Painting on glass

I was researching stained glass and came across a website that talks
about painting on stained glass:
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artist claims that she paints on the glass with ground up glass,and that this technique is a dying artform from the Renaissance. Isthat true? I found some other sites about that talk about this:
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work is undeniably beautiful. Can somebody give me a moreobjective view? What are the advantages of this technique versusother methods of painting used today? She cites Albinas Elskus as hermentor. Who is he?
Reply to
goffperu
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There are several kinds of painting on glass What she is talking about is painting with true enamels which are ground up glass and flux that must be fired at about 1000F to adhere to the glass. (Modern enamel paint is called that because its gloss finish looks like glass enamels) I am not sure it is dying, since you can buy compatible enamels for most kinds of glass from Thompson Enamels. Older than this is staining glass with silver compounds - also requiring firing - which is how the dark details of people's faces were put on colored stained glass windows - produces a yellowish brown shading. Several people paint on glass using ordinary enamel paint that does not require firing, including reverse painting, where the foreground details are painted first and the background last and it is viewed through the glass.
Reply to
Mike Firth
The artist has taken some "artistic liberties" with the facts. There are 10's of 1000's of stained glass painters throughout the world. She named 3 as teachers. Elskus wrote what is considered the best book on glass painting. John Nussbaum among many other things, was the stained glass painter who designed and worked out the mass produced "Glassmasters" window hangings. He is now 83 and just taught a painting glass in Mississippi. And Gene Mallard is a master glass etcher as well as a great painter. The methods she uses requires firing the paint in a kiln. The paint fuses to the surface of the glass. This Is the ONLY permanent form of glass painting.
Reply to
vic
Vic, do you mean: 'Elizabeth has mastered the intricacies of glass painting methods, and is an innovator in this area. Her knowledge of minerology and glass making has enabled her to reproduce colors and textures that have been lost to artists for hundreds of years.'.
I'll bet those Phd ceramic engineers at Ferro and Johnson Matthey are lining up at her door to try and learn those lost secret recipes. "Gold and silver, imagine that!", as they shake their heads in wonder.
I don't usually put down artists who are just doing what they do. but when they call themselves masters and innovators and drop the names of those who truely are masters and innovators, they set themselves up for criticism.
And the mysterious colored enamels that she uses: they're probably not as permanent as the simpler oxide mixtures that her medieval brethren used, and that the 'handful' of modern glass painters routinely use for large scale work.
Reply to
db
Maybe it is interesting to know that in the last century there were some nice books on glasspainting, however they are from 1890 en further on but give details on painting more than the new books on the market now. Try to get them somewhere, they are wunderful to read. Unfortunately they are in German but even then they are worthwhile. Some of the books are: -Handbuch der Glasmalerei by Friedrich Jaennicke 1890 -Die Glasmalerei Technik und Geschichte by Gottfreid heinersdorf 1914 -Handbuch der Glasmalerei Josef Wolfgang Fischer 1914 Publisher: Hiersemann- Leipzig Kind regards Jaro
Reply to
Jaro
They might have them in the Rakow library at Corning. I'll ask next time I get up there and maybe get a chance to look at them. Thanks for the tip Jaro.
Reply to
db

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