
Reply to
Bill Rubenstein
I never used the Makita drills, but have a friend who has one for each grit. With the long 90 degree handle, it works fine for smaller bowls, but on larger, deeper bowls I would think that they (handle) get in the way. I like to work the pad almost flat, and you can keep it flat all the way from the rim to the bottom of a big, deep bowl without any knuckle busting. I never counted how many bowls I can get from one drill, but 500 plus would be a good guess. I put the soft thick pads on the mandrill so that I wear them out ($6 for a 3 inch pad) rather than the mandril ($19 for a 3 inch). I can go through 6 or so soft pads a year. Do you use 2 or three inch pads and discs? This does make a difference on wear and tear. robo hippy
Reply to
robo hippy
It would appear that this is a regular item, though, so it would just take a watchful eye to hit the next one.
Bill
> > >>
formatting link
> > > Thanks Bill. Closed by the time I got there.
Reply to
Bill Rubenstein
I use both... I find that for deep bowls the conventional drill reaches the bottom easier without using extension pads.. also ok for outside of bowls..
the right angle/close quarter is comfortable and balanced for longer use and just feels more natural when sanding inside bowls, as long as the bowl is big enough to get it into.. YMWV Mac
formatting link
formatting link
Reply to
mac davis
Bill the good new is that the drill is running in one direction. the bad news is the old type switches are not longer available. I've been looking for over a year. I even checked with Sioux the original manufacturer of this drill. If you happen to find a source, PLEASE pass it on.
Juergen

Reply to
Juergen
Juergen:
Thanks for the information. I hadn't had a chance to research the availability and price for a replacement part so you've saved me the trouble.
I guess that I could run the wires from the brushes out of the case, remove the switch and speed control (both functions in one plastic thingy) and duplicate the function externally -- a lot of trouble.
Or I could modify the case to take the new control -- also a lot of trouble.
Maybe there should be a tool junk yard where one can buy the parts from toasted tools which have not failed. On the other hand, I think that with this particular tool the chance of that switch having failed is pretty near 100%.
Bill
Reply to
Bill Rubenstein

Site Timeline Threads

InspirePoint website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.