Roll out, kneading board - treat with oil?

Today I made repairs to the board I use (a slide out below a drawer) on which I roll out pizzas, knead doughs, etc. After doing this I sanded with progressively finer sandpaper using an orbital sander finishing with 220 grit paper.
Is it customary to treat boards such as this with mineral oil such as a cutting board?
Dan
Reply to
Anonymous

If you oil it, you'll have to wait a while to use it and nothing will be gained. Just leave it alone and flour as needed when used. Oil may be of value to a board used for cutting meats and wet stuff, but not for flour/dough.
Reply to
Ed Pawlowski
:
:> Today I made repairs to the board I use (a slide out below a drawer) on :> which I roll out pizzas, knead doughs, etc. After doing this I sanded :> with progressively finer sandpaper using an orbital sander finishing :> with 220 grit paper. :> :> Is it customary to treat boards such as this with mineral oil such as a :> cutting board? :> :> Dan : :If you oil it, you'll have to wait a while to use it and nothing will be :gained. Just leave it alone and flour as needed when used. Oil may be of :value to a board used for cutting meats and wet stuff, but not for :flour/dough. : Thank you.
Reply to
Anonymous
No, It will get a nasty stale smell as the oil gets old and possibly get tacky. Just sand it. Wipe it down with a damp cloth to remove any sanding dust and give it a final sanding by hand with really fine paper. The damp cloth will remove sanding dust and also raise fine wood fibers. The final sanding by hand will remove the fine wood fibers. I've used this method with furniture refinishing for years. Janet
Reply to
Janet Bostwick
Now if all you use this board for is dough which ( I use a marble slab for ) then I wouldn't oil it. However regular wooden cutting boards I do use a mixture of mineral oil/bee's wax about once a week. Neither food safe mineral oil nor bee's wax will ever go rancid and I clean my cutting boards (all wood) with vinegar/water solution after each use. Using mineral oil only is fine but will weep out over time, while with the bee's wax it will help seal it. Here is the site of the guy I buy my boards from with his instruction.
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Reply to
Joe Cilinceon
I use an oil made from orange peel -- it comes from the US and should be available in any good kitchen shop. It's called John Boos Mystery Oil -- John Boos & o, Effingham IL. States Safe for all Food Preparation Surfaces. And has a lovely natural citric tang. I use it on my rolling pins and surfaces.
Reply to
anthony
:
Why would a sane person do that. Any lubricity ruins the adhesion of a baker's bench... the only treatment needed is bench flour. And never ever sand or steelwool a baker's bench, clean only by scraping with a bench knife.
Reply to
Sheldon

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