Focus on Design: Attic Windows

"Focus on Design" is a once in a while feature that I
post here to open discussion about a specific quilt
block or style. This is not the place to discuss
chocolate, nor kids, nor snow ... though those are okay
in other, off topic, discussions. In this thread, let's
talk about Attic Windows Quilts!
I made a ATQ, a WH actually, a couple months ago. It
was my first ATQ and I must say I want to make more. It
was fun and easy! So, here are some links to generate
your interest!
Here is a straightforward set of instruction:
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About quilting has an interesting variation:
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HGTV site features several ways to make the blocks, as
well as how to do a Y seam:
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,1806,HGTV_3876_31609,00.html
Of course if you want to avoid the Y seam, you can do
it Debbie Kratovil's way:
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(IMO the Y seam is more attractive and is NOT difficult!)
Marcia Hahn has instructions AND pictures of Attic
Window quilts made by several quilters:
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(Take note that some of those quilts in the Cache
included a narrow sashing between the windows, while
others are set together without any sashing. The ATQ
that I just finished includes a narrow coral sashing
and it really add some punch to an other wise muted
color scheme.)
What do you think? Have you made a ATQ, or is one on
your list?
PAT in Virginia
Queen of Everything
Reply to
Pat in Virginia
Here's one I made.
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find the design just a little tricky to finish. As you can tell, I made a window in a window. I'm not sure that was the wisest choice. There are some sashings that better define the windows than the way I did it. The corners are "real" mitered. Not the half square triangle trick.
Reply to
KJ
You're welcome. I always enjoy your topic choices. It's a neat chance to revisit others' quilts and have a theme to study. Thanks!
Reply to
KJ
I have made one quilt that is Attic Windows style. Did it that way because I ran out of background fabric and needed to space the blocks a bit. It does have the sashing, because it is sort of like a "shadow box" more than a "window" I wanted it to look like a set of cubbyholes, and each one has a different "cowboy" boot in it. Some turned one way, some the other.
Had fun making it. And you are right Pat, the mitered seam is not difficult to do, and unless you are really "lucky" with your fabric selection, looks a lot better than using the triangle square for it.
Pati, in Phx
Gentle snipping....
Reply to
Pati Cook
I've made 2.
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and
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I have a panel of the Nativity that I thought I would cut and make into an Attic Windows. A few years ago while in Ohio, a friend bought me a book all on attic windows with various layouts.
Reply to
maryd
I made a wallhanging from Susan Cleveland's "Shadow Box" pattern The photo is before quilting. I used a backing with an autumn leaves print and machine quilted from the back using a fairly heavy, copper-colored metallic thread in the bobbin and following the outline of the leaves in the backing. I did SITD around the windows with clear monofilament thread before doing the quilting from the back, so that most of that quilting was inside the "windows" and in the border.
I thought Susan's pattern was very easy to understand and gave a good explanation of y-seams, partial seams, and mitered borders. I actually made the top in a class taught by Susan, but I'm positive I would not have had any trouble with the pattern if I had not taken the class. Her classes are a lot of fun, though.
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN
Thanks Mary, I didn't know the HST method when I made my quilt. But I was pretty adept at mitered corners by the time I finished that one. I also didn't know about foundation paper piecing when I made it. So I cut each piece out of freezer paper and pieced each block. I'm smarter now!
Reply to
KJ
My Attic Window was one of my very early quilts. I was given some fabric that I didn't want to cut into small pieces. I loved the pattern then, and I love it today. I use the quilt every day that has the slightest 'chill' in it! It's a bit small for a lap quilt; and, sadly, it is soon to be superseded - but it will be kept.
A few days ago, I saw an Attic Window quilt with a difference. It was virtually in rows - each row (from the top) increasing in window size. It looked great, though I prefer the more realistic sizing.
One feature which I think makes this such a great pattern is the visual variation you can achieve, depending on the placement of the two framing strips. You can be indoors, looking out, with the sun high, to one side, to the other side; you can even be outside, looking in; and especially with a night scene that one is lovely.
I dislike the half-square triangle method for the corners, as I think you can always see the seam. And, truly, mitred corners are not difficult to do. Also, as Kathyl said, by the time you have finished your quilt, you will be an expert - a future ahead with mitred borders!
I have no pictures at all, so you will all have to use your imaginations!! . In message , Pat in Virginia writes
Reply to
Patti
I 'cheated' with my Attic Windows setting for the cover of DS's floor cushion, but you can't tell looking at the finished cover. It's here:
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Not a HST visible...
Reply to
melinda
I did this one as a raffle quilt for the Buddy Project - a pet adoption foundation. I wanted to show off the focus fabrics. It seems after looking at others that I might have put my sashings on the wrong side. Does it make a difference?
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Linda PATCHogue, NY
Reply to
WitchyStitcher
m
Have you made a ATQ, or is one on
Yes. Dark blue/black frame, with fussy-cut fabric of all sorts of cats, but no imaginary cats [ie no bright red ones for example.]
For a friend who had been converted to felines lover.
Martha
Reply to
Martha
Beautiful, Melinda. I see what you mean - but I think we might each be referring to a different seam position. Your way - with the seam across the 'glass' square, is certainly great, with your appliqués over it. . In message , melinda writes
Reply to
Patti
That's lovely. There is no 'right or wrong' side for the incoming light, Linda. You can place the side strip up either side. . In message , WitchyStitcher writes >I did this one as a raffle quilt for the Buddy Project - a pet >adoption foundation. I wanted to show off the focus fabrics. It seems >after looking at others that I might have put my sashings on the wrong >side. Does it make a difference? > >
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Reply to
Patti
In article ,
Aha! Another FoD topic! Thanks, Pat -- I really enjoy reading about these when you post one. :)
As for me, I have made only one ATQ (here: ), but I enjoyed making it and might make another one day. I probably didn't choose quite the right colors for my "windows", but fabric choices were limited back then, especially in the small town where I lived. I still like it, though, because of the subject matter. I also like the Y-seam technique better -- I think it looks much nicer, and that's what I used. :)
Reply to
Sandy
In article ,
I don't think it makes a difference, as long as you're consistent. It merely makes it appear that the light is coming from a different angle. :)
Reply to
Sandy
It's such a great way to showcase wonderful fabric, the kind you can't normally bear to cut. I once made the Empress Garden panel into attic windows -remember that advert that was in all the magazines for about a year, maybe 10 years ago? There were 4 rows of windows ranging from square on top down to rectangles about 1 3/4 times as long on the bottom. Y seams? Piece of cake. I am the Duchess of Y seams! Roberta in D
"Pat in Virginia" schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:SJTTh.448292$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe13.lga...
Reply to
Roberta Zollner

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