How binding?

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The one-eared mice quilt is now being bound.  Since we discovered that silk
thread could be discombobulated by some laundry products I decided maybe I'd
better use something else.  I don't know where the mice are going and can't
hope for gentle treatment on wash day.  Decided to use plain old Coats &
Clark.
    A submerge through Thread Heaven has made it perfectly agreeable.  Using
tiny wood clothespins to pin the binding in place has kept my skin from
being turned into a bloody sieve.
    The newest trick?  Ah.  Sneaky.  The binding is Hoffman's Spectrum.  Red
was called for but Spectrum is a wild whirl of red, magenta, and purple.
Either my stitches are perfect - or the binding is so busy that you can't
see them.
    Equally important is surviving.  I've put my chair high, low - added a
pillow at my back, taken breaks and remembered to do the 'Yes, No, and
Whatever' exercises.
    Any other suggestions on how to survive binding?  Polly



Re: How binding?
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A good movie (or a few, depending on size of quilt to be bound and
speed of sewing). Also a cupfull og your favourite variety of MMs (to
eat straight from the cup, no greasy fingers ever).

Hanne in CPH

Re: How binding?
Well, not quite, but I did think of you when making these quilts!
The incubator covers that I am (gradually) making for a (fairly) nearby
neo-natal unit are made to the hospital's request - as to shape.  They
gave me the overall sizes and then said that they would prefer that the
ends were ovals!.  So, I cut a 15" radius quadrant off each corner -
that makes for brilliantly easy binding!
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: How binding?
This doesn't have to do with comfort, and since you've already started the
binding, it won't help you this time, but . . .

I always start stitching my binding to the back about 6 to 10 inches in from
a corner. That way, when you turn that last corner, you're almost done. I
know, I know  - I haven't saved any time or made the job easier - it's just
a mind trick that makes me feel better!
--
Louise in Iowa
nieland1390@mchsi dot com
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Re: How binding?
Louise in Iowa wrote:
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I do a similar thing - but start near a corner since that's what I hate
doing the most.  Somehow I like the rhythm of sewing down a straight
stretch and I prefer to end off with that. Funny, it's the only bit of
hand sewing that I do on a quilt.

Another thing that helps is to use hair clips to hold the binding in
place instead of pins.  You can get inexpensive packs of them at the
dollar store. Saves pricking your hands :)

Allison

Re: How binding?
When I have sewn the binding to the front, I always do the turning of
the corners to the back first - as 'done islands'!  Then you just have
four straight stretches to do.  Another mind trick I suppose >g<
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: How binding?
Polly Esther wrote:

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   I do mine on the machine which is total heresy for most quilters here
:-).  Sorry, but it's quick and easy and I don't care if it doesn't last
50 years!  I make my own binding so if I want to double the fabric, I
can.  I cut it, fold & press it twice, fold it over the edge of the
quilt and sew it down -- front AND back in one fell swoop with a
decorative stitch which catches both front and back edges in one pass!!
  I even get a mitered look to my corners, so there -- LOLOL!  CiaoMeow
 >^;;^<

PAX, Tia Mary >^;;^<   (RCTQ Queen of Kitties)
Angels can't show their wings on earth but nothing was ever said about
their whiskers!
Visit my Photo albums at  http://community.webshots.com/user/tiamary

Re: How binding?
Howdy!

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Another myth; many, many quilters attach binding by machine.  Like
handquilting, those who don't use the machine are becoming more rare. <G>

As to bias binding being more flat or looking better, I'd put my straight
binding up against any professional bias, anytime.  <VBG>

Cheers!
R/Sandy

On 5/28/09 7:06 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@mid.individual.net, "Tia

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Re: How binding?
Hi Sandy, I also use binding that I cut on the straight of grain.  Sometimes
I cut on the cross grain because it has a little stretch, and when I need
something with more stretch than that, I still don't cut on a true bias.
Barbara in SC



Re: How binding?
Sandy Ellison wrote:

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   Au Contraire Sandy -- whenever I have posted about putting my binding
on by machine, most responses have been "WHAT??"   That's when I even
get a response which happens very rarely.  HMMM, I wonder if it might be
doing it in one pass that gets folks flummoxed??  Works a treat and
really is quick, easy and very pretty what with using a decorative
stitch and all :-).  CiaoMeow >^;;^<

PAX, Tia Mary >^;;^<   (RCTQ Queen of Kitties)
Angels can't show their wings on earth but nothing was ever said about
their whiskers!
Visit my Photo albums at  http://community.webshots.com/user/tiamary

Re: How binding?
Howdy!

