White wool or white cotton?

I plan on making a baby blanket that I want to last for many years. I'd
like to have white be the main color, but I wonder if it would yellow.
Would wool or cotton be better for this? Or should I consider a
different color?
BB
Reply to
BB
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On Sun, 20 Aug 2006 23:07:54 GMT, BB spewed forth :
I always vote for wool. Superwash for kid stuff. Try Cascade220 Superwash or one of the Dale Baby Ull offerings.
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Reply to
Wooly
I've got a Dalegarn pattern in mind, so I've been looking at the Dale Baby yarns. So the white yarn wouldn't yellow if it is kept for years?
BB
Reply to
BB
I have made baby blankets out of top-quality acrylics for each of my grandkids. They hold their color, wash and dry with ease and wear like iron.
Olwyn Mary in New Orleans
Reply to
Olwyn Mary
I'm already working on an acrylic blanket and there will probably be more of those for everyday use and for them to do with what they want. I also wanted to make one extra special one that I would hope would be saved and handed down in future years. For that one, I thought a natural fiber might be better. If white wool would turn yellow, then I should think about alternative colors.
BB
Reply to
BB
On Sun, 20 Aug 2006 23:20:05 GMT, BB spewed forth :
I think any bleached white item - regardless of fiber content - will yellow with time. Use a natural (ie unbleached) white or a dyed off-white/ecru instead of white. Then nobody will notice ;D
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Reply to
Wooly
Yeah, that was Plan B. The pattern I'm looking at uses the off-white/natural. Here's a link.
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was thinking of making the flower and edging blue. Yeah, the off-white would work. Thanks, Wooly
BB
Reply to
BB
I have a baby blanket (mine as an infant) that is quite old and it is something like a cream color. It seems to be pretty uniform in color and quite nice though not exactly white. Now I can't tell you whether it was all the way white ever but I do know that it is wool. I guess you might say it has "yellowed" but I really think "mellowed" better describes it as it is still quite nice. I suspect that if I keep the beasties away from it it could last for several generations. I do also have a sweater (much younger) that my mother made for me out of acrylic or some such yarn at least 40 years ago and it has yellowed more than the baby blanket and less evenly. (Don't ask me why I still have this item as I don't think I actually have worn it for at least 25 years - maybe longer.)
By the way, I love Dale Baby Ull - it is wonderful to work with. I have made a number of sweaters with it. I haven't made a blanket with it yet but am really tempted by some of their patterns.
Judy
Reply to
JCT
On Sun, 20 Aug 2006 23:07:54 GMT, BB spun a fine yarn
I needed to read through the rest of the thread before answering, as I had a few questions before I threw in my two pence (those questions were answered, IE, is this the everyday blankie, or the heirloom, A: the heirloom)
SO, I agree 100% with Wooly, ecru or offwhite, superwash wool.
(cotton can shrink and get dishcloth like unless its mercerized and SUPER 'cared-for')
JM2C, Noreen
Reply to
YarnWright
Good point, Noreen!
I think my brain conversion from "wool, never" to "nice wool is good" is complete :)
BB
Reply to
BB
And if you're not averse to ordering from Knitpicks, they now have a superwash merino yarn, and I believe it also comes undyed which is a creamy or offwhite color.
sue
Reply to
suzee
Either white wool or white cotton both can last ( and stay white) for hundreds of years. Look at old army uniforms, they were in the mud and used as hard as any kid's blanket, yet there still are lots of samples of old uniforms around, and the whites are still white.
If it is going to be used and not just sit in a display case or closet, then its lasting requires that the yarn be very tightly spun - and very tightly knit- or it will fall apart long before the color changes.
If you are going to knit an heirloom, use something like Bendigo 5-ply. It is a softer wool fiber than some of the British tight spun yarns, but is spun tight enough that it will wear well and many liquids will simply bead, and roll off of it without real soiling.
If you use a modern, soft, "baby" yarn, it will wear out long before the color changes. So do not worry!
Aaron
Reply to
<agres
On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 16:13:38 GMT, spewed forth :
Another convert.
My work is done here :D
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Reply to the list as I do not publish an email address to USENET. This practice has cut my spam by more than 95%. Of course, I did have to abandon a perfectly good email account...
Reply to
Wooly
If you use wool, you have to hope that the intended recipients will care for it well. Think moths.
Reply to
B Vaugha
On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 14:01:35 GMT, BB spun a fine yarn
LOL, NOT to get off on a 'religious' tangent, but "conversion" (YARN, in this case)... is "good for the soul" Running and ducking... Noreen
shoot, that tomato was ROTTEN, yegads!
Reply to
YarnWright
On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 10:46:27 -0400, suzee spun a fine yarn
Adding my two pence to Sue's: YES, they have laceweight AND a DK available undyed! Noreen
Reply to
YarnWright
Thanks for all of the great advice! I'm pretty sure I'm going to go with an off white wool :)
BB
Reply to
BB
On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 23:18:12 GMT, BB spun a fine yarn
A mother in law is like seeds. You don't need 'em, but they come with the 'tomato' :D Noreen
Reply to
YarnWright

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