Pumpkin pie!


While jack-o-lantern pumpkins have been around for a few weeks I
finally found a PIE pumpkin at the market today. I dragooned DH to
butcher it for me, nuked it, then ran it through the food processor.
Small boy helped stir up the custard and the season's first fresh
pumpkin pie is in the oven as I type.
Fortunately (or perhaps unfortunately) pumpkin pie is the most
diabetes-friendly sort there is short of no pie at all. Also
(un)fortunately it is my favorite kind of pie.
And I just happen to have a pint of heavy whipping cream in the fridge
*dimple*
+++++++++++++
Reply to the list as I do not publish an email address to USENET.
This practice has cut my spam by more than 95%.
Of course, I did have to abandon a perfectly good email account...
Reply to
Wooly
And if you have any pumpkin left, make pumpkin bread.....mmmmmMMMMM! Made some a couple of weeks ago (our Thanksgiving) and it just vanished. Extra cinnamon, a little nutmeg, sliced and warmed with margarine....better than cake....must make some more soon.
What sort of spices are in your pumpkin pie?
Michelle
Reply to
Eastern Edge
In article ,
What luck. ;-)
But why nuke it first? Scrape off the skin, run the pumpkin flesh through the food processor until it's smooth enough and make the custard with really fresh pumpkin. It comes out very orange that way. I used to run it through a blender in tiny amounts with water added to get it thoroughly pulverized to a pulp, then let it drain before mixing it.
=Tamar
Reply to
Richard Eney
On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 08:35:52 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@radix.net (Richard Eney) spewed forth :
My food processor isn't up to the task. Its a first-generation Cuisinart and built like the proverbial brick outhouse, but when it comes to power the poor thing just ain't got much. I suppose if I chunked the pumpkin into small enough pieces I could run it through the shredder first and then puree it.
Easier to just chunk it up and nuke, then push off the skin. Fewer FP parts to wash up afterwards, too !
I had two pies' worth of puree, so one portion went into the freezer for use in the lean months. The pie itself is also very orange and I didn't overbake it for a change so there's no icky skin on the surface :)
+++++++++++++
Reply to the list as I do not publish an email address to USENET. This practice has cut my spam by more than 95%. Of course, I did have to abandon a perfectly good email account...
Reply to
Wooly
On 21 Oct 2005 17:43:51 -0700, "Eastern Edge" spewed forth :
I would, but I'd want to eat all of it and there are some things I'm discovering I'm better off not eating these days. *sigh*
The usual suspects: ginger, allspice, nutmeg, cinnamon and a little mace. I used heavy cream instead of condensed milk (plenty of the former in the fridge and none of the latter in the pantry) and three eggs instead of two, and only 1/4c of sugar instead of the usual 3/4 or full cup.
Sounds horrible, but its the sugar that'll do me in. I ate two slices last night (none for me today tho!) and my blood glucose barely blipped. What a good deal for me! Pie that I can eat!
OFC: socks on needles. dubblemussa on needles. gansey for me ripped out completely. tuna-dyed wool on one wheel, silk on another wheel, cotton on the charkha. Wrist fusion, here I come!
+++++++++++++
Reply to the list as I do not publish an email address to USENET. This practice has cut my spam by more than 95%. Of course, I did have to abandon a perfectly good email account...
Reply to
Wooly
Yup... I start with a banana nut bread recipe and omit the bananas, nuts and vanilla. Add the same amount of cooked mashed pumpkin (fresh or canned, but be sure the canned is pumpkin only with no added sugar or spice; I found it at the supermarket next to the pumpkin pie filling tins). Adjust the sugar (white and brown) down to about 1/3 cup of dark brown. I added cinnamon and nutmeg because I like them and left out allspice because I don't like that. And then continue on with the banana bread recipe. It is very dark, so watch it doesn't burn; I used too-large pans to avoid a tall loaf so it wouldn't burn the top while the inside cooked. Just cut thicker slices
If you need my mom's banana bread recipe, let me know.
Michelle
Reply to
Eastern Edge
Guilty!! I brought my second loaf of the two-loaf batch to church for a potluck so I wouldn't be tempted. It disappeared fast!
My small boy was more than happy to clean off both the bread and the leftover canned pumpkin (which had nothing but pumpkin listed on the ingredient list).
Not at all; it sounds lovely.
I ate two slices
That's always good :)
What???!!!!
Michelle
Reply to
Eastern Edge
On 22 Oct 2005 08:11:05 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com" spewed forth :
*nod* The ones around here do too - but they aspartame, which my body doesn't like. I'm not partial to vomiting and migraines, which is what aspartame induces in me. I'm experimenting with the baking formulation of Splenda but I'm not always happy with the consistency or texture of the end product.