  Mary, I say we take up the cause and declare it
 OKAY to apply binding by machine.  <g>

While I admit to sewing it by both machine and hand (I machine to the
front side for a nice, clean line, then hand-sew on the back where a
few stitches might show), I reckon whatever gets the job done is good,
as Finished is my favorite kind of quilt.  ;-D
So, if *we* say it's Okay, then it is.  That's our ruling.
"Because I'm older & I have more insurance."  (Fried Green 'Maters)

Cheers!
R/Sandy - glad to be talking quilty stuff 8->


On 5/28/09 9:34 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@mid.individual.net, "Tia

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Re: How binding?
Sandy Ellison wrote:
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     Well, I ran the whole idea by the Quilt Police the first time I
thought of doing it and they just looked down their noses at me so I
sorta figured it'ud be OK :-).  Of course, most of the dyed in the wool
southern quilt ladies I know down here in Magnoliaville (AKA Atlanta)
are still suffering from the vapours because of it.  I'm still doing it
so that just goes to show how much the whole things bothers me -- LOLOL!
    Now, as for doing it this way -- t's not really my idea.  I saw
someone on Simply Quilts who demonstrated it once -- maybe one of the
Quilt in a Day people.  She showed how to make the binding and then get
lovely mitered corners, all on the machine in ONE pass.  She started and
stopped on a corner and I didn't like the look of it so I worked out a
way to start and end in the middle of one side AND have a bias seam,
too! You have to stop and cut your thread at each corner but that's
worth it to have the whole thing done in one pass!!  CiaoMeow >^;;^<

PAX, Tia Mary >^;;^<   (RCTQ Queen of Kitties)
Angels can't show their wings on earth but nothing was ever said about
their whiskers!
Visit my Photo albums at  http://community.webshots.com/user/tiamary

Re: How binding?
Hi Polly!  When I am binding a quilt I break it up into different steps like
you probably do.  I do the hard stuff first to get it done with, like zig
zagging the edges and maybe doing some pinning with the binding.  Then I
put it aside for a few hours while I do the fun housework, like mopping the
kitchen.  Then finishing the binding is easy!  Is this the kind of stuff you
wanted to know?
Barbara in rainy SC



Re: How binding?
I just thought this was a good time to haul out every trick in the book,
Barbara.  Nobody's mentioned where to put the quilt while binding it.
Usually, I let most of the weight of a quilt be supported on a table in
front of me.  Last night I sort of piled it in a chair on my left.  That
worked well.  The quilt is, of course, heavy and warm.  It might be helpful
to have a queen-sized lap.  Polly


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Re: How binding?
If it is a baby sized quilt, try doing all the pinning at the outset,
so when you get motivated to sew the binding down, you are good to go,
no stopping. I usually use a table in frnt of me also, but this past
weekend tried something different. I took the baby quilt I was doing
to my crochet/knitting group meetup. Sewed down three sides while
there, and it went slick-as-pig's-snot, talking and visiting, not
focusing on how much further there was to go. What a pleasant
surprise.

The quilt was delivered yesterday.

Ginger in CA


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Re: How binding?
I have always enjoyed the hand work of stitching a binding by hand but
with all these charity quilts I am making this year I have forced
myself to do the majority of the work by machine. If there is enough
fabric (remember I am trying to use my stash for these quilts) I make
a double binding (sometimes called a French binding). First, I sew it
to the back. Second, I wrap the binding to the front, form the corners
and hand stitch about two inches on both sides of the corners. Now it
is easier to machine stitch the binding in place. I stitch all the way
around, stitching over the hand stitched areas. The blanket stitch
looks nicer but a small zig zag is quicker so that is the way I go.
Since I don't like the invisible thread I have had to purchase a few
spools of thread to match certain fabrics.

As for the queen size lap maybe that is why I don't have a problem
stitching binding by hand. If I am sitting in the recliner with my
feet up the quilt fits nicely over my lap. Guess there are advantages
to a little extra size.

