Need help with skirt style


I have a large piece of slinky in my stash and want to make a skirt.I
can't decide if I want an "A" line or 4 to 6 panel skirt. It's a fairly
heavy fabric beside being very stretchy. I'm thinking the simpler the
better. Any thoughts.
Juno
Reply to
Juno B
If the fabric has a pattern, then I would go with a plain A-line in order to avoid cutting up the pattern, especially across the front. If no pattern, and you want more flare at the bottom than you can manage using an A-line pattern, then a 4-6 gore pattern would work very well.
Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design
Thanks Beverly, I kind of thought that but it always is nice to have someone else give input. The fabric has a rather busy but obvious pattern, so I I think I should go "A" line. Juno
Reply to
Juno B
Thanks Barbara, I had hoped to do it today and the time got away from me. It might have to wait now until I come back home in the middle of September. This traveling back and forth wears me down sometimes. It's been hard to get much done at the cottage this year because we have had so many grandchildren out there. I'd rather play with the kids than do anything else so i really can't complain. Juno
Reply to
Juno B
It seems like most everytime I try to take time to sew, something comes up. Yesterday I worked in my sewing room for 15 minutes when the phone rang and it was my sister, crying. Her husband has been told he has advanced cancer of the prostrate. She talked with me a few minutes, then I went into my "counselor voice" ( I used to work with mentally challenged adults) and talked with her a few minutes more to calm and encourage her. Barbara in SC
Reply to
Bobbie Sews More
Or, alternatively given the stretch factor, there is always the 'one hour skirt' - one seam and a split on an elastic waist.
I noted this idea from the editor of Australian Stitches who inspired SWAP (Sewing With A Plan).
If you're interested you can see how this idea is used here:
formatting link

Reply to
FarmI
You might share this with your sister:
When my DH was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1999, we immediately joined the HMO's prostate cancer support group. We learned a great deal from an absolutely wonderful facilitator. About a year later, the father of one of my younger DD's high school friends received a diagnosis of prostate cancer, and he was told to get his affairs in order, as it was very advanced, blah, blah, blah. We knew and liked him from our shared time at school events. He attended the support group for a while.
Long story short, the friend's father is alive and doing very well, ten years later. They have traveled, enjoyed both their daughters' marriages, and the addition of three grandchildren. Prostate cancer is either very slow growing, or not... and I don't think the doctors are able to accurately predict which patients will survive and/or for how long.
Caution your sister's DH to discuss of end-of-life decisions, of course, but *everyone* needs to do that. You never know which day might be your last on earth.
Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design
There are things doctors never can be sure of and prostrate cancer is one. Years ago prostrate cancer was a death sentence. Now with good early diagnostic tools it's usually picked up early and with treatment the outcomes are good. When my DH was diagnosed I was the one who was more than a little upset. He was almost casual about it. We got a second opinion, which I feel is essential, followed through with surgery, which was the best option for him and his personality, and 6 years later he's fine. As Beverly said End of ife plans should be made. They should be made by everyone no matter what's facing you. The hospital DH had his surgery at, insisted on a living will. Our attorney also insisted on one. We did it and don't have to have that concern any longer. We also appointed a medical power of attorney so we knew all medical decisions can be made by someone we trust if we are unable to do that, no matter what we face in life. Please tell your sister to insist on a second opinion for her husband, get some legal advise for End of Life planning and research prostate cancer. A support group is extremely essential for her to consider.She is fortunate to have you as a support person as well. It's tough but with you to help I know she and her husband will find the strength to get through this. Juno
Reply to
Juno B
I checked out the article and realized I always sew with a plan. I always buy fabric and RTW knowing that I can find things in what I have to go with what I'm making. I have made several 1 seam skirts but thought this particular piece of fabric would do better as something with a bit more shape. I'm also a fan of elastic waist bands. They are simple to do, and are far easier to fit. If I had the shape of a slim young thing then I'd be more apt to do a waist band. I have also been toying with the idea of using rib knit for a waist band but not on this piece of fabric. I think that would be better suited to a lighter weight fabric. Juno
Reply to
Juno B

Site Timeline Threads

  • I have a couple of tops cut out that I hope to begin to get the sewing started....
  • previous in

    Sewing Discussions

InspirePoint website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.