Singer 14SH654 upper looper replacement

After replacing the the upper looper, the thread is not chaining and
it sounds like two parts are rubbing together inside machine
The user manual does not have instructions for setup / calibration.
We've tried a range of settings, but with no luck.
Can anyone please offer advice or provide a link to set-up
instructions for this machine
Thanks!
Reply to
dave
I agree. Looper timing is a matter of fractions of millimetres and usually done these days with an electronic timing device
Reply to
Kate XXXXXX
Not really a task for an untrained person. The advice Wayne and Kate give is very good. That said. here is my $.02 Think of the loopers as knitting needles. The upper looper must pas a close as possible to the lower looper without touching it and the point must pass through the scarf in the looper. It must also pass the needle(s) sufficiently and at the correct height so as to allow the needle threads to be caught in the looper thread.
Now pack it up and bring it to the repair shop.
Reply to
Ron Anderson
If only we could clone Wayne and Ron so that everyone could have a competent local repair shop.
Reply to
Pogonip
I just blasted my Bernette 334ds. This is almost 17 years old. Cost over $850 back then. I decided to just go ahead and purchase little Janome 644D. It was around $300. It is so easy to thread compared to the old Bernette. I can get a great narrow hem easily. I always have struggled before. I decided to get the old serger fixed and it is just under $150. It still is a great machine and maybe I can keep one with dark and one with light thread or just pass it on to a niece. It is a pricey repair but it was only good for parts otherwise. I am still not sure if I did the right thing. I do know that if you do much sewing once you get used to a serger you are hooked! Taria
Reply to
Taria
We've gone from lots of sewing machine stores, selling and repairing, to a small handful of stores that only sell new machines. Even second-hand machines are usually only available in private sales around here. The shops send repairs out to regional centers, which means the machine is gone for weeks, sometimes months. This is a really good reason why serious stitchers need more than one machine on hand.
Reply to
Pogonip
I love my 644D. You got it for a very good price. Mine was at least $100 more but then I got lots of goodies with it, coupons for a lot of free fabric, patterns and notions, as well as 10% off when I shop in the store I bought it at. Juno
Reply to
Juno
"Stitchers" (Non-gender-specific term for people who join pieces of fabric together and do other assorted sewing tasks)...Hmmm...
"Sewers" (A system for removing waste)...Hmmm...
Since many here don't seem to like "Sewists" (my preferred term), I think I'll start using "Stitchers". ;-)
Thanks!
Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design
Good advice!
Ron, while you're here, do you by any chance, have the narrow-rolled-hem needle plate and foot for a Bernette MO 2-3-4 serger? Mine somehow wandered off while I was doing DD's wedding sewing a couple of years back. I have another machine I can use, but I like to have all the attachments for my machines before I give them away or eBay them.
Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design
Ah, "sewists" is good. I'll admit, "sewers" always gives me that little bump off the narrative moment, then I correct my mental image. Seamers is too limited, we'd need seamers, darters, basters, finishers, menders, darners, etc. which is too cumbersome. I think I have a mental picture of us all being stitchers of one sort or another, so it popped out, so to speak.
Seamstress and tailor are too specific for these terms.
Reply to
Pogonip
"Pogonip" wrote in message
:-)) I'm unreconstructed. I find 'sewist' a bit too artificial - like saying 'actor' for 'actress'.
I'll admit, "sewers" always gives me that little
I still use 'sewers' as I know what I'm talking about and I never mix my drains with my fabric and threads :-)) But I like Stitchers. Must remember to use it more often.
Reply to
FarmI
I prefer "sewists". "Stitchers" has been very heavily adopted by the cross-stitch crowd, and they might not like us taking what they consider to be their term.
Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.
Reply to
Olwyn Mary
Exactly, both are too gender-specific, at least in common usage. I still like "sewist", but I can be persuaded to use "stitcher".
I don't think either one is in the realm of "actor/actress sculptor/sculptress executor/executrix" gender-specific usage.
Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design
Ahh, the language evolves! I could never get my head arounf 'sewists' but 'stitchers' seems (excuse the pun) like a nice non-gender-specific term....
Reply to
The Wanderer

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