just bought my first pattern ;-)

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I paid =A36.75 for a pattern that has 8 different shirt designs
including 2 for Grandad Shirts
I have found a seamstress on my local market who will make 1 for free
to see how she goes on

I am going to handsew myself a shirt using backstitch
the lady I bought the pattern off told me how to backstitch
I am really looking forward to it
and I can't wait to tell people I made my shirt myself
there is some really good fabric on the local market at =A32.50 per
metre
and I have found some 100% cotton for =A31 per metre for the seamstress
to make
the first Grandad Shirt with

I hope you are all well and enjoying your sewing
when I get one of the shirts made, I will model it and place a picture
at www.trumpet-tv.co.uk

if anyone can give me any tips for handsewing a shirt then please
feel free to advise me of the pitfalls...

Thanks in Advance
Damian


Re: just bought my first pattern ;-)

I paid 6.75 for a pattern that has 8 different shirt designs
including 2 for Grandad Shirts
I have found a seamstress on my local market who will make 1 for free
to see how she goes on

I am going to handsew myself a shirt using backstitch
the lady I bought the pattern off told me how to backstitch
I am really looking forward to it
and I can't wait to tell people I made my shirt myself


Good for you, Damian, something you make yourself is special!  I have
not made a garment by hand (except doll clothes eons ago), but have
been sewing on a machine for some 65 years.  The creative urge is
strong.  Ask here if you have questions as you get along.

Jean M.



Re: just bought my first pattern ;-)
Happy Poor wrote:
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I wouldn't backstitch the whole thing...  Running stitch with a back
stitch every 6-8 stitches was more the norm when hand seaming was
common.  Otherwise it's just too slow!  and the seamline itself is too
bulky.  Also, for shirts, I'd strongly advise using a felled seam for
the body, yoke, and sleeve seams.  It's far stronger than a plain seam,
and self finishing.  Take a look at the seams on my web site, in the
resources section.  Felled seams can be done by hand as well as on
machines: they were hand sewn long before sewing machines were invented!

Cuffs and collars are different.  Plain seams will do just fine there as
they are all enclosed by the finishing.

Get a copy of David Page Coffin's book on shirt making: it's got
everything you'll need in it!  :)  Costs less than a decent shirt, and
will last you a lifetime!

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: just bought my first pattern ;-)
On Fri, 09 Dec 2005 00:20:09 +0000, Kate Dicey

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The pre-machine sewing books say to hem the fell down, but a
simple running stitch doesn't shows on the right side any
more than hemming does, and is much easier to accomplish.
(And my running stitch is more durable than my hemming; I
running-stitch *all* my hems.)  (Well, except the ones I
top-stitch by machine, of course.)  

My favorite felled seam is one inspired by David Coffin's
book:  For half-inch seam allowances, turn one edge a
quarter inch *to the right side* and press or baste it into
place.  (The first time, baste it.)  For experienced
seamsters, getting the edge turned to the *right side* is
the hard part, because we are always and forever turning a
quarter inch to the *wrong side*.  

Now pin the parts right sides together with the raw edges
matching, and sew half an inch from the fold.  

You will take up a quarter inch on one edge, and three
fourths of an inch on the edge that you turned . . . up.
(The right phrase is "turned under", but this was turned the
wrong way . . . )  

This adds up to  the sum of the seam allowances, and the
original seam line will run down the center of the finished
seam.  Sewing the width of the original seam allowance from
the turned-up edge works no matter what the original seam
allowance was, and the width taken up in the seam is
independent of the amount that you turn up, so you can
eyeball this distance in perfect confidence that you won't
mess up the fit.   If the amount that you turn up isn't
exactly half of the seam allowance, the original seam lines
won't run exactly down the middle of the seam, but they will
still lie exactly on top of each other.  

Now press both seam allowances to the side that causes the
folded allowance to cover all raw edges, and sew the folded
edge down.  

Details of pressing skipped.   At least one old book says to
crease the seam with your thumbnail instead of pressing it
-- pressing was a much bigger hassle in those days, and
getting things to lie flat while you stitch them is much
less of a hassle when you are sewing by hand.  Not to
mention that the fabric used for the lessons was unbleached
muslin (which creases easily), and these kids weren't
trusted with scissors, let alone hot irons.  But they were
considered old enough to draft their own patterns!

Note on the "inspired by" -- Coffin's flat-fell seam starts
with 5/8" allowances, and overlaps the raw edges enough to
bring the finished width down to 1/2".  If I recall
correctly (I don't have my own copy of  the book), he also
modifies the seam allowances on the pattern so that the seam
ends up on one side of the seam line (as in the stitch and
trim method) instead of centered over it.
----------------------------

Disappearing markers are just maaahvelous for keeping your
hand-sewing lines straight, and I also get a lot of use out
of a reel of removable correction tape.  I've been using the
same reel for five or ten years, because I use only an inch
per seam, shifting it frequently.  (On a long seam, a second
inch when the first gets too full of lint.)  Long stretches
of removable tape tend to remove themselves prematurely as
the fabric is flopped around.  Also, a very short piece
makes it easy to follow a curve.

Joy Beeson
--
http://home.earthlink.net/~joybeeson/ -- needlework
http://home.earthlink.net/~dbeeson594/ROUGHSEW/ROUGH.HTM
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