+++++++++++++
Reply to the list as I do not publish an email address to USENET. This practice has cut my spam by more than 95%. Of course, I did have to abandon a perfectly good email account...
Reply to
Wooly
Would you mind sharing your pumpkin pie recipe, please, Wooly? This is Matthew's favorite kind of pie (I think he gets that from my Dad)... I like it too, but not half as much as he does.
Gemini
Reply to
MRH
Pie crust of choice to line a biggish pie plate.
One pound pumpkin puree 12oz (fluid volume) heavy cream. Use condensed milk if you must but heavy cream makes better custard 3 large eggs 1/4c sugar (use up to a full cup if you aren't allergic to the stuff) cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, mace, ginger to taste
Stir it all up, dump it into the lined pie pan. Bake at 300F for about an hour, or until a toothpick comes out *mostly* clean. [Ed: overbaked custard is the pits. Take the pie out when it slightly underdone and it'll finish cooking from its own heat.]
+++++++++++++
Reply to the list as I do not publish an email address to USENET. This practice has cut my spam by more than 95%. Of course, I did have to abandon a perfectly good email account...
Reply to
Wooly
MRH a écrit dans le message : snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com...
Me too, please. Never had it and wanted to try.I love pumpkin, in soup (with carrots), mashed, sliced and fried in butter but here in this side of the pond we don't usually consider pumpkin as a "sweet". Some years ago my Mom made a kind of pumpkin jam with vanilla pod in it.It was almost transparent and fabulous on hot toasted white bread with a little butter. Afterwards I tried to redo it but couldn't achieve the same result :-( So, in the name of science, I would like to offer myself and be the Guinea Pig of that experiment. The things one does for the benefit of others :-) Sofia D -- "Quand le sage montre la lune, l'idiot regarde le doigt" snipped-for-privacy@belgacom.net --------------------------
Reply to
Magie Noire
Okay, here it is. She never used the nuts, and neither do I, but it's a very good banana bread from a Cream of the West Flour cookbook dated...ummm let's see....oh, not dated. Old though; it was old when Mom used it and she died in 1992. Poor book is falling apart.
Here it is: Preheat to 350 F. Grease 1 loaf pan.
sift: 2 cups flour 1/2 cup granulated sugar 3 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp salt
stir in 1/2 cup nuts (or not)
beat together: 1 egg 3/4 cup milk (I use evaporated) 1/4 cup vegetable oil or melted shortening (I use melted margarine) 1 1/2 cups mashed banana (two or three bananas)
Add liquid to dry and beat for 1/2 minute. Batter will be lumpy. Bake for 65-70 minutes or until toothpick in centre comes out clean.
For pumpkin I'd adjust the sugar down and add some spices. It's very forgiving in that I didn't adjust the liquid to compensate. I think I also added almost 2 cups of pumpkin rather than only 1 1/2.
Michelle
Reply to
Eastern Edge
Thanks, Michelle. I have sent this to myself. You could send the banana bread recipe, too, although I have a wonderful one that uses miracle whip.
Katherine
Katherine
Reply to
Katherine
Oh, you are a wonderful person! A veritable saint! We are so blessed to have you in our midst!l
Katherine
Reply to
Katherine
In article ,
Ah, I forgot to mention that my poor old blender doesn't have a lot of power either. What I did was cut the top off the pumpkin as for a jack o'lantern, scrape out the seeds and strings, and then use a large spoon held close to the tip and just keep on scraping. It takes a long time as each scrape of the spoon tip gets out a thin little stringy bit like a julienne carrot string, but eventually it's done and the very thin pumpkin skin is still whole and can be used for a jack o'lantern. (pie and lantern from the same pumpkin) Then I used no more than a tablespoon of the pumpkin scrapings at a time, with water added, and pureed that in the blender. When a few tablespoons were done, they were removed and put in a bowl and more put in. Again it took time, but for some reason cooking the pumpkin first didn't make it one bit softer in my experience, so, not having a food processor, it was the only way. I did like the bright orange pie, too; cooking it first made it brown.
Then a commercial pie filling company began selling canned pumpkin pie filling - spices anda ll - that tasted exactly the same, so I stopped making my own. Then they stopped selling the pumpkin pie filling! I never did find out why, as they still sell the other kinds of canned pie filling, just not pumpkin. Plain canned pumpkin varied a lot and just wasn't the same.
Maybe microwaving it works better than oven-baking; I didn't have a microwave back then either. Hmm. Maybe I'll try it again this year. I haven't made one in years.
=Tamar
Reply to
Richard Eney

Site Timeline Threads

InspirePoint website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.