Susan
    
On Wed, 27 May 2009 23:21:49 -0500, "Polly Esther"

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Re: How binding?
Susan, I don't put a binding on most of the charity quilts I make; not that
I am a member of the any old trash is 'good enough' for charity.  I usually
birth those quilts.  I put a scallop stitch or the one that sort of looks
like ric-rac at the edges once they're turned, pinned square and straight.
It saves lots of time, is neat-looking and I believe it's sturdy. The
Ultimate Test here is Yogi's quilts.  He's right piggy about muddy feet and
his quilts survive constant washing. Polly


"Susan Laity Price" <wrote>I have always enjoyed the hand work of stitching
a binding by hand but
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Re: How binding?

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Polly, I usually enjoy doing the binding -- strange, aren't I? But I
find it therapeutic in terms of "bonding" while I bind. <G> I love to
use Elmer's glue to replace the pinning (and getting stabbed), as Sharon
Schamber shows in her YouTube video, and I turn on a good movie or
listen to podcasts on my iPod. It's rather like having a last good fling
with a friend before sending it out into the world. :)

--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sw.foster1 (at) gmail (dot) com (remove/change the obvious)
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: How binding?
Bribe a friend to help.
Sometimes I decide the binding would look just fine machine-stitched.
Then I hand-sew the corner miters, and the rest is easy!
Roberta in D

On Wed, 27 May 2009 23:21:49 -0500, "Polly Esther"

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Re: How binding?
I have done bindings a lot of different ways. <VBG>
When I was doing samples, of pre-quilted crib panels,  for House of
Fabrics, I usually used ready to use binding (Wrights). Or I used
premade ruffled binding. It went on in one go, usually with a
decorative stitch (and I rounded the corners of the quilts so I didn't
have to miter them. Needed to be fast.)
Most of the time I use a double, "French" binding. Have used it on
clothing for years, all by machine, so sometimes do it all by machine
on quilts too. But I also enjoy the hand sewing part of the binding
second side. <G>
However, I don't pin, or use clips or anything. That seems to just add
to the work.
When I do the machine stitching of the binding (first side) I pin a
start point, with a tail. Quickly check the binding around the quilt
to 1. make sure the binding is long enough. and, 2. be sure that I
don't end up with a binding seam at a corner. (every time I forget to
check it seems that I end up with a seam at the corner. which is a
royal pain to deal with.)
Discovered a long time ago that mitered binding corners are fairly
easy to do, and look great.
Then I hand sew the binding to the back, by turning and holding a bit
at a time. No pins, clips or other. Don't really understand why you
need to. (But that is me.... I understand that others have different
ways they are comfortable with. But I always get stuck with pins. In
most uncomfortable places usually.)

Sometimes I machine the second side down. That is when I will cut the
binding a bit wider, to make sure the back side easily covers the seam
line. If I am really trying to be good I try to remember to put
fusible thread in the bobbin when I sew the binding to the first side.
Then I can press the binding over the seam line , then stitch in the
ditch of the binding seam and catch the back side of the binding
cleanly.  Works very well. Sometimes I just use a decorative stitch
and sew right through the binding. On occasion I have used a blanket
stitch, with the forward stitches almost in the ditch and the
perpendicular into the binding.... can give a great look, especially
if the quilt has blanket stitch applique. <G> Or you want to add a
color to the binding or something.

I have also used glue stick to hold bindings on the back.....usually
because I need to get the quilt up for a class sample and don't have
time to finish it properly, but also to machine stitch the back down
when I forget to put fusible thread in the machine. <G>

As for machine binding being looked down upon..... I have a quilt made
by my great-great-great(?) grandmother. We've dated to the late
1800's, partly because the binding is the backing turned to the front
and machine stitched down. <G> That was one place they could use a
machine and be sure that it showed. Which was a way of demonstrating
that they had a machine to use. <VBG> (the quilt is hand pieced, hand
quilted, but the backing seam and the binding is done by machine.)  So
doing bindings by machine could be considered a "tribute" to our
ancestors. <G>

BTW, I usually use straight grain binding, often lengthwise grain if I
am doing binding the same a borders and cutting borders on lengthwise
grain. Fewer seams that way. The only times I use bias binding is for
curved edges, or decorative use of a stripe/plaid.  And I have started
looking for diagonally striped fabrics to use for bindings, because I
can get the bias stripe look, but use straight grain binding. <G>

As to how, If I am handsewing the binding down, the quilt is usually
in my lap, over my legs. Not a great way to do things here in the
summer. sigh. One reason I tend to do smaller quilts. <VBG>

Any way you do it, have fun,
Pati, in Phx


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