What would you do?

Last year we found a niece who had been adopted at birth, and who is now 28 years old. We have been corresponding, and now I want to make her a quilt. This is what she says she likes:
"I am not a flowery type person, I like bold colors like blues, purples, and oranges...polka dots and stripes and kind of modern stuff."
What would you do? What pattern would you use, and what fabric? I, of course, am a flowery type person, and I've never used polka dots or stripes in my quilts, but I'm willing to learn.
Trixie
Reply to
Trixie
You need Yvonne Porcella. She may not be your cup of tea and you might want to simply see if your local library has any of her books. I have 'Magical Four-Patch and Nine-Patch'. Florals are beloved to me too but Porcella can persuade you to wander off the path to dots, stripes and mighty wild things. Her quilts will make you smile. Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther
What about tone on tones? Bold paper pieced stars? OK so I'm into paperpiecing stars at the moment. Another suggestion would be batiks. Good luck. Let us know what you settle on. And congrats on finding your niece. Sounds like it was a good reunion.
Reply to
maryd
Amish style in jewel tones with some mad dots and stripes in some areas?
Traditional style, just suing dots and swirls and stripes rather than flowers?
Reply to
Kate Dicey
Bargello out of batiks.
Or pick a traditional pattern and use all solids but one focus fabric with stripes or dots.
Maybe a Drunkards Path? Or a Monkey wrench?
But I'd opt for more masculine colors and/or avoid pink.
-georg
Reply to
Georg
"Trixie" wrote in news:S6qdnbQqb7sdqXjZnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com:
A jewel box pattern in some strong or bold colors may be just the thing. Here's a picture of one on ebay:
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and a pattern shown with a black or dark background:
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Reply to
Terri
I just finished a quilt top for my expected granddaughter and it's wonderfully bold with nothing flowery about it, yet it has flowers! I made a black and white 'yellow' brick road, with the whitest fabrics in the middle and the darkest towards the outside, and a very dark 3 inch border, and then I wonder undered about 8 different hand dyes and bright multicolored fabrics, cut out large 5 petal daisies, drawn free hand, and put them all around the dark border with a zig zag stitch edge to hold them down. It looks like a cartoon on that black and white background, and satisfies the hippie in me!
Musicmaker
Reply to
Musicmaker
Thanks for the reference. I too need to wander from the path. Our library has one of her books, so I put it on hold.
Kay Ahr in NV
Reply to
Kay Ahr
"Trixie" wrote in news:S6qdnbQqb7sdqXjZnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com:
I would do a Denyse Schmidt. They are relatively easy, particularly as they are all straight lines.
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Reply to
mini Mini
OOh, a perfect excuse for S.E.X.! Go to the fabric store and buy a bunch of the wildest stuff you can find with these colors. Also get a few yards of 2 shades of a focus color, something tone-on-tone like Moda Marbles. Then make attic windows. Simple way to showcase prints. If you have trouble buying these fabrics, get help! I used to give a quilting buddy some cash and send her off to buy me whatever she thought I needed, no strings attached. Nothing like it to break out of your box, and it gives such pleasure to your friends. Roberta in D
"Trixie" schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:S6qdnbQqb7sdqXjZnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com...
Reply to
Roberta Zollner
I was at a quilt store a few weeks ago that had a huge display of assorted dots. I was surprised but then thought of our Frood and her dot swap. They are around if you get to looking. If there are lots of dots there must be some current patterns in the stores that lend themselves to that kind of thing.
I am a floral person too so I see your challenge.
One of my adopted sisters connected with her bio mom a few years ago. (who needs a spare mom?) I got to meet her bio mom this summer. It was nice to meet the special woman that brought my sister into our lives. Taria
Reply to
Taria
In message , Kate Dicey writes
It says Amish to me, too. That was my first reaction. Or alternatively a Jan Mullen-ish style with polka dots and stripes and wonky "blockz".
Reply to
M Rimmer
Such a loaded and fun question. -:). Geometric are always fun and you can get away from the florals using some of the geometric patterns like tumbling blocks as an example. I am sure others here have a vast wealth of examples and experience with the less traditional blocks. A kaleidoscope quilt may also be a thought. julia
Reply to
julia sidebottom
Howdy!
Kaffe Fassett is so inspiring, using those stripes and wild prints and dots and everything together. It's about the color, the fun of the fabric, and "it's your quilt!"
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Another inspiration: Laurel Burch
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Just lots of fun stuff. Pattern? If she's not a quilter, if she doesn't have a specific request, something simple, 9-patches, snowballs, chains, pinwheels; play w/ the fabric more than w/ the pattern.
Good luck! And congrats on finding the neice. My dad's youngest half-sister (same mother) re-discovered her family 5 yrs. ago when she was almost 60 yrs. old. My dad never met her, but I did and she's definitely one of "the girls." ;-)
Ragmop/Sandy
On 8/17/06 10:31 PM, in article S6qdnbQqb7sdqXjZnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com, "Trixie" wrote:
Reply to
Sandy Ellison
I'm really into American Beauties right now. And I'm a flowery person too! I don't know why they appeal to me so much.
Cindy
Reply to
teleflora

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