OT--elimination communication....diaper free living

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this sounds amazing to me but i wish i'd known of it when my kids were
little.
think of all the money you'd save...
no disposables to add to the huuuuuge rubbish landfill.
no excess cleaning products for the waterways or ground to deal with.
do your bit for global warming.
just had an article about a mum here in nz who has used this and it worked
for her wee lad.
he is only 3 months old now and into big boy trainer pants.
nayy, just wish i'd known of it all those yrs ago.
must keep this in mind if any of my kids decide to have babys.
jeanne
Reply to
nzlstar*
Interesting concept but probably only practical for stay at home moms who can invest 100% of their time to cue-watching their baby and making sure a toilet was nearby at all times....as many babysitters, daycare centers, etc are not prepared to do either one....
Personally, and this is just my own opinion, If I ever have grandkids I'd rather spend my time with them playing & taking them places, rather than watching for 'cues' to their toilet needs.....!
-Irene
------------- "You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." - Mae West
Reply to
IMS
I guess I'm old school.... but what I learned about little ones is that they do not have the abililty to "hold it" or to recognize much in advance the need to go. Are there cues that elimination is imminent... I would say "sure". But unless I stop doing everything else and focus clearly on the little one 24/7 -- I would easily miss these cues.
Me... I've always been too busy (at times as a full time employee outside the home.... and at times a full time mom) to focus on watching for these cues. I'd rather play and engage the children (as well as do their laundry and prepare their meals) then spend my time focused on my 8 month olds upcoming elimination. (although my 9 month olds are now in their 20's ... so maybe with grandbabies some day).
My opinion... FWIW.
Reply to
Kate G.
My grandmother, who had 12 children before she had running water, once told me that when babies are "trained" at a very young age, it is usually the mother that is trained not the baby. This sounds a lot like "mother training" to me. I think I would find it easier to change and wash diapers...
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN
Oops! Gee I haven't done this in a long time. I started to write a comment, then decided not to and hit the "send" button instead of the "close" button. I have a friend whose daughter tried something like this for her kids. The friend was so embarrassed when they were out in public with the baby. Her daughter carried around the "blue potty" in her diaper bag and would whip it out whereever they were and the kid would sit on it to potty. I know the next question is...did it work? I think the babies were potty trained about the same time our kids in diapers are. It's a physical maturity as well as a cognitive one...you can't force babies to mature faster. I never did get to see this in action as she doesn't live near me. I just can't imagine watching a baby so closely that you learn the tiniest clues for eliminating. I felt like I already had enough to do!
Reply to
KJ
I had an acquaintance who tried this with her children. She was a very "natural" kind of person. No antibiotics, vaccinations or other sorts of official medicines for her children. She breastfed them until they were four or five and usually had two or three nursing at a time. She believed her children would learn good behavior from natural consequences of their actions. Consequently they were ill-behaved brats with green snot hanging out of their noses most of the time.
BUT .... they were potty trained by the time they could walk. At least she was. The only problem happened when she got distracted by a younger baby and the little one had an accident in his "big boy" pants. Yuck.
I think the method can work for very dedicated mothers. However, I came to believe that it had made this woman's children very unnaturally focused on their eliminations. They talked all the time about body functions, had their hands in their pants all the time. Thought everybody else wanted to talk about, see and otherwise participate in their eliminations.
Personally I think that parents put a huge amount of dedication and decision making into the whole potty training thing. But in the end, it's the child who decides whether to respond or not.
My oldest son realized his poopy diapers smelled bad at the age of 2 years and one month. When I told him that he could use the potty just like Mommy and Daddy and then his poop would just flush away and not smell bad, he was immediately sold. End of story, no moe wet or dirty diapers.
Youngest son had so many ups and downs, poor kid had a rough time. He would just get it down and then would get sick with something and it would set us back. So finally I told him that when he turned 3, the rules said moms couldn't change diapers any more. I put all the supplies down on a bottom shelf and told him that the day after his third birthday he would have to start cleaning up his own diapers. About a week before his birthday he came and asked me if I really meant it, that he would have to be in charge of his own diapers. I assured him I was (and by this time I was ready to live with the consequences of my decision). He looked at me a long minute and then said "Ok, I guess then that I need to use the potty."
End of story. No more diapers. There were a few wet pants when he started kindergarten a couple years later, but that faded when he was reassured and comfortable with school.
I know all about pollution and land fills and carbon and global warming. But the answer to all this can't be constant focus on your baby's elimination needs. There's got to be a better way than saddling moms with yet one more guilt-ridden task. Somebody else can save the world for a change.
Sunny
Reply to
Sunny
As my sister would say most every kid is potty trained before they graduate from high school. I guess at that rate just about every method must work. Thanks for reminding me how I enjoy having adult children. Taria
Reply to
Taria
LOL! Forget Dr. Spock! I like your 'Sunny's Handbook on Child Rearing' better. (It is amazing how many simple things we can complicate! :P ).
chipper ;D
Reply to
Chipper
I must admit that the Pampers (they were the first disposable diapers in Minnesota) came too late for me. I used cloth diapers, diaper pails (remember them?), Dreft & Hilex; when my son was teething and got diaper rash, we let him run about in the sunshine for several hours a day with no clothes (summertime, and doctor's advice). A side benefit to cloth diapers that no one younger than me remembers is that by bending down to the laundry basket and stretching up to hang them on the clothesline, you lost that preggy tummy, and your stretch marks disappeared, much faster than if you tossed disposables into the garbage. Young mommies were much slimmer in my day. But they worked harder.
So much for the "good" old days, LOL!
Reply to
Carolyn McCarty
I knew about this, but I'm not going near it with a barge pole!
I was pretty in tune with when DD was going to do her poos, yet I still let her do them in a diaper, have you any idea how far breastfed baby poo can go when it's been inside for several days? containing it in a potty would be a struggle! having it in a nappy that was changed instantly was messy but dealable with.
I accept this works for some parents, but I do wonder, particularly where there are older children too, is too much attention being paid to one thing?
Anne
Reply to
Anne Rogers
My SIL has used this with her son - I just wonder how she will cope when no 2 arrives. I can't really see that a child can be called potty trained until they can take themselves to the toilet / potty by themselves. I'm going to start with DS2 this summer and see how it goes. DS1 was real easy, and he wore terry squares not disposables.
Sarah
Reply to
Sarah Dixon
I guess there are devotees of all sorts of systems. Me personally, thinks this sounds like waaaay too much work. I bought my disposables in bulk and once did a nappy survey where they provided me with waaaaaaaaaaay more nappies than I (or the kids) needed during the survey period so we had extras. Both were into big girl knickers by age of 3. everyone was happy.
Reply to
Sharon Harper
It does sound like a lot of work. I've looked at various toilet training methods, and tried quite a few out on DS but so far nothing has really worked. He'll be 4 in July...
Reply to
melinda
I had a problem getting ds to poop in the toilet. My pediatrician told me to explain to ds that we are going to put stickers on a calendar for each successful try. I thought....yeah, sure buddy, you don't live at my house. Holy Cow....after that first sticker, there wasn't another problem. There was a promise that after so many stickers, we would go buy a toy. We did. That was the only bribe needed and I don't think we even had to do stickers after that. He was about 3 1/2. It would be worth a try! I was starting to think he wasn't going to be toilet trained until we threatened to take his diaper money out of his gas allowance!!!! (Even my mother who scoffed at me not being able to get him trained had a go at it while dh and I were on a vacation. When we came back, she said..."I don't think he's ready." Ya think??) By the way...he has a July birthday too. He'll be 28!
Reply to
KJ
We lived in San Diego when I had 2 in diapers. I enjoyed getting out of the house and enjoying the sunshine hanging out laundry most days. I still enjoy getting out on cleaning days and hanging laundry. Of course having a fancy new dryer and choosing to hang out laundry is different than no dryer and no choice! Now that you mention it I was pretty slim in those days. Taria
Reply to
Taria
Tried stickers, bribes, etc. for both wee and poo. Sometimes, if he feels like it, he'll take himself off to the toilet for a wee, but most of the time he's not bothered by being in wet underwear or pooey nappy.
Reply to
melinda
Well darn! Our problem was him holding it and becoming quite constipated. Then when it hurts to eliminate, you don't want to do it again, right? All it took was for us to say...let's see did you get a sticker for today yet? And problem solved. You might have to threaten to not give him any money for prom. Good luck....for some it's easy and then there are the others........I've had both.
Reply to
KJ
I know what you are dealing with. With DS#1 we tried a bunch of things then finally just told him he was too big for diapers, showed him we were out and said couldn't buy any more that would be big enough for him and that was enough. With DS#2 we tried everything with no luck and he didn't seem to mind being wet and dirty either. He is 3 1/2 almost 4 too. I could keep him dry by just having him go every couple of hours, but I couldn't get him to do it on his own. I also couldn't get him to poo on the potty no matter what, and I was sick of cleaning dirty underwear as the result. He is now finally (just a couple of weeks ago) totally potty trained. What did it in the end was stickers and bribe. We got a sticker chart and stickers in the mail from one of those kids' bathroom product companies promoting their stuff. We had tried stickers before with out any results. DS saw the chart and thought it was cool, so we tried it anyways, and to my surprise it worked with the help of some little bitty toy snakes for the poo part.
So I guess what I'm saying is maybe you need to try them again, and perhaps even change it just a tad. He may be interested this time because he is a bit older, or maybe it wasn't 'just right' to get him interested before. The chart we got in the mail had stickers for washing hands, drying hands, flushing, and using paper in addition to actually going instead of just one for going. Each one was also a different color on the chart too, making it alittle more fun for him than the black and white thing I drew up even though I had fun stickers for it I guess.
Good Luck. You'll eventually get there!!
Reply to
Charlotte Hippen
:
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: this sounds amazing to me but i wish i'd known of it when my kids were : little. : think of all the money you'd save... : no disposables to add to the huuuuuge rubbish landfill. : no excess cleaning products for the waterways or ground to deal with. : do your bit for global warming.
I never used much for disposables, I used cloth most of the time unless I was going uptown shopping. My three were all potty trained by the time they were 18 months old and it was not really that big of a deal. It was the most challenging with the girl, the boys were a piece of cake. As soon as they were walking well enough they could make the trek to the bathroom I started potty training. I don't think I would have had the time to watch their every move for the sign of a B/M or a pee because I was a young mom with three kids in tow and there was just not enough of me to go around some times. Even now there isn't enough of me to be in three places at once and they are all teenagers!
I wasn't one of the potty trained parents, my kids all told me when it was time to go or headed to the bathroom and started without me. Each kid is different though.
~KK in BC~
Reply to
~KK in BC~

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